Side Hustle City

S4 - Ep28 - Mastering High Ticket Sales: Transforming Your Side Hustle into a Thriving Business with Kenny Cannon

June 26, 2023 Adam Koehler & Kyle Stevie With Kenny Cannon Season 4 Episode 28
S4 - Ep28 - Mastering High Ticket Sales: Transforming Your Side Hustle into a Thriving Business with Kenny Cannon
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Side Hustle City
S4 - Ep28 - Mastering High Ticket Sales: Transforming Your Side Hustle into a Thriving Business with Kenny Cannon
Jun 26, 2023 Season 4 Episode 28
Adam Koehler & Kyle Stevie With Kenny Cannon

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Do you want to master high ticket sales and turn your side hustle into a lucrative main gig? Join us as we chat with Kenny Cannon, the founder of Virtual Closing Academy, who shares his personal journey. Kenny sheds light on the importance of sales in business and how his company trains high ticket closers and appointment setters to make powerful transformations in their lives.

We dive into the world of sales and lead management techniques, where Kenny shares his belief that sales are a transfer of emotion at its core. Discover how tapping into customers' emotional triggers can lead to higher chances of closing a sale and how using an application process can help assess a customer's needs effectively. We also discuss the role of appointment setters and the importance of not overwhelming customers with too much information.

Lastly, we explore the significance of gaining sales experience before launching your business, learning through other offers, and the range of percentage commission deals for salespeople. Kenny offers insights into niche offers in the fitness, finance, and hobby sectors that can be monetized online, as well as the pitfalls of affiliate marketing. Don't miss out on these valuable insights and strategies for those looking to level up their sales game and transform their side hustle into a thriving business.

As you're inspired to embark on your own side hustle journey after listening to this episode, you might wonder where to start or how to make your vision a reality. That's where our trusted partner, Reversed Out Creative comes in. Specializing in strategic branding and digital marketing, Reversed Out Creative is an advertising agency dedicated to helping you turn your side hustle into your main hustle. With a team of experienced professionals and a track record of helping clients achieve their dreams, they are ready to assist you in reaching your goals.

To find out more about how they can elevate your side hustle, visit www.reversedout.com today and start your journey toward success. Our blog is also full of great information that we work hard on to provide you with a leg up on the competition. We also recently launched our YouTube Channel, Marketing Pro Trends,  which summarizes all of our blog posts.

FranchiseU!
FranchiseU! is for those in, or considering, careers within the world of franchising.

Listen on: Apple Podcasts   Spotify

Support the Show.

Subscribe to Side Hustle City and join our Community on Facebook

Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

Send us a Text Message.

Do you want to master high ticket sales and turn your side hustle into a lucrative main gig? Join us as we chat with Kenny Cannon, the founder of Virtual Closing Academy, who shares his personal journey. Kenny sheds light on the importance of sales in business and how his company trains high ticket closers and appointment setters to make powerful transformations in their lives.

We dive into the world of sales and lead management techniques, where Kenny shares his belief that sales are a transfer of emotion at its core. Discover how tapping into customers' emotional triggers can lead to higher chances of closing a sale and how using an application process can help assess a customer's needs effectively. We also discuss the role of appointment setters and the importance of not overwhelming customers with too much information.

Lastly, we explore the significance of gaining sales experience before launching your business, learning through other offers, and the range of percentage commission deals for salespeople. Kenny offers insights into niche offers in the fitness, finance, and hobby sectors that can be monetized online, as well as the pitfalls of affiliate marketing. Don't miss out on these valuable insights and strategies for those looking to level up their sales game and transform their side hustle into a thriving business.

As you're inspired to embark on your own side hustle journey after listening to this episode, you might wonder where to start or how to make your vision a reality. That's where our trusted partner, Reversed Out Creative comes in. Specializing in strategic branding and digital marketing, Reversed Out Creative is an advertising agency dedicated to helping you turn your side hustle into your main hustle. With a team of experienced professionals and a track record of helping clients achieve their dreams, they are ready to assist you in reaching your goals.

To find out more about how they can elevate your side hustle, visit www.reversedout.com today and start your journey toward success. Our blog is also full of great information that we work hard on to provide you with a leg up on the competition. We also recently launched our YouTube Channel, Marketing Pro Trends,  which summarizes all of our blog posts.

FranchiseU!
FranchiseU! is for those in, or considering, careers within the world of franchising.

Listen on: Apple Podcasts   Spotify

Support the Show.

Subscribe to Side Hustle City and join our Community on Facebook

Speaker 2:

Welcome to Side Hustle City And thanks for joining us. Our goal is to help you connect to real people who found success turning their side hustle into a main hustle, and we hope you can too. I'm Adam Kaler. I'm joined by Kyle Stevie, my co-host. Let's get started, all right. Welcome back everybody to the Side Hustle City podcast. Kyle Stevie is remote this week. Kyle yeah, zoom in from the blurred background which I assume is his house. I think I see a fireplace back there, there, you go. We also got Kenny Cannon.

Speaker 1:

Kenny, thanks for joining us, man, we've been trying to get you on the show for a couple of weeks.

Speaker 2:

We're forward to it, thanks, thanks. All the way from Long Island, yep, unfortunately, unfortunately. We talked a little bit about it. Yeah Well, it seems like a lot of the New Yorkers are moving down to Florida now. There's like a just like a crazy amount going down there.

Speaker 4:

Well, here's the story behind that right. So we're a blended family. I was divorced 14 years ago, I think, or 13 years ago, So I'm kind of like I have a calendar next to me that counts down until the kids are 18 and it's Cocoa Beach time, for sure.

