Side Hustle City

S4 - Ep23 - Embracing Mindfulness and Unleashing Your Inner Side Hustle with Claire E Parsons

June 01, 2023 Adam Koehler With Claire E. Parsons Season 4 Episode 23
S4 - Ep23 - Embracing Mindfulness and Unleashing Your Inner Side Hustle with Claire E Parsons
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Side Hustle City
S4 - Ep23 - Embracing Mindfulness and Unleashing Your Inner Side Hustle with Claire E Parsons
Jun 01, 2023 Season 4 Episode 23
Adam Koehler With Claire E. Parsons

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In this captivating episode of Embrace Your Inner Side Hustle, we sit down with Claire E. Parsons, a dynamic force in the legal field and an influential voice in the mindfulness community.

Based in Cincinnati, Ohio, Claire is an esteemed attorney at Wood + Lamping LLP, specializing in employment, litigation, and local government law. But she doesn't stop there. Claire is also a mindfulness and compassion teacher, founder of the Brilliant Legal Mind blog, and a prolific author. Her books, "How to Be a Badass Lawyer," and the insightful children's book "Mommy Needs a Minute," showcase her range of expertise and her commitment to spreading awareness about the importance of mental well-being.

Throughout our engaging conversation, Claire shares her personal journey finding solace in mindfulness and meditation, a path that has led her to a rewarding side hustle. We delve into the intricacies of employment law, the necessity of professional training, and the significant role that understanding personality types plays in effective people management. Claire also explores the often overlooked gender dynamics within the field of mindfulness and meditation, drawing from her rich experience as a speaker at a Women's Summit.

This episode is a treasure trove of insights on a variety of topics, from the art of self-care for personal and professional success to the impactful process of writing and maintaining a blog. We also discuss the pivotal role of social media presence in our contemporary world. Claire offers invaluable advice on meditation practices and shares how she transformed her passion into a successful side hustle, providing inspiration for listeners to embark on their own journeys.

Tune in to this enlightening conversation and learn how to unlock the potential of your side hustle, leverage the benefits of authorship, and understand the essence of giving back. Get ready to be inspired and learn from Claire's invaluable experiences. This episode promises to equip you with the tools you need to turn your own mind from burdened to brilliant.

As you're inspired to embark on your own side hustle journey after listening to this episode, you might wonder where to start or how to make your vision a reality. That's where our trusted partner, Reversed Out Creative comes in. Specializing in strategic branding and digital marketing, Reversed Out Creative is an advertising agency dedicated to helping you turn your side hustle into your main hustle. With a team of experienced professionals and a track record of helping clients achieve their dreams, they are ready to assist you in reaching your goals. To find out more about how they can elevate your side hustle, visit www.reversedout.com today and start your journe

Everyday AI: Your daily guide to grown with Generative AI
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Subscribe to Side Hustle City and join our Community on Facebook

Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

Send us a Text Message.

In this captivating episode of Embrace Your Inner Side Hustle, we sit down with Claire E. Parsons, a dynamic force in the legal field and an influential voice in the mindfulness community.

Based in Cincinnati, Ohio, Claire is an esteemed attorney at Wood + Lamping LLP, specializing in employment, litigation, and local government law. But she doesn't stop there. Claire is also a mindfulness and compassion teacher, founder of the Brilliant Legal Mind blog, and a prolific author. Her books, "How to Be a Badass Lawyer," and the insightful children's book "Mommy Needs a Minute," showcase her range of expertise and her commitment to spreading awareness about the importance of mental well-being.

Throughout our engaging conversation, Claire shares her personal journey finding solace in mindfulness and meditation, a path that has led her to a rewarding side hustle. We delve into the intricacies of employment law, the necessity of professional training, and the significant role that understanding personality types plays in effective people management. Claire also explores the often overlooked gender dynamics within the field of mindfulness and meditation, drawing from her rich experience as a speaker at a Women's Summit.

This episode is a treasure trove of insights on a variety of topics, from the art of self-care for personal and professional success to the impactful process of writing and maintaining a blog. We also discuss the pivotal role of social media presence in our contemporary world. Claire offers invaluable advice on meditation practices and shares how she transformed her passion into a successful side hustle, providing inspiration for listeners to embark on their own journeys.

Tune in to this enlightening conversation and learn how to unlock the potential of your side hustle, leverage the benefits of authorship, and understand the essence of giving back. Get ready to be inspired and learn from Claire's invaluable experiences. This episode promises to equip you with the tools you need to turn your own mind from burdened to brilliant.

As you're inspired to embark on your own side hustle journey after listening to this episode, you might wonder where to start or how to make your vision a reality. That's where our trusted partner, Reversed Out Creative comes in. Specializing in strategic branding and digital marketing, Reversed Out Creative is an advertising agency dedicated to helping you turn your side hustle into your main hustle. With a team of experienced professionals and a track record of helping clients achieve their dreams, they are ready to assist you in reaching your goals. To find out more about how they can elevate your side hustle, visit www.reversedout.com today and start your journe

Everyday AI: Your daily guide to grown with Generative AI
Can't keep up with AI? We've got you. Everyday AI helps you keep up and get ahead.

Listen on: Apple Podcasts   Spotify

Support the Show.

Subscribe to Side Hustle City and join our Community on Facebook

Speaker 2:

Welcome to Side Hustle City And thanks for joining us. Our goal is to help you connect to real people who found success turning their side hustle into a main hustle, and we hope you can too. I'm Adam Kaler. I'm joined by Kyle Stevy, my co-host. Let's get started, all right. Welcome back everybody to the Side Hustle City podcast. Today we got a special guest, a friend of Kyle Stevy's, even though Kyle can't be here today Claire E Parsons. How you doing, claire? I'm doing well, and the E differentiates her from other people, especially an English I don't know. Writer, comedian.

Speaker 3:

She's a copywriter, so she helps people with like their social media presence and do ad writing and things like that. Her name is Claire Parsons. She's actually pretty funny. She has some tips on LinkedIn and content creation, if you're interested. There's also another Claire Parsons down in Texas who's a lawyer, and she seemed much more impressive than me, so, in fairness to her, i decided to add my initial Separate yourself.

Speaker 2:

So she's the Claire Parsons, the regular Claire Parsons, and then your Claire E Parsons. Claire E Parsons actually sounds more fancy.

Speaker 3:

I mean, I try to be fancy where I can.

Speaker 2:

I like Claire E Parsons. That sounds cool. So your friends with Kyle Stevie you guys essentially like are in the same neighborhood or grew up in the same neighborhood. His brothers obviously, just like him. paying the butt, Sounds like they didn't know how to act in church. So did you have to discipline these kids or what was going on?

Speaker 3:

No, they made me feel better. I mean because my sister and I were never really paying attention and doing what we were supposed to do. So if they got in trouble a little bit in church, you know, it gave us a little more wiggle room.

