Side Hustle City

The Art of Side Hustling and Wealth Building with an Expert, Doug Stevie

February 01, 2024 Adam Koehler & Kyle Stevie with Guest Dough Stevie Season 5 Episode 4
The Art of Side Hustling and Wealth Building with an Expert, Doug Stevie
Side Hustle City
More Info
Side Hustle City
The Art of Side Hustling and Wealth Building with an Expert, Doug Stevie
Feb 01, 2024 Season 5 Episode 4
Adam Koehler & Kyle Stevie with Guest Dough Stevie

Send us a Text Message.

Ever found yourself scribbling goals on a napkin, dreaming of turning those side hustles into your main source of income? Doug Stevie, a maven of entrepreneurship, sits down with us on Side Hustle City and shares his incredible journey of doing just that. From the nuances of real estate investments to creating memorable experiences through event hosting, Doug's stories aren't just motivational—they're a blueprint for blending a thriving career with robust family life.

Navigating the cultural landscapes of our cities, Doug and I traverse the challenges of real estate in diverse neighborhoods and share a jaw-dropping encounter that puts the unpredictability of urban living into stark perspective. Our talk turns to the savvy of financial planning, where we uncover the hidden gems of side income like adding laundry facilities to property investments. It's a masterclass in turning the ordinary into extraordinary revenue streams.

The gig economy landscape is changing, and this episode isn't afraid to explore its shifting horizons. We examine the appeal of fund investments over single syndications, take a deep dive into the Miami real estate boom, and even dabble in the cutting-edge worlds of cryptocurrency and AI. Doug's insights provide a launching pad for your entrepreneurial spirit—whether you're a seasoned vet or just starting your first side hustle, there's wisdom here that can propel you towards financial freedom and beyond. Join us for a conversation that's as much about building wealth as it is about charting a life of fulfillment.

As you're inspired to embark on your side hustle journey after listening to this episode, you might wonder where to start or how to make your vision a reality.  With a team of experienced marketing professionals and a track record of helping clients achieve their dreams, we are ready to assist you in reaching your goals. To find out more, visit www.reversedout.com

Everyday AI: Your daily guide to grown with Generative AI
Can't keep up with AI? We've got you. Everyday AI helps you keep up and get ahead.

Listen on: Apple Podcasts   Spotify

Buzzsprout - Let's get your podcast launched!
Start for FREE

Disclaimer: This post contains affiliate links. If you make a purchase, I may receive a commission at no extra cost to you.

Support the Show.

Subscribe to Side Hustle City and join our Community on Facebook

Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

Send us a Text Message.

Ever found yourself scribbling goals on a napkin, dreaming of turning those side hustles into your main source of income? Doug Stevie, a maven of entrepreneurship, sits down with us on Side Hustle City and shares his incredible journey of doing just that. From the nuances of real estate investments to creating memorable experiences through event hosting, Doug's stories aren't just motivational—they're a blueprint for blending a thriving career with robust family life.

Navigating the cultural landscapes of our cities, Doug and I traverse the challenges of real estate in diverse neighborhoods and share a jaw-dropping encounter that puts the unpredictability of urban living into stark perspective. Our talk turns to the savvy of financial planning, where we uncover the hidden gems of side income like adding laundry facilities to property investments. It's a masterclass in turning the ordinary into extraordinary revenue streams.

The gig economy landscape is changing, and this episode isn't afraid to explore its shifting horizons. We examine the appeal of fund investments over single syndications, take a deep dive into the Miami real estate boom, and even dabble in the cutting-edge worlds of cryptocurrency and AI. Doug's insights provide a launching pad for your entrepreneurial spirit—whether you're a seasoned vet or just starting your first side hustle, there's wisdom here that can propel you towards financial freedom and beyond. Join us for a conversation that's as much about building wealth as it is about charting a life of fulfillment.

As you're inspired to embark on your side hustle journey after listening to this episode, you might wonder where to start or how to make your vision a reality.  With a team of experienced marketing professionals and a track record of helping clients achieve their dreams, we are ready to assist you in reaching your goals. To find out more, visit www.reversedout.com

Everyday AI: Your daily guide to grown with Generative AI
Can't keep up with AI? We've got you. Everyday AI helps you keep up and get ahead.

Listen on: Apple Podcasts   Spotify

Buzzsprout - Let's get your podcast launched!
Start for FREE

Disclaimer: This post contains affiliate links. If you make a purchase, I may receive a commission at no extra cost to you.

Support the Show.

Subscribe to Side Hustle City and join our Community on Facebook

Speaker 1:

Welcome to Side Hustle City and thanks for joining us. Our goal is to help you connect to real people who found success turning their side hustle into a main hustle, and we hope you can too. I'm Adam Kaler. I'm joined by Kyle Stevie, my co-host. Let's get started. All right guys. Welcome back to the Side Hustle City podcast. Another episode Doug Stevie, hello, hello In the studio, here in, and Kyle Stevie, right across from you.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, Kyle, Nobody's gonna believe we're related yeah this is family, because Doug's very energetic, he's very happy, he's very, he speaks quickly. He's complete opposite. You guys don't look. You don't look like each other. No, we don't. We don't look like a no-hara. Oh, okay, yeah, he does. He got that long point in those.

Speaker 3:

Your dad looks like my dad, though.

Speaker 2:

Yeah.

Speaker 3:

So they were definitely, definitely brothers.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, this is a cool studio guys.

Speaker 3:

I like this.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, yeah. Well, we put this sucker together. I mean it's, you know, it's a room with no windows, so what else are you going to do with it? And padding on the walls? Yeah, that's for, that's for Kyle.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, put a straight jacket on him.