Speaker 2:

There you go. Yeah, my dad was in Melbourne So yeah, he wasn't far from Cocoa Beach and we would go down there. He lived down there maybe four years or something, but it was always good to go down there. And then I mean, if you're into surfing, that'd be a great place to go surfing too.

Speaker 4:

We are down there a lot. Actually, i don't surf, but I love to fish. It's like the one thing that I love to do, and our kids are homeschooled So we have the opportunity to kind of go whenever we want. So we spend probably about three or four weeks of the winter down in Florida every year.

Speaker 3:

It's awesome Yeah my daughter's dying for me to transfer down to our office either in Charleston or Port Latterdale.

Speaker 4:

Yeah.

Speaker 3:

I've been to.

Speaker 4:

Charleston too, and I liked that area a lot. The one problem I have with Charleston is the paper mill, if the wind blows the wrong way, freaking deadly. Oh, i didn't think of that. The smell is terrible.

Speaker 3:

It depends on where you're at in Charleston.

Speaker 4:

But like those islands, I forget the name of the islands.

Speaker 2:

There's some islands that are just south of Charleston that are beautiful Chinco Tig Island and there's another one out there. There's Chinco Tig and there's Isle of Bones Yeah, Isle of.

Speaker 3:

Bones Yep, yep, that's cool. James Island, james Island, yeah, there's really nice area down there. We're there every year for our vacation. My wife and my daughter are there right now, actually.

Speaker 4:

I like that a lot down there. It's nice.

Speaker 2:

So tell us a little bit about what you got going on here and what drives you. What got you into entrepreneurialism? You own the Virtual Closing Academy. We talked a little bit about it before the podcast here, but tell our listeners here what are you all about, what got you into entrepreneurialism?

Speaker 4:

Yeah, so basically, my company, virtual Closing Academy, we train high ticket closers and appointment setters. We're very mission driven.

Speaker 4:

The reason why I chose to do what I do is because I believe that if I can train someone to teach them how to close high ticket deals, then they can help a lot of people through that, because a lot of the people that I work with they end up in fitness offers or even like marriage offers or parenting or finance stuff like that And that can, If you teach those people the right skills, they can change the entire family tree and trajectory of the family, And that's why we do what I do. How I ended up in entrepreneurship for me it was kind of an accident. I've been selling my entire life and I believe that in business, sales is at least one of the most important things. I mean, you can get lead generation in there as well, I guess. But if you can't sell, it's going to be really tough to be an entrepreneur. So really didn't want to sell anyone else's stuff anymore, So I started to sell my own stuff and that's kind of how I fell into it.

Speaker 2:

Nice. Well, you're talking to the man right here, mr Kyle Stevie. He has to train. He has to train logistics brokers at TQL, which is what was second largest logistics broker in the country.

Speaker 3:

Kyle- I mean, i don't know, i think we're either. We may still be second, but we're closing fast Yeah.

Speaker 2:

So you got to teach salespeople all day.

Speaker 3:

I'm in sales. We have people that train under us, but it's not like the training class. They're working all day long and you just basically tell them, show them how to do the job and then after six months or so, they go out on their own and it's possible for finding their own book at business Sure, where you come in with lead generation. What was that? Sorry, i didn't hear you. That's where you would come in with lead generation, or teaching them how to generate the leads that they need to build their funnel.

Speaker 4:

Yeah, So what's cool about what I do is we don't actually do any of that. So all we do is sit on a calendar all day. That's pretty much it. So the product owner would generate the leads. they'll do the VS sales, they'll do the ads, they'll do all that stuff. My people just take the calls from them, That's it. All they do is take the calls.

Speaker 1:

And that's one of the things that a lot of people like about what I do is they don't have to do all the entrepreneur stuff like build the funnel. They don't even have to get results from people They don't have to create a product, none of that stuff.

Speaker 4:

That's done by the product owner And that's the thing.

Speaker 1:

That person is the expert.

Speaker 4:

So just let them be the expert, you be the closure, you be the salesperson and just help that person enroll and get the benefit of working with the expert and get the results they want.

Speaker 3:

Well, shit, let's walk through this thing, because I'm confused. This is what not ever being prepared for the podcast does for me It makes me learn. No, i like not knowing what's going on, so I can ask the questions as they pop in. So walk me through this. Who is your ideal client? Not your ideal client, your typical client?

Speaker 4:

Typical client is one of two people. It's either a salesperson already who mortgages cars, whatever, and they're just sick of doing the 12-hour days and they want to get something where they can make similar amount of money. First of all, we're not one of those people out there that we don't talk about Lamborghinis in front of That. whole thing is like you're going to make a good income 80, 90, 100, 110, if you're really good, 120, from home, about five or six hours a day just closing deals working in a calendar.

Speaker 4:

So we take salespeople from other industries and we put them into our program that they like that, and then also people who've tried all the other stuff the affiliate marketing stuff and the SEO stuff and all that stuff works, is all a place, there's a place for all of that, but it doesn't work for some people And this is something that I truly believe that if you just show up, you can get the result that you want, because it's a very weird industry. We have about a 30% complete lay down rate.

Speaker 4:

Like 30% of the people you talk to are buying. Even if you screw it up, they're just going to give you money, no matter what you do. If you get good at it, you can get 60 or 50, my fiance closes 85% of the people she talks to. It's something that anyone can really do if they just are willing to show up and put a little bit of effort into it, and I think that's what attracts a lot of people to it.

Speaker 2:

Okay, so explain a little bit about what they're selling. There's people out there that have no clue. You guys are both in sales, so there's a lot of people out there like, okay, i'm confused, how does this work? How do I get into it? What am I selling? Just go down that force really quick.