Speaker 2:

Wait, was this Catholic church.

Speaker 3:

Oh yeah, it also made it even worse because you can't. We had a tiny Catholic church We went to and now it's the church of Target. So Kyle lived up the street in Woodlawn And I was right there, right where everyone confused it for Bellevue, newport or Fort Thomas, and so we went to Holy Spirit and that's not St Francis, that's not a church anymore, that was all bought up and now it's Target. So no way Which I have to admit I go to Target a lot more than church these days, so you know.

Speaker 2:

I mean it's still that ground was consecrated at some point. So while you're in Target, say a few Hail Marys you know that's your penance, yeah, yeah, and maybe it'll work out. You never know. I don't know if that works or not, or they probably don't sell crucifixes or anything in there, so you can't really go anywhere near there, but at least it was at one point. The church.

Speaker 3:

I mean you can try to pray and not buy a bunch of extra stuff that you don't need in Target. But it's never worked out for me.

Speaker 2:

That's what you should do Pray And I just came from Target. Pray that you don't buy too much stuff. Yeah, we're going into a recession people. Yeah, we got to stop stop buying things. And it was funny the other day I just read and it's on my Instagram, It's on my Facebook I think it the most hilarious thing The England I think the Bank of England or the UK government, some government association or something told people to oh yeah, Britain's need to accept they are poorer, Economist says. And so they're telling people that they shouldn't be buying stuff because they're poor, Like you are poorer. Why are you buying stuff? And they're doing it because they're sick of raising interest rates to curb inflation, just like we're trying to do here. So they're like stop buying things, because if you buy things, the demand is still there, So the prices are going to keep going up. So I think that's the idea. But it's just funny that a government that owes like $2 trillion to itself is telling people not to buy things.

Speaker 3:

It sounds un-American to me. What's British, So it is un-American. I can't imagine either party in America saying that frankly.

Speaker 2:

No, no, no, no, no, no. But this, yeah, this is the British. So, yeah, I think they're pretty plain. They come out and just say what they feel. I think in England, right, i think so. Yeah, do you travel?

Speaker 3:

Not too much. I've got kids.

Speaker 2:

Oh, makes it hard I haven't a lot.

Speaker 3:

I'm doing like conferences and going around the country a little bit with that, but like, not like internationally, and probably not for a while. My kids are getting older, so they'll be able to handle some flights soon.

Speaker 2:

But that's good.

Speaker 3:

That's just happened, and then we had the pandemic for the last few years, so that obviously we weren't going anywhere.

Speaker 2:

That sucked, Yeah Well. And then Kyle. I mean, obviously he travels. He's here for maybe 50% of our podcast, So he's here in spirit. This is where Kyle's supposed to be, but he's not here. So, as you can see, Kyle travels even though he's got kids. I think his kids are the main reason that he travels. I think that's the thing. So tell me a little bit about you. Know, you're an attorney, Kyle's an attorney. He's a non-practicing attorney. He talks about it, He read a book and I think he mentioned in his book but he doesn't actually practice. So you actually practice. So talk a little bit about your area of practice. And then, what got you into mindfulness and kind of your side hustle?

Speaker 3:

Yeah, so I do practice. I work at a law firm. It's here in town, woodlamping, and we are about 40 attorneys, but we're growing, so I'm not exactly sure on that number. We just brought in a few people. And so I do employment and labor law, i do litigation and I also do local government work. Some of that over the years has been schools and cities. Right now it's actually more special entities and counties and things.

Speaker 3:

But that kind of just changed basis based on client needs. I changed firms last year So that switched things up a little bit. So right now it's very employment and labor focused. There's a lot of activity in employment law. There's a lot of things been going on. Actually, labor law has been pretty active And I think that's going to continue for the next several years And so it's kind of an exciting thing for me to learn and do. But I've been practicing for about 15 years. So sometimes I go to court and talk to the judge, sometimes I am answering questions and guiding clients through things to try to avoid litigation, and sometimes I'm doing kind of other things as needed and other kind of litigation and pitching in where I can, just because that's the way law firms work and you have to respond to client needs.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, yeah, well, and right now, i mean, you've got a slew of people getting laid off, especially in tech firms. Does that apply to anything that you're doing right now? Or I guess, when somebody gets laid off, sometimes people don't agree with the layoff or the firing or whatever happened to them, so they have to come to you and say, hey look, i think I was discriminated against, i think you know whatever. How do you sort all that out? Is that going up right now? Is that an issue?

Speaker 3:

The layoffs are an issue.

Speaker 3:

Now, we don't my firm doesn't represent like Google or somebody like that necessarily But, like we've advised on some other layoffs And what tends to happen with layoffs is they are a little bit contagious, so one company or a big mover in the industry will do them, and then you'll see other ones doing them, and so when Google and Facebook and some of those had layoffs, then you did see other companies sort of following suit.

Speaker 3:

Some of it, though, is also just a matter of economic slowdown, and it does affect the need for jobs and what you need to do, and so many places will engage employment counsel to do that. And then, on the other side, you know I we've done some. I know I haven't personally, but we've had some like, like compliance discussions with clients when we're going through the layoffs thing, and then I've also done, like, some reviews of severance agreements and things like that, and I have been seeing those in the layoffs sphere a little bit more frequently, and they can affect a lot of things, and so that's why people will even just to review a severance agreement it's worth it to have a lawyer take a look at that, because there's a whole lot of things going on and there's some new activity in employment There could be like non-competes or something in there that you don't know about, and there's changes on non-competes and there's changes on nondisclosures.

Speaker 3:

There's changes on what counts as an unfair labor practice that can affect a severance agreement, whether you're in a union or not, and so, yeah, it's a good idea to have an employment lawyer take a look at it, because there's just issues that are always coming in. I was really when I started to move more into unemployment and labor in the last year or two. I was just really surprised at how much activity is going on and from various agencies And, frankly, not just agencies, also local government And some of the polarization that we're seeing in the United States. It's starting to be a little bit of a patchwork when you go to employment law, because you'll have one law in Ohio and one law in California And if you're a multi-state company, that can create some issues.

Speaker 2:

Oh yeah, And your HR person was probably pulling their hair out.

Speaker 3:

Yeah Well, for a company that size they might have multiple HR people. But I bet they have some interesting team meetings.

Speaker 2:

Well, i got a business degree and I think I got a C in my HR class. So that wasn't the best class for me. So I would definitely be calling an attorney to handle any kind of HR situation. And I mean people are going to have this. I mean, if somebody's listening, right now you've got a side hustle. You've got a business that you've got going on. Right now you want to scale that up. You're eventually going to hire people. I mean these are things that are going to come up. These are issues that you're going to face, and people always say work on your business, not in your business. If you're dealing with HR issues, you're working in your business and you're not working on your business, right?

Speaker 3:

Yeah Well, the reality is for many small businesses like, the job of HR is oftentimes something that organically grows with the business And so there isn't really an HR degree. Many people who are in HR usually come from like a communications or a business background. There isn't really a degree in HR in most colleges And so it's not necessarily a defined pedigree. There are certifications you can get, which is HRCI or SHRM, and I just took the SHRM exam actually this year and it was really hard.

Speaker 3:

So mad respect for all the HR people. I'm not saying that they don't deserve respect. I'm just saying sometimes it's a job that you may have to kind of learn as you go And, depending on the size of the company, you may not have had a whole lot of background experience that leads up to that. You may have to get some training as you go and you may have to go to seminars or get involved in your SHRM organization to pick up skills. And if you're in a good place, that's wonderful. But sometimes very small businesses, they may have to do some of the HR job functions. They may have to have those discussions with employees, they may have to figure out and manage some of the benefits things. So sometimes that's not always a separate department, depending on the size of the company that you're dealing with.

Speaker 2:

It's just wild to me that there are some crazy degrees out there that you can get like some very granular type of degrees in the social sciences and things like that And you can get an HR specific degree.

Speaker 3:

There may be some. Some colleges and universities may have some learning pathways created that they call it an HR degree. But truly HR touches on so many different things And when you get to big companies they may be. There may be specialists in just the document and information management. As to employees, there are specialists who just do training And then there's other specialists who actually work with the coaching aspects and work with employees in terms of job pathways and things like benefits and compensation and things.

Speaker 3:

But at the small scale, many people, many companies, don't have a defined HR person. Like very small I'm talking about, like less than like five employees, you may not necessarily have that as a defined job function. That is often why in some cases you know there are problems that happen because people don't necessarily have that higher level degree of skill and may not know. But that may also mean that some small companies may outsource that more to. for instance, there are companies here in town we have ARIGO and some others that do some HR services that actually get outsourced. Or you may rely on legal counsel to help you with some of those things as well.

Speaker 2:

That sounds like a sidehouse of opportunity.

Speaker 3:

Well, i mean, some people have done that. I know some employment lawyers who it's not maybe a side hustle but it might be more complimentary services with their law practice, where they sort of add that on So they maybe can do employment law, true law things. But they also can do some kind of consulting. And I know some people who have like their. Most of them are like sole practitioners So they're still lawyers, so it still probably counts as like within their law practice, not truly a side hustle, but it is a complimentary service package that you can provide to really meet the needs of your client holistically.

Speaker 2:

I mean I could see it being a big problem for side hustle people. You know, if you've got one or two people, maybe you've got some people that are freelancing for you or whatever. You don't know where the boundaries are. Like, hey, can I, you know? do I need to do this, do I need to do that?

Speaker 2:

Or if you're like my wife Shannon's a spa and she only has a couple employees, if she has to let somebody go, how does that work with unemployment? Like, how does that, you know? so these questions come up for people, and a lot of times you're going to be hiring people. You're actually going to have W2 employees and not, i mean, i got people all around the world, then they're all contractors, right, but sometimes you're going to need to have a W2 employee. And if you have a W2 employee, there's a whole different set of things that you got to know about. So potentially taking classes to understand how that stuff works, or going out and finding someone who can maybe maybe not work for you full time, but if you only got a couple employees but could consult with you on a regular basis, if that's possible.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, I mean Aragot in here in town. Aragot does good people, a good job And I know I know somebody who works there And I would just say like, just get an employment lawyer. And you know, sometimes people think getting a lawyer means going to court and spend $50,000 in litigation. No, you make a phone call. You maybe spend $500 on a phone call and having some guidance, so you can avoid all that Way worth it. Yeah, Yeah, And usually, like when you do general counsel work and I do, I do general counsel and litigation I mean part of that is establishing the relationship with the client and trying to understand their business and their needs and what's going on. And so if you have generally those general counsel relationships, you know when they're good they last a long time, so that the lawyer doesn't have to keep learning everything new every time And it just improves efficiencies and, I think, gets a better result.

Speaker 2:

Makes a whole lot of sense. Yeah, and people are doing more like this. We've all we've had a someone on who does CFO work for folks, but does it for like 40 different companies. Cmo work Obviously that's been outsourced for a long time, but pretty much all the like the main functions of all these different departments in a business. You could find someone just to be like a fractional, maybe HR person that could help you or call an attorney. I mean, most of these things probably don't require a whole lot of time to be on the phone, like you're not going to have to, you know, retain this person for months. This is probably something like hey, i had to let somebody go, i had some questions about it, they filed for unemployment, what do I do? And then I just need to get on a call for about an hour or two and figure it out right.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, and it depends what you need. So if you need, true, if you need, like, hr information services, you'll want more like an AERAGO or one of those outsourced companies that actually can help you manage and administer things. If you truly have legal questions and you need guidance on the pathway forward, and or you need to, you know, terminate an employee and you want to do it in the right way, you just want to write it. Somebody write a letter for you or whatever. Create a severance agreement. You want a lawyer for that.

Speaker 3:

And so some of that is, i think, like if you have a good provider, whether it's a legal attorney or another kind of provider. Having a good provider that you trust and that you work with, they'll help you identify what it is you need And they'll tell you I mean the good ones that you can trust. You know they'll tell you when they aren't the right person for something or if somebody can do it you know, more efficiently or cheaper or something. I think the good people will tell you that.

Speaker 2:

Well, that's good to know Because, yeah, who knows what some of this stuff and I mean things are getting a lot more complicated. now I there's another article I read. they said that they've had to fire somebody said they've had to fire more Gen Z workers within the first five days than any other generation. They said the Gen Z workers are particularly their combative and they question everything and they think they're smarter than you Like. that's actually the words of a through a survey, some of the feedback that I think it was Bloomberg. they got this whole survey going and there's a lot of like issues between management and younger workers.

Speaker 3:

now And I don't know how much I would say that. I mean, i have a 11-year-old, so I can definitely see that down the truth.

Speaker 3:

Well, kids are bad and I get their trouble in general, right Some of that, though, and there's a lot of discussion about the generational differences and everything like that, and I'm not saying those don't exist. I do think some of what you said is young people right. I do think, though, young people now in Gen Z, they're going to have more access to information, and they think they know their rights more, and whether that's always true I don't know, but I can tell you how that will kind of influence the way some people behave sometimes when they think they know there's so much more information.

Speaker 2:

Now, the problem is, there's not always easy access to understand what information is relevant and applicable, and so that's the hard part, yes, yes, but it also feels like I mean you mentioned, you know just this the tension people have nowadays, mainly politically right. You have a lot of tension, that kind of stuff carrying over into the workplace. You know people posting things. You got to watch out on social media because now social media is a big thing and it's forever. You got to watch out with that kind of stuff, especially if you're in a management type of position. So you really have to watch it nowadays and I think HR has probably got its work cut out for it.