Speaker 4:

Yeah, so there's a lot of people out there who have what's called high ticket offers, right, so that's an offer, primarily over $5,000. And you probably everyone who's listening to this probably saw ads on Facebook that say something like book a call and we'll talk, or a free strategy session, or whatever, and it's in all different industries. So we have offers that do piano lessons.

Speaker 4:

We have offers that do photography We have offers that do any kind of health and fitness stuff relationship stuff but they're all over the place, tens of thousands of them, and they're advertising all over the internet. All we do is come in and take those calls. So when you see, that ad on Facebook.

Speaker 4:

That ad is running to a video sales center, then a calendar and an application usually, And then my people will go in and take that application and talk to that person about that offer, see if it's the right fit for them And if it is, they'll enroll them in the program, whether it's a $5,000 payment or whether it's a payment plan or they work out some sort of financing or whatever.

Speaker 4:

That's primarily what we do. About 80% of our job is figuring out how the payment is going to work. So whether it's going to be a $5,000 payment or a financing thing or a payment plan, that's primarily what we do. But it's never our own products. It's always other people's stuff, so think about it.

Speaker 4:

If the people that are listening are familiar with affiliate marketing, it's like that. But it's very high ticket prices and you don't have to generate any traffic. The leads are given to you and the prices are 5, 10, 50. I have someone with $50,000 offer right now Freaks me out a little bit, but they're doing pretty well All the way up to 50 grand and the leads are given to you. instead of you bringing the leads in, all you have to do is enroll them in the program.

Speaker 2:

Now, do you Does that make sense? Yeah, it totally makes sense. Do you guys manage the ads in the like the top of the funnel where these things are coming in from?

Speaker 4:

Yeah, no, so we literally do nothing but work the calendar.

Speaker 2:

Okay. Okay, so you're answering the calls. Are you doing emails too Like? are you answering?

Speaker 4:

Well, so you say yeah, that's a tricky one So sometimes we will So like in. I don't want to get too technical but like sometimes there's a software called well, any kind of CRM right, we primarily are using Go-High level and things like that, but any kind of CRM. So like sometimes 10 minutes per call will send out a text message through the CRM saying hey. I'm waiting in the Zoom room, so I'm like you know.

Speaker 1:

Here's the link again something like that, but other than that that's pretty much it.

Speaker 4:

You know, that's pretty much all we do. If someone's a no show which does happen, people don't show up to the call, Then what we would do is we'd set after the like, we'd wait five or 10 minutes something. We'll send them a link to reschedule if they want to, But like other than that, that's pretty much it.

Speaker 2:

And processing payments, And do you guys do now a lot of SaaS companies. So we you know I used to own a SaaS company and you know you always have a schedule, a demo, right. I've got SaaS. I've got companies that do SaaS stuff in the real estate space. Right now, probably long term I'd say over a year you're probably gonna spend five, maybe a little bit more, for their software, but all over their website book, a demo book, a demo book, a demo. Now do you guys train people at the call center then on doing like a Zoom and then like doing demos for these SaaS companies? Yeah, it's all the same thing.

Speaker 4:

Oh, nice Yeah it's all the same thing.

Speaker 4:

So we have people that work with agencies. We have people that work with software service companies. It's literally all the same thing when it comes to what we do Because, like sales, at its core is a transference of emotion, whether it's a demo of something, or whether it's just a script or whatever. It's me making them or the closer whoever it is making them believe what I believe is true, right? So if I believe that the software is the best thing for your company and you believe that I actually believe that, then my chance of closing you is relatively high. And, on top of that, if I can convince you that your current situation is bad, based off what you told me and your future-paced situation, when I say something like in six months, what's your perfect outlook Like? what does it look like? right, everything's perfect. What does your life look like? If I can make you believe that the only way to get there is through this software that I'm giving you, then as long as I tie that all together, you're gonna buy it every time very much.

Speaker 2:

Yeah.

Speaker 4:

Right. So if I could transfer that emotion, it works.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, so all you're doing is selling it When you have to go ahead.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, all you're doing is selling emotion. I mean, in marketing, that's all we do. We sell emotion, right.

Speaker 2:

You figure out who you're. I mean, and they've done a lot of this work already the your customers, at the end of the day, are businesses. They've done the persona work, they figured out what the emotional triggers for their customer and now did they pass those off to you? Do they say, hey look, we've done the persona work, we figured it out? or do you guys kind of take a different approach, or do you? is there a combination of the two? Yeah, so primarily it's done through an application.

Speaker 4:

So I'm going to know basic stuff. I'm gonna know I'm just a person's name, email address, whatever, but I'm gonna know how much money they're making right now. I'm gonna know what they want to and it's a finance offer, right. If it's a fitness offer, it'll be what they weigh right now, what they want to lose in six months. But, like I'm gonna know their current situation, where they want to be in six months or a year, depending on the application, i'm gonna know when they want to start. I'm gonna know I'm gonna say something in the application along the lines of like look to work with XYZ Coaching Company. It's a four figure investment. Are you willing to, already willing to invest in your business now? Yes, no, i'm open to financing. Those are all three options. So I'm gonna know if they have the money to do it, so they're gonna be a qualified prospect.

Speaker 4:

I'm not gonna know much other than that, though it's just the application. And a lot of times there are people that work with appointment setters that like they wanna send me the all my people, the conversations.

Speaker 1:

I tell them don't do that, because all that's gonna do is get in their head right. I don't want them to know anything that's been said. All I wanna know is the application person's name.

Speaker 4:

Put me on the phone with them and let me do my thing, And that's primarily what we get as far as information goes.