Speaker 3:

I think it's. you've always had to watch it, i think. I mean, I think increasingly people understand rights and responsibilities in employment law, like the public, understand some of these things, and so I think you probably are more likely to be called out on it. I think that lawsuits and probably EEOC complaints and those things probably are up in comparison to 30, 40 years ago. But what I would say is I think you probably need to focus more on training, and I think training in a lot of ways. One is training of understanding of legal issues, but then the other piece is the training on things like emotional intelligence and working with people.

Speaker 3:

I can tell you I understand the criticisms of millennials. I am old millennial myself. I understand the criticisms of Gen Z and I'll just tell you, from working as a lawyer, i can see some criticisms of boomers and Gen Xers as well. I think boomers, i think, often fail to communicate clearly. They often will not have difficult conversations, they delay things and they're often afraid to. They're very afraid of emotions and don't necessarily know how to deal with that. And the reality is that's coming into the workplace. I think a lot of the idea that we can be these dark-suited people in the workplace and hide who we are. I think that kind of is going away and we're going to have some struggles with that. But I think there are some good training and we have more science at our disposal to understand how people really work, and so I think that investing in training and investing in really cultivating good leadership skills in business I think it really matters.

Speaker 2:

You might have just touched on my favorite subject and Kyle would make fun of me if he was here but Myers-Briggs, so I'm an ENTP, which is like the least emotional. Well, my wife's an INTP, which is the least emotional. Like they're stoic, kind of just. You know, they don't show their emotions, they don't. Neither do we Like I'm like second worst.

Speaker 2:

So when it comes to managing people, i have a very, very logical no emotions To me. It's like feelings. I can't stand it. Like it actually irks me when something like I'm like the opposite, like you're this mindful person and this empathetic person, where I'm like the opposite, i'm like just get it together and get out of here, you know, or whatever, Like that's just kind of the way I'm built, you know, and I don't. Like there's nothing I can really change about it. I can be cognizant of it, right, and understand that that's what I do. And then, right before I send that email, i take it into chat, gpt, and tell it to make it nicer, and then it fixes it for me, and then I'm like that sounds like Claire wrote it and sent it off.

Speaker 3:

You need the robot to make you nicer.

Speaker 2:

I do. I do It's bad, It's bad.

Speaker 3:

Well, i don't. I don't know if I want to. I'm bursting your bubble here or not, but I'm actually. I've tested as an EN and I at different times, but I am an NTJ, oh.

Speaker 2:

NTJ Yes, oh, you're. yeah.

Speaker 3:

So, like I think I saw, you might actually be worse than me, yeah, no, i saw a meme one time I love the NTJ memes where it was like I, it had the Cape Lanshet from Lord of the Rings where she turned all scary. It was that picture where she's like see me and despair that picture. And it was like I am an NTG, all who you know come before me to spare or something. And I cracked me up because I can totally be that way And like if I'm in trial and I'm cross examining someone, i can tear them apart. And unfortunately that sometimes happens in my personal life too And I have to say I'm sorry a lot.

Speaker 2:

But you've got to be so aware of it, like mine mine is actually called the debater Like we are the attorney. Like I'm not an attorney. I just passed my real estate exam today, but I'm not the attorney type, right? I just I don't know if I could be an attorney, but I probably could, depending on what kind of law I'm practicing. But apparently we like to argue with people.

Speaker 3:

I love it, it's fun, i mean. I mean I will just say like I think it's fun And like, unfortunately, like less and less do I have friends that are like on the opposite you know political spectrum that I can actually talk with, but when I do, it's fun And I learn so much. But, and I, but I think you're not being.

Speaker 2:

you're not being argumentative to to piss them off, necessarily. You're trying to figure out why people believe what they believe. You're trying to make sense of the world is what I understand, yeah.

Speaker 3:

But I think sometimes, when you actually and maybe it's you're not trying to hurt them necessarily, Some end up.

Speaker 2:

I think you don't try.

Speaker 3:

E-N-T-Js can definitely hurt them, whether you intend to or not, or you can just go too far. But I think, like sometimes, like as a lawyer, like our system of law whether it always works this way is one thing, but it's built on the idea that when ideas clash against each other, we might figure out what the truth is and we might get to that truth There you go Something.

Speaker 3:

Yes, the problem is that many of us don't know how to argue very well and it's easy to get real personal about things. So instead of ideas clashing, it's people clashing, and it's just you got to be super skilled to not hurt people's feelings in doing that. And I'm not even sure with with my training and background, i have that at this point. But in terms of like the E-N-T-J and this is who I am and all of those things, that's not 100% true. So one thing is Myers-Briggs. I'm not sure how scientific it really is. It seems like it works.

Speaker 3:

Well, there's personality tests And I do think like I actually just had someone on my blog do an interview about the Enneagram, so, and I took the Enneagram and I'm actually a type six And I learned a whole lot from that because I didn't understand parts of my personality, like I just didn't see that. And then when I read the report and I was like, oh, that kind of makes sense And that kind of helped me learn something new. But does it mean that that's who you are and it won't change? I'm not so sure. But if it gives you information about yourself and it helps you learn, that's great. Or if it helps you as a business, you know, decide who might be a good fit, that can be good.

Speaker 2:

It can get you in the ballpark, yeah.

Speaker 3:

If you're using, as a business though, just legal tidbit, you got to make sure that's going to hold up in court in terms of scientific reliability, because if it doesn't, it can be proxy for discrimination.

Speaker 2:

You got to watch that. Oh wow.

Speaker 3:

So but in terms of personality tests, I'll say something about, like I actually have used the Myers-Briggs as an example in instruction and talking about mindfulness. So some of these personality traits, are they really inherent And are they like predetermined, Or are some of them actually habits? And I would submit to you, and using lawyerly speech, that some of them actually are habits. And what I experienced when I started learning about things like mindfulness and compassion, which is really important to mindfulness, is that it kind of balanced me out. Like I'm an ENTJ, so the thinking and the judging are a big part of my personality, but E or I or whatever connection and intuition are a big part of my personality too.

Speaker 3:

So before I started meditating and learning about mindfulness, i was mostly T and J.

Speaker 3:

I was really thinking and judging a whole lot, and some of that is law school, some of that is law practice. But I kind of left a part of my personality out And I felt blocked a lot, i felt lonely a lot, i felt like I didn't belong. And then when I started to kind of give myself a little bit of a break, not be in my head so much, and started to be a little more creative, then the other parts of my personality came out. So one thing can be even within your personality, you may be leaning on some aspects of it more than others. Maybe you feel safer there, maybe you have gotten more validated in your life for those kind of behaviors versus other ones. But it doesn't mean those other pieces aren't there. And so sometimes, when you do things like take up a meditation practice or learn about mindfulness, one of the things you start to see is your patterns and habits. And then you start to see where you actually might be able to change some of those, and that's where a lot of the magic can happen.

Speaker 2:

Interesting. So you kind of have to think and I'm on this constant journey of improvement, self-improvement, and I think that's kind of like our personality types are both the same way. It's just I lead with a different kind of cognitive stack than you do. The INTJ and I have the same kind of cognitive stack, but there are those secondary ones that you kind of have dormant, that you do or people mistake your compassion for something else. So we're constantly trying to help people, but we do it in a way that comes off kind of dickish, but our main goal is to try to help people as much as possible.

Speaker 2:

So we actually are compassionate, even though our frontward outward appearance is, you know, a devil's advocate or somebody who's constantly challenging people and arguing with people. But, like for you and I right here, entjs use logic based on objective facts while ENTPs use logic based on what makes sense to them. So like that's the big difference between the two. It's like you're even more logical than me. So A for you to be able to say, hey, i found this compassion that was in me, this mindfulness, this meditation, when I meditated, when I was able to bring this out, that would be even more of a challenge for you than I think it would be for me. So that's like a big. I mean you probably feel like that's kind of a big win in your life actually.

Speaker 3:

It's been a big shift And I'll say that the thing about meditation, that's different, i think. So there's always this kind of question about like Buddhism and other religions, right, and one of the reasons that Buddhism is a little bit different in its approach And I don't know that I consider myself a Buddhist, but most of the practices I do come from Buddhism, right Meditation itself.

Speaker 2:

Which is more of a philosophy opposed to a religion.

Speaker 3:

Yes, And it depends really exactly what flavor of Buddhism you're looking at before you can answer that question.

Speaker 2:

Don't worry, my dad's like a Native American Indian, so it's fine.

Speaker 3:

Cool. So with Buddhism, though, it's actually been researched in a clinical setting, so there's a bunch of science relating to it. Oh, wow, where that is one of the big. That's why you're hearing so much about meditation versus hearing so much about prayer. There's some studies that talk about the value of prayer, but we don't really know what exactly you have to do for it to count as prayer, for you to get all those benefits right.

Speaker 3:

With meditation, we have specific practices that can be replicated and studied, and so we know a little bit more about that And we know about how different practices affect you differently. But with meditation, you don't just learn about mindfulness, you don't just learn the concepts. You don't just learn what some of these Buddhist ideas are. It's the practice that matters, and so when you actually practice it and you experience mindfulness and you actually do calm down, when you're trying to get your kids out the door and you can't find your car keys and you're late, instead of freaking out, and you feel that difference, that's where you see it. So, yeah, so I might have my ideas of what the objective facts are, but my ideas are going to change based on my experience And if you're meditating and you have mindfulness in your life more, you're going to see it more clearly what's actually happening, instead of being stuck in your preconceived ideas of what the facts are. Dr.

Speaker 2:

Justin Marchegiani Very interesting. And now for most people, now this is what I would say you know. back to HR, i've run into a lot more women who are in HR than men, you know, and I think that may be just because in general I think they're more in tune with people, they're more group-minded versus individualistic, and I mean I think there's even science around that. So, but is there less men who you've encountered interested in meditation, interested in this mindfulness, than women?

Speaker 2:

My wife is way more into this stuff than I am. I'm like, just go to work, get my stuff done, you know, do five things at once. And she's like, no, i need to focus. you know, i need my meditation time. Like there's a certain time I'm allowed to go upstairs and go to sleep because she's got to do her things, her routines right. So she's way into it. I mean, we've got Hindu God pictures up on our walls and stuff that she's all into, just because I mean, it was a Disney artist that did them too, so they're actually look kinda cool. But she's very much into exploring different things, you know. And me I'm just like I'm Catholic, that's it. You know my dad's into New Age religion stuff and everything else But me. this is me right, like this is what I'm into, and I think a lot of guys probably think like that, maybe more narrow minded.

Speaker 3:

I don't know if I've seen studies that talk about like who are the demographics of who meditate or anything like that. I can tell you like anecdotally from going to retreats I think generally it is more women than men. But I can say like of like the big teachers I don't know that with the meditation teachers, like from insight meditation society or something like that that I necessarily notice a big difference between men and women. I'm I also will say from speaking a lot to lawyers and professionals the women tend to know more about mindfulness concepts and ideas than the men, the ones who are the most enthusiastic after I present and they want to talk to me or something. They're the men They are the most excited. Yeah, oh, wow.

Speaker 2:

Maybe because it just blew away their expectations. They didn't have any predetermined ideas, or they probably went into it like, wow, it's not going to work. Yeah.

Speaker 3:

Well, and so I. So the first time I ever presented on mindfulness was back in 2018. There was a women's summit here in town. Northern Kentucky Chamber has a big women's summit And I was involved with the chamber and I was thinking about applying to speak And I was very nervous about it. I was not a certified teacher at the time. I had been meditating for a long time. I got somewhat obsessed with it And so I knew a lot and could share a lot, and I enjoy writing and speaking, and so my mentor encouraged me to do it. I went ahead and it went really well. I had two sessions. They were both standing room. Only people were bringing chairs in, like I was some famous person or something. Oh, wow, and yeah, i'd never done it before. So it went really well. So then I turned it into a seminar for lawyers, because I was involved in another group and they needed a CLE, so I figured out a way to get CLE credit to talk about.

Speaker 2:

Good, for you Get those.

Speaker 3:

And when I went to talk to lawyers in Kentucky which included men I was actually more nervous about that, but they actually responded to it. You know, they were just more I think I think in need of it. I think they were glad that there was some things that they could actually do. That might help, and I do think the fact that I've used and explained the science and try to break it down really simply so that anybody can understand, i think that is what helps.

Speaker 3:

And that's why, when I wrote my book, that's why I tried to use concepts that people understand in their everyday life and help them understand that this stuff I'm talking about it really makes sense when you think about it and you break it down, even though when you first start to do it it can be frustrating.

Speaker 3:

And then it works and it feels like magic. But it's not magic, it's honestly science, and that I think most people are better than they think they are, and I think when you start to meditate and you get closer to yourself, i often think there's a fear that people are going to find something wrong with them, but really what I think you'll find is that you're a pretty good person As long as you're safe, cared for, protected and loved. We often are missing some of those, or we perceive that we're missing those things, and so it's kind of returning back to what we actually want and figuring out ways to get what we want, instead of trying to go about it the roundabout way by being popular or making a ton of money or beating our enemies or stuff like that.

Speaker 3:

So and it's not that you can't do those things, it's just remembering what actually makes you happy and taking care of the stuff that makes you human first, and then, once you've got that, then you'll find that you're going to have a lot more energy, you're going to be willing to take risks, you're going to be able to handle setbacks, you're actually going to be nicer to other people because you're taking care of first. So I think that the way that I've talked about it, i do think I think when I come and talk to lawyers, i do think the fact that I'm a trial lawyer and have litigated cases, it helps me talk about these things in a way that a psychologist a psychologist who knows more than me, you know admittedly can't do because they haven't lived the life of a lawyer, and so sometimes it sounds like they're lecturing where I'm able to offer stuff that actually works for us.