Speaker 3:

So I've been through this like it took me a while to wrap my brain around this. I don't know why it was so hard for me. So at the time, let's say, i was talking to someone, it was like a bank on yourself deal where you use whole life to finance things, whatever. This was like five years ago. I was talking to this guy and I was talking to him three or four times and there's a lot of qualifying questions and all this other stuff. And then, once we got to the point where it was like, okay, it's a go, my contact changed, i'm with someone else. So this is the same idea where you're qualifying.

Speaker 3:

They transferred you to somebody else Where like I qualified, i did all the qualifying questions, but it's kind of like what you're describing And then once I well, i guess hit the answers that they needed to hit to say, okay, this is a qualified prospect. They then put me to somebody else to close. I'm sure it's a different technique, but is it the same? is it the same idea?

Speaker 4:

Yeah, i mean, i would say it's, I guess, kind of similar, primarily though, with what we do. They're coming from a VSL that's telling them to book a call, then they're filling out an application, and then they're coming on the call and they're only speaking to that one person. They're not gonna be speaking to more than one person, unless there's an appointment set involved.

Speaker 3:

So you're doing the closing for the business owner then.

Speaker 4:

Yes, okay, the business owner directly.

Speaker 3:

Yes, all right. Is there The business?

Speaker 4:

owner too, is the business owner is not my customer. That's not the person that works with me. I work with the actual closers themselves. Okay, Yeah, so I have no contact with the business owner at all I mean, i do help my people decide, if it's because, look this is a dangerous business.

Speaker 1:

There's a lot of bad offers out there.

Speaker 4:

There's a lot of offers that don't get people results, you don't wanna work with them at all. So obviously I help them decide what's a good offer, what's not a good offer, based on how much results they're getting and all that. But primarily speaking, I don't have anything to do with the business owners at all. My job is to train the people to be good closers so that they can help the people in role in programs that are actually gonna help them. I got you.

Speaker 3:

Okay, sorry, wow Yeah.

Speaker 2:

So we got a lot of people that listen to this, that have they have side hustles now or they're thinking about doing a side hustle. What would you say to those people? I mean, would they be potential candidates for you See, like the way I look at it is a lot of people that start businesses, are good at whatever it is they do, but they are not good at sales. I've had so many people that have left the agency world, where I used to work for years, and they're like I'm gonna go freelance, i'll make more money freelancing than I'll make working here at this nine to five job. So they end up leaving thinking that they're gonna charge the same amount of money as these big giant agency with all these connections used to charge 300 bucks an hour, say. So they are gonna charge 300 bucks an hour, i'll work eight hours a day and I'll make this much money, right. So that's what they think.

Speaker 2:

When they get into it they come to find out they're not very good at closing, they're not very good at prospecting. I mean pretty much the ones that are sales pipeline. They're terrible at And they don't really know anybody because maybe they weren't great networkers and they don't just have word of mouth, business coming in. So I almost think doing something like what you're talking about, no matter what line of business you wanna go into, it might actually make sense to just like come work at a place like what you're talking about doing and get some sales experience. Get some on the phone sales experience, learn about sales funnels, learn how this stuff works, how to qualify leads, things like that. This would actually be almost like going to college for sales, but getting paid.

Speaker 4:

And what I believe is the most important thing is that you're wasting other people's ad budget instead of your own.

Speaker 1:

Yes, thank you, yes, all the time If you're going to start your own thing and I encourage all my people like, if you want to go out and start your own offer.

Speaker 4:

Start your own like do that, that's fine. But before you do that, waste somebody. Use that word waste somebody else's and spend and learn on their dime while you're getting paid. But my advice is this similar to yours, like is this is is what I do, the right thing?

Speaker 1:

It could be, I don't really know, but what I will tell you is this.

Speaker 4:

There are so many opportunities where anybody can go out and sell somebody else's thing. Just do one of those.

Speaker 1:

It doesn't have to be my thing, it could be anyone's thing, but do do one of those. Like you can go out there's there's insurance companies online. You take a test it takes you freaking two hours to do it. You take a test, you get your insurance license. Not that hard to do.

Speaker 4:

You go out and you get incoming calls all day long. Just get the reps in Some way somehow. Just get in front of people and try to convince them to buy your thing, whatever it is that's going to make you better, whether you're an entrepreneur or whatever that's going to make you better at what you do.

Speaker 1:

Whether it's something that I do, something else that doesn't matter. just get in front of qualified prospects and ask them to buy stuff.

Speaker 2:

The more you do that, the better off you're going to be. Howard Bauchner. Yeah, i just love that that strategy as a way for people to just kind of get their feet wet and sales a little bit. And you're right, you're selling other people's stuff. You're not even selling your stuff Like this is. You know you're not spending money on these ads. These ads are coming in and you're getting paid to close these ads. What's the average, or maybe a range percentage wise, of the deal that these salespeople are getting from closing these things?

Speaker 4:

Michael S, and that's the routine we see every once in a while. If it's anything above that, I usually tell them not to go with it.

Speaker 2:

Howard Bauchner. Oh, because it's some shady. yeah, it's going to be something, michael S, or it's brand new. yeah, howard Bauchner, or it's brand new And you don't want to go with something brand new.

Speaker 4:

it could turn out okay, but we really want systems in place Like I want people to go into, because again, most of this is learning right.

Speaker 4:

So we want to go into a process where the calls are set up already, the ads are running, the CRM is set up. we don't want people figuring it out because because that's not going to help my people at all right, I want them to go into an offer that's bulletproof already. So I want them to be the fourth, fifth, sixth, closer on the deal, not the first. So if they're offering 20% on a deal, that usually means that it's the first time they're doing it And that's not going to work out very well That makes sense 10%, 15%, max other than that it's probably not going to work out.