Speaker 2:

Makes sense. Well, i just looked at the stats 10.3% of women meditate regularly, compared to 5.2% of men. But those between 45 and 64 year old in the 45 to 64 year old age group, they're the ones that practice meditation the most, probably because they're kind of out of that. They're into this more. Like who am I? work is stressful, midlife crisis, i mean there's a lot going on. I mean, you're at your peak of your earning life when you're 45, maybe 65, you're getting ready to retire. But you know, in your 40s you're in your peak earning, which means you're probably super busy also in America at least. But maybe that's an opportunity when you're dealing with stress the most and you think you don't have the time to meditate. That's like the perfect time to meditate.

Speaker 3:

I feel honestly like so, the reason that I started meditating I so. I was a philosophy major in college. I read a book on Buddhism that I grabbed because I stuck at Barnes and Noble with my family one time and I wandered over to the philosophy section, grabbed it. It sat on the shelf for two years and I finally read it. I thought this is the most convincing argument on the human condition I've ever read. I'm going to meditate and then I didn't, obviously. Then, three years later, i am pregnant with my daughter, my first daughter, and they tell me she's going to be small. So I'm 5'11". I've never been small a day in my life. I was a 10 pound baby. So last thing I expected to hear and I blamed myself for it I was depressed. Before I had her and then I had. When she came out and she was 5 pounds, i couldn't breastfeed, i couldn't grow her, i couldn't feed her. So I kind of fell apart and my mom ended up taking me to the doctor one day get me some meds, get me a therapy, stop the breastfeeding. Where she's doing bottles She did fine on those, by the way.

Speaker 3:

But then, a year later it was actually when I started meditating. I recovered from that. I was back at work, felt like I was failing at everything. I had a wrongful death trial coming up. My practice was so busy I couldn't decide what to do and that is when I started meditating.

Speaker 3:

I started at one minute a day and it helped immediately and I can't say that it felt good. People, i think, start to meditate and they want this relaxing experience, like they're going to the spa, and people want the chimes and the bells and the sound bath and all of that, and that can be nice. But that's not really what the research is telling us we need and why the research is telling us it helps. What meditation actually helps us do is to learn to be with experiences that are difficult. So it won't feel great at first. It may feel somewhat overwhelming. So I started at one minute a day and what I can tell you is that when you go roller skating and you're about to fall and you get a little dizzy and you lean against the wall and you like, catch yourself.

Speaker 2:

Oh, I suck at that.

Speaker 3:

That's what that one minute meditation was. It was just stopping for a second and I learned to do that and it felt good, even though when I stopped for a minute I still had the thoughts and stuff flowing around my head, but at least I was stopped for a second. And so I gradually started to increase the time and I worked my way up to 30 minutes eventually and then it became a practice that really helped me. And then eventually I went to retreats and things and having that extended period of time that's where you can do some real work and see some patterns and things It eventually helped me like see some patterns, like doubt and things like that and work through those. But that was when I started my practice.

Speaker 3:

It was the busiest time of my life. I had a one year, almost one year old. I was heading into a trial. I mean, my caseload was just out of control. I was an associate, still didn't know how I was going to make partner and move forward and all of that, worried about building a book and learning how to network and all that crap. And that's when I started and it made a huge difference. And so and what I actually find in my life is that the times where I struggled to meditate is actually when I have less to do. Oh, yeah, so it's when I have more to do that I'm better about it, because when I have more to do, i like I need to slow down. Now I need it, yeah, and it feels good to just stop when I have less to do. That's actually when I, when I'm not busy, i am the worst. I am in the terrible mood. I don't like it. You know I have no structure.

Speaker 3:

So, so the busy thing. I know it's hard, but my recommendation on the busy piece is to start small and to gradually increase, And that's that's the approach that I take in my book in trying to help people figure out a practice over the course of 30 days, but you've written two books.

Speaker 2:

You've got How to Be a Badass Lawyer and Mommy Needs a Minute. And that is a children's book The Mommy Needs a Minute is a children's book, or How to Be a Badass Lawyer.

Speaker 3:

How to Be a Badass Lawyer is a book for big kids, for big lawyers. I'm going to say, lawyers might need the kids book For lawyer kids That's for.

Speaker 3:

That's a regular like self help kind of book. And then the Mommy Needs a Minute is a children's book And that is just out this week, and that is a function of having the right friends. So I have a friend who is a working mom and we are kids met in daycare. We've been friends ever since And she likes to draw pictures the way I come up with words, and I came up with a funny poem I had been thinking for a while about like an idea of doing a children's book, just because I've had some friends who did it, because people say they don't have time or they say they want to meditate but their kids won't leave them alone, and so that's what Mommy Needs a Minute is about.

Speaker 3:

And so I did a poem one night It was actually the week I gave notice at my old firm, so super emotional, i was kind of a mess and I had 20 minutes one night It was about time to get the girls down for bed. Then they had 20 minutes. So I sat down and this poem just came out of my head And I was like, hey, that's kind of funny when I read it, and so I sent it to my friend Naomi and my friend Jeremy, who's a lawyer down in Alabama And he has a company that helps lawyers self polish books. He's written like 10, 12 books or something I don't know, and I knew he did a children's book too. So I sent it to him and Naomi and they both liked it, and then Naomi did the pictures and then I tweaked the words as we went along and Jeremy got it up on Amazon for us.

Speaker 2:

So yeah, nice. Oh well, congratulations on that. That's awesome. Yeah, writing a book is fun. Kyle just wrote his book on tokenization of real estate assets, or just tokenization of like anything that's worth money. Right, that can be a value. And I wrote it's just a sci-fi book or whatever. But now we're working on our new book for the podcast and it's going to be awesome when it finally comes out.

Speaker 2:

But two weeks ago, i think it was, we actually had a gentleman on. He's written 21 bestsellers. He's one of his books, the bestseller. He's helped I think 3000 people write books and they've all been bestsellers. He's like I can guarantee you'll be a bestseller or whatever category. I'm like sign me up, because I've spent 20, like 2,000.2100 bucks probably advertising on Amazon, my book and it's sold $200 worth of books. So whatever I'm doing is not getting it done, so maybe I'll just turn it over to him and see if he can. He can help me out, because apparently he said he's got doctors. When they meet people, they tell him this When they meet people, they're like, oh, i'm a doctor. And then they're like, oh, i'm a bestselling author. People actually respond more favorably to the guy being a bestselling author than him being a doctor. So I don't know you can get that best selling author for that children's book or for the for the other one about the attorney. He's got to be a badass lawyer. Maybe you guys, maybe you don't even need to be a lawyer.

Speaker 3:

Well, I mean, yeah, I. So there's a lot of different reasons that you would write a book. My primary reasons are that I like writing and just always want to stumble into the children's book.

Speaker 2:

It sounds like that's fun.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, and I'm good at coming up with rhymes. I mean, i always like make. do you ever make up fake song, are you? a rapper Yeah, I make, I'm a fake. You can be a ghostwriter for a rapper. Yeah, I make up fake songs for my kids all the time And they're like is that real? I'm like no, it's not real.

Speaker 2:

Like, i make up nicknames, that's what.

Speaker 3:

I do. So I'm just I always have like playing with words and stuff like that. Yeah, just always like I suck at all the you know, all the normal party games, but if they give me a word game or a word jumble or something, i'll dominate. You're like I'm winning. Now I'll dominate that one game at the baby shower every time. So, but yeah, so I wanted to write a book and I will also have a blog too.

Speaker 3:

So part of the progression with the writing was I started I blogged for a group called Miss JD, which was for women lawyers And I at the time I had to do one blog post a month. I had done several legal articles and stuff for magazines and things before, but I'd never really written on stuff relating to like me and my life more, and what I ended up writing on was like some of the things that I did to become a partner in my law firm, like how I made that progression. That was my theme for my blog posts And at the time I wrote one a month and I remember worrying I couldn't do it. Well, i did, i did it and I actually did really well, and I had to start using social media because nobody went to Miss JD on their own. You had to push it out on social media yourself, so I started using Twitter and then LinkedIn, and I like LinkedIn better, just because it's more professional. Yeah.

Speaker 2:

Twitter is a nightmare.

Speaker 3:

Well, it's also better for, like, if you actually want to write longer, a little longer form content.

Speaker 2:

Because you can write articles inside of LinkedIn.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, yeah. And so that's when I started to play around with social media and get more of a presence there And then, after that ended, i was sort of shopping around for where else am I going to write? So I started playing on LinkedIn and that actually happened shortly before the pandemic, and then I was really consistent about writing for a good chunk of from twenty eighteen-ish to nineteen to through the pandemic, and then I wrote so much and it was about mindfulness, and during the pandemic I also got a meditation teacher certification. And how many certifications you got? Well, actually four, because I just got my shirt And you got all these like credentials.

Speaker 2:

You are an ENTJ. For God's sake. Yeah, like you're worse than me, yeah.

Speaker 3:

So I did that, and then I kind of started my blog to celebrate, because I saw how much I was writing about mindfulness. I had a series of meditations that I had to do for the program And it just made sense to kind of put them somewhere, and so that's kind of what happened. So I then started writing a blog post every week, and now I'm up to over, i think, 125 or something at this point.

Speaker 2:

Oh wow, your domain authority should be pretty high right now.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, i mean the views have gone up. I don't know that it's super huge or anything like that, but the views have definitely gone up, as that has occurred.

Speaker 2:

And if you're consistent with your keywords, you're going to own those keywords because you've got so many blog posts. So if you're doing them twice a day, three times a, It's once a week.

Speaker 3:

Once a week, yeah.

Speaker 2:

That's what I do for my blog too. But yeah, my domain authority. I think it's gone from 18 to 23 or something in probably two months.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, see, i don't even know a lot of that, I just write in WordPress, as made it pretty easy. Sorry, i forget what I'm talking about.

Speaker 2:

Sometimes I'm like I mean I get in the agency world because that's my. Maybe I'll call you later. That's my world, yeah.

Speaker 3:

Because I've kind of had to even learn stuff along the way, like actually putting categories and organization and putting buttons to follow and doing all that stuff. I've had to really just learn some of it, Yeah do the internal linking, but even my unexpert approach with that has really helped. And I will say, just having a blog right Telling people that before I was Claire Parsons and I know about meditation And then I became Claire Parsons and I'm a certified meditation teacher And I have a blog And now I'm Claire Parsons, certified meditation.

Speaker 3:

You know, compassionate teacher, i have a blog and author of two books And it's like that's kind of that process of establishing who you are And some of it is a little bit fake right Where people are looking for labels. But, honestly, like having gone through this process and getting the ability to really learn some new things and to get kind of a broad approach with understanding. Like I don't teach yoga, for instance, but I did the yoga teacher certification because during the pandemic I could do that online, so I didn't have to show up to a class, so I could do that at any point in time. So you know, like why not? Like I could practice now and get a yoga teacher certification because I could do it online in my own time. And that stuff didn't take away from my high quality activities, didn't take away from billing or spending time with my kids. That cut into my Netflix time And, frankly, if I'm going to be learning something.

Speaker 3:

I'd rather be learning something online as opposed to Netflix.

Speaker 2:

Yes, yes, this whole podcast. I mean you got so many people to dream about having a side hustle, dream about making a little money on the side doing something else or just and we've had people on a side hustle. Doesn't that be something that makes money? It could just be something that it's a meditation for you. It could just be something to get you out of whatever that routine is that you normally have. You go to this job, you hate it, or maybe you like the job, but you just need to do something else.

Speaker 2:

Kyle, one of his friends, came on here. He makes bourbon barrel cabinets out of bourbon barrels, so it's for people's bourbon And that's just something he does in his garage. Just to do something else. You know works at P&G during the day And it's like those two things couldn't be any more different. You know work at P&G, sell in CPG, and then you come over here and now all of a sudden you're making cabinets. So I mean it's one of those things where it's like you can do so many different things. I mean me personally. I've got a multitude of interests. It sounds like you do too, but I will tell you right now.

Speaker 2:

I looked it up. You are in a really good industry. So meditation statistics. So when I looked up the other statistic about the men and women who meditate, there are 200 to 500 million people who meditate. That's globally. But if you figure 10% of the women in America, 5% of the men, i mean that's a pretty big number. Since 2012, the number of US adults practicing meditation has tripled 36 million adults in the United States have been, have meditated at least once. And then the global meditation market is valued over $5 billion $5 billion. So I mean this is an industry that has growth. And a question I have for you is you've got your own practice, you do your thing. Do you think at any time you may grow that to the point where you need to hire other practitioners or bring other practitioners on to kind of handle some of the stuff you do, or even open franchises of your brand?

Speaker 3:

I don't know that it's really set up for a franchise or brick and mortar or anything like that. I have monetized it to some degree. Largely that's from like selling the books, and I do get paid to speak. I don't get paid every time. Sometimes there's reasons why I would choose to speak for free, like if it's a friend or if it's a cause I really support. Recently I spoke to like a law firm that had a diversity program for encouraging diversity in the legal profession and talking to students. I got asked by a friend who's a professor down at Univell to cover his class form and speak to his law students And I gladly did that.

Speaker 2:

That's awesome Yeah.