Speaker 2:

Nice, yeah, that totally makes sense. What are the? what do people normally closing Like? what are some of your favorite offers? Like I see every YouTube person right now is selling VPNs, like every single one. I'm selling Nord VPN Express VPN. Like there's so many VPNs out there. It seems like, like you mentioned CRMs before. How many CRMs do we need? I mean, there's got to be 30 CRMs out there. Yeah, that's true. I mean and, and you know Salesforce being the big dog, of course, but then you've got you know, especially ones like HubSpot and things like that. I mean even I guess you could even consider MailChimp as a CRM.

Speaker 2:

I mean, you know you're generating newsletter leads from some offer that you're putting on your website or whatever. But what are some of the good deals, what are some of the things, the products and I don't know if you can even talk specifics, but what, in your experience? what are some of the things people are out here selling?

Speaker 4:

if you could even answer that, yeah no, 100%, yeah, Okay, so so my my favorite offers in the world are fitness offers And the reason why that is is because you can totally see the transformation right in front of your eyes And that's the best thing in the world. You know that. That to me is. And just for full transparency, i don't close a fitness offer my fiance does but like once a month her product owner sends out to all of her closures, each deal that they close, a before and after picture of the people And what you see these women go through. It's primarily a woman offer. What you see them go through is unbelievable. So she makes 400 bucks a deal or whatever. It is 10% commission on 4,000 foreign miles. So she makes that and that's money whatever. But what really drives her is watching those women go from unhealthy and not confident and ashamed of themselves to, you know, maybe not miracle overnight, but over the course of a couple of months they're getting better and better.

Speaker 4:

She just had a deal the other day where the woman asked her husband to take the mirror out of her bedroom because she was ashamed to look at herself. Wow, the only goal of that coach was to get the mirror back in the bedroom. Now, after the second month, they had a picture of the mirror back in the bedroom. That's the transformation that I'm talking about, so that's why the fitness offers?

Speaker 4:

I love them and I love putting people on them. Finance offers are really good as well. I also love the like little stupid hobby offers. Like we have like photography, things that people do and piano playing and tennis and golf and all these little crazy things that no one ever think of.

Speaker 4:

But what we do. the beauty of what we do is that it works in any niche out there And a lot of times I think people try to start businesses online and they're boxed into. okay, i got to be an affiliate marketer, i got to be a product launcher, i got to be an ad person. With this you don't. There's so many offers in these weird niches that no one ever thinks about that. you can jump onto and you can talk to people about what you really like to do and you can make money doing it and you help other people doing it Interesting, yeah, so I mean, if you wanted to do affiliate marketing is an alternative to this?

Speaker 2:

Like, if you're thinking about doing affiliate marketing and we've looked into this and we've had affiliate people on the podcast too One of the most difficult parts of that is where do I put all these links? Like, where do I do? I got to write a blog. If I write a blog, then I got to know a bunch of SEO. I got to know how to structure a page. I got to know create internal links, create external links. I've got to write the copy. I mean I guess you could use chatGPG for a lot of this nowadays, but I mean it's a lot of work to be able to build this stuff up. You're posting things on Pinterest. I mean there's a bunch of strategies I think people use when they're doing affiliate marketing, but essentially popping links as many places as you could possibly can Reddit, anywhere you can, they'll let you put links. You put links right, but doing this doesn't require that Like you're handing the leads to them on a silver platter, essentially, and saying, hey, close this $5,000 deal, you're gonna make 500 bucks.

Speaker 4:

Right, yes, that explains it perfectly. Yeah, and I am the most anti-affiliate marketing person on the planet.

Speaker 2:

Just the answer No no, no this is interesting. I want to hear this Like what is your thing against affiliate marketing?

Speaker 4:

I'd love to get it, i think the worst business model ever created on the planet. It's horrible for everybody in almost every instance. There are two instances where it should be used, and that is it. I think people are getting taken advantage of by doing it. I think it's look, it's great for the product owner for sure, because you have a bunch of people out there working for free, spreading your message, talking about how great you are, and 99% of them aren't making anything. So that's fantastic for a product owner standpoint, but from the affiliate standpoint, it's terrible. Now, it works really well if you have a massive YouTube channel and you want to post links underneath your thing. Fine, fair enough. Or maybe you have a podcast, you want to post some things in there? That's fine too. Or the only other way that it works really well is if you're a product launcher yourself and you're looking for JV partners Right. So I'll go out and I'll say I'll promote your thing, You promote my thing, I'm gonna do that as an affiliate, he's gonna do an affiliate for me.

Speaker 1:

So there it works.

Speaker 4:

That's JV relationships, though, but as far as like, let me just go get a click bank affiliate thing and just go out and post it on Snapchat all day long. People don't have any money doing that, although those people that talk about that are trying to sell you a product, and my people are probably closing you on it.

Speaker 2:

So, yes, yes, but now you said it's great for people who are the product owner, so I own the product. If I come up with something maybe it's a SaaS product or whatever you're doing you want to sell this thing. Maybe it's, you know, vitamins from China that you white label or whatever You want to sell this thing. You contact you guys like Burberry, right, Burberry is like a thing right now, like a lot of people are into Burberry or turmeric.