Speaker 3:

But that's stuff where I feel like with those kind of projects I get something back, even if it's not payment, because it feels so good to do, and I do think it helps people. And also I'll just say like it benefits my network and me Oh, 100%. And I'm actually reading Give and Take by Adam Grant right now And I just highly recommend that for a lot of people. I've always been a giver but I can just say there's so many times where I felt like I've given away a favor or gone the extra mile for someone And it almost always comes back to you in some way. So it's really a great benefit And it's actually helped my law practice for that way.

Speaker 3:

But I do already have a VA who helps me with some of things on the board Oh, nice, okay, and that's actually something that's been really beneficial and great And she's good And some of her social media knowledge actually is very helpful because I know LinkedIn like the back of my hand. I feel like an old person when I get on Instagram And I don't know what I'm doing.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, instagram's a yeah, it's a trouble thing for me too. I like taking pictures and I, like you know, changing them, altering them. Yesterday I left here. I didn't have my car keys or my wallet and I couldn't get back in And so I just walked home. I took the trolley back to my house, because I just live in Mount Auburn So it's not far, but I documented my trip, so I was taking pictures by all these like different things, just to say, hey, look, cincinnati, like there's places down here, like you know, you could turn lemons and or, yeah, lemons and the lemonade sometimes Leave your keys at the office.

Speaker 2:

Well, you get to explore your city. You know there's things that you could do, but that is one thing that I will agree with after owning a business for 20 years now, if you do stuff for people, there's a lot of people say, oh, don't do anything for free, don't do anything for free, you're wasting your time. You got to, you get paid for everything. Well, man, no, like sometimes somebody hears what you had to say at that free thing you did and then next thing, you know, just don't tell anybody I did it for free, right. But then somebody picks it up and they say, hey, why don't you come and speak to my you know business? We got 30 lawyers that I want you to come in here and talk to. Oh sure, i can do that. You know the fees. You know $100 ahead or something you know. Next thing, you know you've got a nice little chunk of change for a day's worth of work, you know. But that does come back. I mean, it's happened for me do a logo for somebody just for the heck of it. Somebody sees it, calls me up and says, hey, sam said that you did a logo for him and I need a logo to do you know. so, i'm sure, why not? you know, but it does come back to you.

Speaker 2:

I think people want to pay things back to other people. It's almost like a what is it? a gift of obligation. When you go into a place and somebody offers you a bottle of water, even though it's like a 10 cent bottle of water, they feel like, subconsciously, they owe you something in a way, and you're not doing it because you want them to owe you something or you want them to pay you back in any way. If it's your friend, you're doing it just because, hey, i'm. This thing is really helping my life. It's helping me as a person. It's helping me be more empathetic and more compassionate to people, even though that's that may or may not be your original personality type. It probably sounds like something I need to be doing, but you want to share that. That's what it sounds like.

Speaker 3:

Well, yeah, and I've actually had the opposite to where I've asked somebody for help and then they want to help me more, you know interest not only like a mentor, somebody who feels some responsibility for your wellbeing longterm and they really want the best It's.

Speaker 3:

I've had some of those people too. but sometimes you ask people for help and then they they learn about you in the process and then they just want to. they want to help you And I I think a lot of times you, you feel some inclination to pay those people back And I think, like to the extent that you can thank them or send a gift to do that, that's great. But I think a lot of times those people, what they want you to do is do well and then help somebody else.

Speaker 3:

And so because I've had access to some mentors like that. I have been really cognizant of helping other people And I recognize, you know, in the legal profession. You know I am a third generation attorney. My parents weren't necessary. My parents were pretty good leaders in the community. My grandpa was a sole practitioner who you know would do write a letter to somebody for a couple hundred bucks, you know. But like that, even that, like not not having this huge name or anything, but having generations of lawyers before me in my family, that is a huge privilege and not everybody has that. So if a student reaches out to me to talk or have questions or anything, i'm going to talk to them and I'm going to help them as much as I can. I always bring a free copy of my book to give now too. But like that's what we have to do, because it does come back to us but it feels good And if we want a decent world, we have to be participate in making it that way.

Speaker 2:

That's 100% true. So let's talk about all your different things. How do people reach out to you? So if somebody wants you to come speak, how do they find you? You know what's the URL for your blog? Let's give some, some people, some links and stuff so they can find you.

Speaker 3:

My biggest presence is LinkedIn, and I actually probably get a lot of inquiries from people on LinkedIn for messages, so find me on LinkedIn. It's Claire E Parsons. In the terms of the blog, the blog is brilliant legal mindcom, and it is on LinkedIn, instagram, twitter and Facebook. We also have a YouTube channel with some guided meditations on it, and then both of the books are available at various booksellers, but you can find them on Amazon. There's also links to them on the blog page as well.

Speaker 2:

I love it. Man Claire, thanks for coming in today. You opened my eyes. Maybe I'll like start listening to my wife.

Speaker 3:

My general advice to the husbands out there is listen to your wife. Happy, wife happy life right.

Speaker 2:

Isn't that how that works? So, anyway, yeah, i'll get her. She told me the other day she's like Adam, you need to start meditating, and I was like I don't need to meditate. Well, now you've convinced me. So great guys, check it out. Claire has some awesome links and you should go check out her blog for sure. And yeah, you're available. When are you normally available to speak?

Speaker 3:

Is it just like months ahead, or It really depends on the time you're talking about. I've got you know it really depends because, like, my schedule is all over the place. I try to be flexible with people because I understand how different seminars have to go and things. But I do virtual, i do in person and I try to. You know I'm a lawyer, i'm a service provider, so you know I try to make the client as happy as I can. I do like to talk to people in advance and at least get a feel for what they're looking for, mostly because now I'm starting to really talk to lawyers and professionals and educators and all kinds of people And so I want to make sure I understand. But I think with a five, 10 minute phone call we can get to that clarity and offer something really great.

Speaker 2:

I love it, Claire. Well, thanks so much for being on the show. Kyle's going to be upset. He wasn't here to ask you all kinds of questions.

Speaker 3:

I know. I'm glad he didn't ask me about his book, because I tried to listen to the episode about it and I was totally lost. And that is not to say he explained it badly, that was more me.

Speaker 2:

But Hey, no, no, no, no, no, no, he'll admit it's tough. He had trouble even writing it, so that's fine, anyway. Well, claire, thanks for being on the show. We really appreciate it. Yep, thanks, Thanks for joining us on this week's episode of Side Hustle City. Well, you've heard from our guests. Now let's hear from you. Join our community on Facebook, side Hustle City. It's a group where people share ideas, share their inspirational stories and motivate each other to be successful and turn their side hustle into their main hustle. We'll see you there and we'll see you next week on the show. Thank you.

Side Hustle City Podcast With Claire
(Cont.) Side Hustle City Podcast With Claire
Navigating Employment Issues and Training Needs
Exploring Personality Types and Self-Improvement
Meditation and Mindfulness Demographics
Meditation and Writing Practice
Writing and Finding Your Side Hustle
Doing Things for Free