Speaker 4:

I was actually just telling me that I play hockey and one of my teammates I mean he was like I take this supplement. it's supposed to cure everything And it's like most of that's what it was he was talking about that. Burberry.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, it's like great for your blood sugar and all kinds of stuff. But you know they, you want to sell Burberry and you want to sell turmeric, you want to sell cinnamon supplements. You need to go to China and you can get those things made and white label them, and. But now you got to build an audience. You've got to figure out a way to get people there. So you know, a lot of people are going to go on ClickBank or whatever and they're going to sign up for that And they're going to say, hey, i got a product, here's how much, and the margins are great on those. I mean, you're selling those bottles for 30 bucks and you're you're getting them for three bucks or whatever. Sure, so you can give somebody you know two bucks a bottle for everybody that clicks and it's a great deal for you. But I think doesn't like ClickBank and some of these other places. They take a cut and then you end up with only just like a small percentage of that right.

Speaker 4:

And if they refund, you get charged back.

Speaker 2:

Exactly. Yes, there's charge backs. Yep, that's right.

Speaker 4:

I always tell people if you're if you're sold on affiliate marketing, the best thing you can do is go be a car seller. Oh, because it's literally the same thing.

Speaker 2:

The only difference is you make a whole bunch more money, you get a demo and you get vacation and sick time and health insurance.

Speaker 4:

Yeah, Don't do that because being being an affiliate marketer for like JV zoo or something that it's not, and most of the you don't know anything about the product. That's the other problem. Most of the the products that I deal with five, 10, 15, 20 grand if they're around for six months and they're not in jail yet, it's probably pretty good And you're so these people with these $19 products. They're just coming and going every five minutes and you know there's 45,000 chat. Gpt products already and new ones launching every day.

Speaker 1:

You're going to be an affiliate.

Speaker 4:

You don't even know what you're getting into, and that's dangerous for your reputation, You know that's that's what worries about it with me too It's. It's a reputation issue too. You you can build a list relatively easily online. It's not hard to do. Use, I believe, you send one bad email to that list, No matter how much of a relationship you have with them, you're going to have a problem.

Speaker 2:

Yeah.

Speaker 4:

And that's scary to me. You know that's scary to me. That's why I just I stay away from it. I promote my stuff. Sometimes I don't even promote my own stuff really Well, like, i'll promote stuff like this on a podcast interview whatever, like that kind of stuff. Where I found a really cool video on YouTube I'll send it out to. But I don't send other people's stuff ever.

Speaker 2:

Pretty much to my list. What is the you guys are doing? mostly B2C right, do you? is there anything in your world where you're doing like B2B sales?

Speaker 4:

Yeah, a lot actually. Okay, Yeah, a lot of agency work. Oh, agency work So like Facebook and agencies. I just got off a call at at. I was five minutes before I got on with you guys. I got off the call with a call with a massive funneling media It's called they build funnels sales funnels for people that sell high-tech products. Oh, wow, okay.

Speaker 1:

They did like the guy did.

Speaker 4:

I think he did like 40 or 52 comic club award winners for ClickPhone. I might be messing the numbers up, but he did a lot of them And I just got on the phone with them five minutes before we started this interview. So, yeah, there's a lot of agency work. There's a lot of you know, we're doing something with solar right now where we're generating leads for solar companies all across the United States. That's another opportunity. So it a lot of it is B2C, but there's also a lot of agency work as well. The agency works sometimes can require more work from you, though. So that's more of like you may have to do a two-call close. You may have to follow up a little bit more. So it is a little bit of a different process sometimes, but it is definitely available for people that want it.

Speaker 2:

So so these companies out here, they'll build funnels for people, like a ClickFunnel type of thing, and they are driving leads to. Then to you guys So you know, i own an advertising agency, so I could hire one of the and we do websites and logos and all that. So we could hire one of these funnel building companies. What was the one that you mentioned?

Speaker 4:

Funneling Media Funneling.

Speaker 2:

Media. Yeah, okay, so we hire funneling media, right? Funneling Media builds us this funnel. We get so many leads or whatever a day 10 leads a day or whatever it is for our you know, maybe website package or for, like a reoccurring thing, $10,000 a month. We want to sell people on these marketing packages, so we want to sell them on that. So you guys would then take that call, the email would come in, you guys would pick up the phone, you give them a call or you'd email them back and try to get them on a call, right?

Speaker 4:

Yep, Yeah, So, so, so you would. You would hire one of my people. Oh, my people would approach you and say I was trained by Kenny's company.

Speaker 1:

I know how to close deals, do you?

Speaker 2:

have an opportunity for a closer And you would say, yes, you put it through your onboarding process and you bring them. Nice, So it's. so. you got one person you don't have. like, yeah, you know who this person is, You can sit there and chat with them and oh, wow, You wouldn't, you wouldn't hire my company.

Speaker 4:

My company just trains the people. I actually teach people how to find offers, So they're going out and finding it like they're going out and finding the offers themselves. I teach them how to find the offer and how to close the deal. And then so so they would be working directly for you, not for me. You would have, they would be an employer or a contractor of yours and you would put them through your training and you would pay them and all that.

Speaker 2:

Wow, which is nice, because then you've got that dedicated person and you don't have to constantly repeat yourself over and over again. is the like what you do? Once that person's trained up, they know what's going on.

Speaker 4:

Yep, yeah, it's not like a call center. And for the most part, you would have to train them a little bit on the offer, And that's pretty much it. You can. you can give them leads right after that and they'll be fine.

Speaker 3:

Sure, so you're okay Now at all.

Speaker 2:

Jesus Christ 45 minutes into this, kyle, come on, i'm just sitting here listening to the whole time. I'm like man, this would work for a bunch of like, maybe my companies or other people's companies that I know, you know.

Speaker 3:

No, as soon as he said, train salespeople going to your company. It's like this makes, this makes all the sense in the world. So it's kind of like. It's kind of like a quasi staffing service too a little bit, you get, you get, you get trained assassins to come to your company.

Speaker 4:

Yeah, yeah, yes, but I just want to be very clear that we do not work with the offers themselves.

Speaker 1:

What do you know? And the reason why I'm saying that is because there are some other people that do this right And they do.

Speaker 4:

They have a little bit of a different model. So what they do is they'll charge people to get trained as closers and then they will charge companies and say we have a whole bunch of closers, pay us 10 grand and you get access to our people. Yep, there's a lot of offshore people to do. I don't charge the companies, i don't talk to the companies, i just work with the people And I teach the people how to find those companies themselves. So they're not. They're not. They're not working with recruiters all the time, because I the way that I look at it is if you're dependent on me to get you an offer, then you're always going to be dependent on me, and I don't want you to be dependent on anybody. I want you to be your own person. I want you to be able to do it yourself.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, there's plenty of offshore companies that do the whole. Like hey, we've got just an entire room full of people in the Philippines that all they do is. You know they dial for dollars all day, or whatever they're doing, and they're trying to. They're actually trying to drive leads. They're not even I guess sometimes they could be answering the phone, but they're. They're out there trying to dig in leads You're offering this Yeah, you're.

Speaker 3:

this is a side hustle opportunity, He's got, he's got trained assess, he's got guys that know what they're supposed to be doing, how to do it, and then they, you know, they get trained up and they're kind of like all right, young paddle one, we've taught you what I can Now you go be a Jedi for whatever planet you want to be. Yeah, And we actually do like. we definitely do that.

Speaker 4:

And I always tell people like we can only practice so much, it's time to get in the game and like take real calls now. Right, but we meet every morning, like me and my people. We meet every single morning at nine o'clock. We do about a 20 minute just a rah, rah, sales meeting public thing. We meet once a week, wednesday nights. We call it script reading And we actually go through the entire script line by line, and I had everyone in the room do one or two parts and we do it every single week. So they're consistently being trained, even when they're on offers. They're they're meeting with me every day And we're going through the script all the time.

Speaker 2:

Where'd you cut your teeth at Like? where where'd you learn how to do all this And where'd you become the like, a sales expert, and get into a position where you know enough that now you can teach these people these skills?

Speaker 4:

Yeah, it's a good question. So when I was 15 years old, i opened up the newspaper because we didn't have all this cool internet stuff back then And I found an ad that said no experience to required unlimited income potential. And I was like this is the greatest thing I ever seen. So I went in and got hired on the spot And the person basically told me that he showed me two pieces of paper just like this And he said you're going to read this to them, and every time you get to the bottom of this and they say yes, you get 25 bucks. And I asked the guy a question. I said is there a limit as to how many times I can do that?

Speaker 4:

He never answered me, but he said you're going to be great Six months later I dropped out of high school because I was making about $2,500 a week doing that Nice, like that's the air. I went into stock business when I was 18, got my series 7, 63 when I was 18 years old. From there lasted a few years. There Firm's got shut down and on and on. Went into the mortgage business for a little while, sold cars for a few years. Started my company in 2007. Went through launching a whole bunch of different products. Settled on this about three years ago.

Speaker 3:

Wow.

Speaker 4:

And I always tell people I am not an entrepreneur. That is not what I do. I'm not a business person, that's, i don't know anything about business. I don't like business. It bores the crap out of me. I am a salesperson.

Speaker 3:

You're a process, you're a processes guy, i'm a salesperson, i want to be on the phone with leads all day getting them to buy stuff. Yeah, you have your process. You know how to get with people emotionally. You get on an emotional level, like you said earlier, and you help guide them to the correct choice.

Speaker 4:

Yeah, like I don't know, like accounting and like bookkeeping and HR, like that stuff is no real.

Speaker 2:

Nobody likes that. Well, what do you know that stuff like I've never had a logo.

Speaker 4:

in my life I don't have a business plan. I just kind of like sell stuff.

Speaker 2:

I met my actually my guy in Long Island. He's the only person I think I've ever met that actually enjoys doing that stuff. He gets excited about it. I'm like you do it, then Just go do it. Yeah, i don't touch it. That stuff seems awful to me, like I couldn't do it. So what kind of person do you look for? So everybody's listening to this, they're interested. They're like, hey, wow, yeah, i could, i could get on the phone. I don't have a problem getting on the phone. Like man, 500 bucks, like you make one or two sales a day and you're doing all right. What do you look for in a person? What kind of personality they need to have? you know to contact you and be serious, like you don't want crappy people who are just they want to beat around the bush looky loo, and you know you want people that are actually serious And I'm sure you've done this enough that there is a personality, type or a person, a situation that these people are in where they make the perfect salespeople.

Speaker 4:

Yes, so I can, i can describe the person for you. And you're right, i don't want I very strict with with who we? we filter out a lot of people because our success rate is extremely high. It's about 65 percent right now, which is unbelievable in this industry And I don't want to ruin that. So I do filter out a lot of people, but here's, here's the way that I can. I can describe this for you.

Speaker 4:

If you ever go to a supermarket or Walmart or whatever and you go to the register and the person's just like kind of like scanning the stuff and like looking down and like looks like he wants to kill himself, that's not the person that I want to work with. But the person who comes out is like, oh, i love that shirt, that's awesome.

Speaker 1:

Oh, i bought this last week. This movie is amazing.

Speaker 4:

I read this book, the person that's talking outgoing friendly bubbly. That's the person that I want to work with. When I was in the stock business, I got my series seven 63, so I'd sell stock. We had to hire cold calls. That's our first step after we open accounts.

Speaker 4:

The way we hired, cold calls, lead generators underneath us was we would go out to lunch and bring people back from McDonald's Subway, wherever we were The best cashier. we'd be like come with us, man, you'll kill it. It'll be a millionaire in three years, come with us. That's how we hired people. We take them off registers because that's the. in my opinion, if you're dealing with people that way and you're outgoing and you're talking to them, if you can just do that, reading this, instead of making $10 an hour, you're making 10 grand a month.

Speaker 4:

Oh wow, The interest is in waiters. to our another good one.

Speaker 2:

Oh, interesting.

Speaker 3:

Well, that's how we started, Adam. We were all ex-college athletes and former dock workers. It was basically guys that had time management skills from athletics and college or guys that did a grind of being on a shipping dock, yeah Well that's another thing too.

Speaker 4:

Athletes are really good at this too, because they're competitive by nature. I'm very athletic. I run all the time, i work out all the time. I play hockey. I'm pretty seriously still, even at my age I play him the whole life. But the competitive nature in sales works very well.

Speaker 3:

What position do you play?

Speaker 4:

I'm a defenseman but my team puts me forward all the time and I look lost out there, but I try my best I have plans to survive, though, so it's been a while.

Speaker 3:

I don't like playing out of position. No me, neither.

Speaker 4:

They put me at a wing and I'm like I know I'm supposed to cover the point, man, but like how deep do I go atop the circle? Like where am I supposed to go? But you know, i'm pretty quick on my feet, so they like the fact that I can kind of beat the defender out and try to go on breakaways every once in a while.

Speaker 2:

There you go. Well, man, it's been awesome. I think this is really really cool. Tell people, you know, if I'm out here and I'm interested in this. It sounds like something I might want to, i want to get into And I mean it sounds like a great side-house. I mean, you work when you want, you make as much money as you want, really, depending on how many calls you want to get on a day. You know, if I'm interested in something like that, how do I reach out? How do I find you Is there? you know, outside of just the website, you know, and you can give the website address, but any other ways that you you would people can kind of dig around and look, maybe your Instagram or whatever.

Speaker 4:

Yeah, so my Instagram is Kenny Cannon K-E-N-N-Y-C-A-N-N-O-N-98. Anything on Facebook, you can friend request me there. Talk to me there. I'm a very open person. I'm not like one of those people that has my name. Message me. I'll answer any question you have. You can also go to virtualclothingacademycom slash podcast and. I'm going to give you a PDF that kind of outlines the five steps that we do.

Speaker 4:

And that will kind of just let you know if it's for you or not, and you know, i'm not really, even though I am a salesperson, that's what I do. I'm not a pressure person. I know that this is for some people and it's not for some people, and that's totally fine. And the other thing that I'll tell you is this. Yes, this is a great side hustle, but it is also something that definitely can lead to much more than that.

Speaker 4:

It starts off that way. But, like I said before, if you're going to start your own thing, you might as well waste someone else's ad budget while you get good at it and get paid for it, so that when you start your own thing it's easy, because if you don't have to close deals, you don't have an ad budget Because you close.

Speaker 3:

This is what I would like to add to this. Finally, add something value to this freaking podcast. It said if you're going to choose this as a side hustle coming from sales, this is the one side hustle where the more you put into it, the more you're going to get out of it and you're not going to see anything financially from that part of it. You're just going to get better at being on the phone, Because when you're on the phone with people, you've got 15 seconds to make them want to listen to the rest of the phone conversation And if you suck at that first 15 seconds, you're going to suck forever And the only way to get good at it is to get hung up on like 500 times.

Speaker 4:

Yep, the reps, that's it. We never get hung up on them, like ever. Well, we don't, because they're scheduled calls.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, i understand, but you lose it. You still lose it.

Speaker 1:

Yes, You still lose it at sale, if you know the first part of the script. I hate this word, but the first part of the script is report.

Speaker 4:

If you don't do that calls over And I don't like the word report.

Speaker 1:

but the first part of the script is that because I believe reports build the whole time. It's not. It's not. It's not a box you check.

Speaker 4:

You start there and you build it throughout the whole conversation. If it's not being continuously built, you're losing it And that's a problem.

Speaker 1:

You can't close that report So if you, but you're right if you. If you missed that first part, it's over.

Speaker 4:

But people yes, i agree You have to get the reps in starts off as a side hustle. You can always do something else later on with your own business. But you, if you're going to be an entrepreneur, you have to learn how to sell stuff. You have to, there's no question about it.

Speaker 3:

You cannot be an entrepreneur and not learn how to sell, and that's the most uncomfortable thing for people to do, because even with, even with your, with what you've got going on, there's still the chance that they're going to say no at the end. People hate being told no until you build the call. So until you build that callous over your heart and soul, yeah, it's brutal, it's like, yeah, reps, reps.

Speaker 4:

That's it. That's the name of the game. Just keep doing it over and over again.

Speaker 2:

Love it, man Kenny. I appreciate you being on the show. Sir, This sounds a great idea and something a lot of people could could potentially do. It sounds like they got the right person teaching them. So congratulations with doing this and starting this up and helping people out, And good luck with everything, Thanks guys, thanks for having me.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, kenny, thanks a lot, man. Thanks for joining us on this week's episode of Side Hustle City. Will you've heard from our guests? Now let's hear from you. Join our community on Facebook, side Hustle City. It's a group where people share ideas, share their inspirational stories and motivate each other to be successful and turn their side hustle into their main hustle. We'll see you there and we'll see you next week on the show.

Speaker 1:

Thank you.

Side Hustles to High Ticket Sales
Sales and Lead Management Techniques
Learning Sales Through Other Offers
(Cont.) Learning Sales Through Other Offers
Niche Offers and Pitfalls of Marketing
Sales Strategies and Opportunities
Sales as a Side Hustle