Speaker 1:

That's mainly for Kyle. That's not a, that's not a, that's not a, that's not a sound. This is just padding so. So, doug, yeah, we were talking a little bit before the show and, and you know, we were telling you a little bit about why we do this. And you've been all over the place. You've had some, you know, startup stuff that you've done. You've got side hustles that you've worked on. Now you're at a big co. You've been there for a while and there were some mergers, m&a kind of stuff going on with that, probably at some point with. Now you're with a big computer company out of Texas. You guys can put two and two together there and if you want to talk about them you can. Yeah, sure, like, yeah, just tell us a little bit about like what you know. How'd you get started? You're a Kentucky guy, you're part of this Stevie family over here.

Speaker 2:

Can I just can I just say, like the whole reason that I got into real estate and got into like, interested in entrepreneurship is because of Doug. Doug's seven years older than me, so I would go to Christmas and um Easter's and he would speak with our other cousins, the cars and they, the cars were they would like to do multi, not that would do like single family renovations and flips, and Doug was into buy and hold with the multi families and I I stupidly waited way too long to become part of it, but that was where the bugs started for me. So I've always Doug's always been the person that I I've always looked up to. Like you set your bar, like this is the bar that I have to achieve, that I have to reach for myself to be considered successful. No, so it's like.

Speaker 3:

Thank you for the kind words. I worked I, our family is awesome, and I never even look at myself as an entrepreneur. I um, I guess, when you look back on it, I I am an entrepreneur in a way, but I've always had the, the big main job right and I always wanted to do good at a main job. But I'm really big on writing down goals. Ever since I was a teenager, in grade school, I was right down what you want to do. Just write it down, cause if you, if you write it down, you actually use both sides of your brain. If you don't write it down, you don't. That's proof. I mean, there's a study and you can read about it. So when you write things down, it actually makes it come true a lot easier. So, starting way back, when I just wrote down everything I wanted to do from I bet you I have 150 bucket list items out there and I'd write things down and and even draw pictures of it, like I wanted to know what my first house was going to look like. Um, when I was like 19 and I didn't even realize it, but my first house looked like it. It was like right on it. So I think, being gory, and it was just something that started with you know, trying to do the things that you want to do, and my ultimate goal in life, cause there I always had like a uh, uh, an overarching goal and then I'd have a spiritual goal, then I'd have a business goal, then I'd have a fitness goals and I'd have maybe five or six under each one. And I'll tell you, you know, when you do the overarching goal, family was the most important. I mean, you got to keep that family and the spiritual part alive and that's always the overarching piece. But I think you can have a really successful career and really good family life and travel and do some entrepreneurial stuff If you just keep a good balance in your life and have fun at the same time. But you got to write it down. You got to know where you're going, otherwise it's like a leaf in the air. You're just floating around and you don't know where the wind is going to take you.

Speaker 1:

And I should have asked him to be in Legatus. He's got the whole spiritual thing. So we got we got this Catholic business owners group I belong to and it's kind of like how do we keep our business life, our family life and our just ethical spiritual life all you know together, how? How do we find balance and just bringing like-minded people together who are all kind of in that same mindset?

Speaker 2:

I'll tell you who's going to throw the parties. Yeah, dude, club Doug is legendary. Oh, here you go, it's legendary.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, we used to throw we still throw a lot of parties. That's the other part of it. You got to have fun in life.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, he had a geo tracker and his dad had, his dad has still and he has one down there too, a river camp towards Belterra and there was just cornfields on the opposite side. So they were like right along the river and it was just cornfields and they went through and ruined probably about $15,000 worth of crops and statue statue limitations. And it was just like this big circle. It was like children in the corn coming out Like so he would take the geo tracker With these big ass speakers and just start cranking it. And you just see all these teenagers come through the wood like get, like a field of dreams for it oh man. So you're like a 12 year old boy just discovering girls. Yeah, and it's just like 14 and 15 year old girls coming through this corn to like to have fun at this party and then that you know 20 somethings and stuff. You're like this is the greatest place I've ever been to in my entire life.

Speaker 3:

A little Motley Crue going a little poison.

Speaker 1:

Well, you get creative at the country, man. You don't really like in the cities. You know there's already places, right, like you don't. You don't make your own places, like there's places you go to to have a good time and get some of the fun and the creativity and the spawn spontaneity, a little bit of the stuff that you can do, like you know, field parties and stuff like that and people just go four wheeling and all that fun stuff that. Like you know, we went over my cousin's house. I got a cousin named Jim and Eddie.

Speaker 2:

Jim of course you do.

Speaker 1:

And they lived out in. It is the first time I've ever played Contra on the Nintendo, because we didn't have the Nintendo, we had the Atari. When the Nintendo came out, right and all black and white TV no bigger than this computer, right here, do you do the code Huh? Oh yeah, up, up, down down left right left right I watched.

Speaker 2:

Uh, yeah, I got caught in a Instagram thing of a guy running straight through the game and it filmed the whole thing. Oh yeah, interesting, he didn't die. I was like just ran straight.

Speaker 1:

Well, if you play it for years and years, you probably know where everything is at, you know where to do it, you know how to do it?

Speaker 3:

Yeah, he was, it was pretty awesome. Contra was sweet.

Speaker 1:

when I came out, dude, they jumped across those alligators and stuff and all that.

Speaker 3:

They jumped and they did flips yeah, they did flips yeah.

Speaker 1:

alligators, that was a part Pitfall, pitfall you used to love that. Yeah, but like I mean you two, you know we went out to their house one time. They live out in the country and they're just like hey, you guys want to go shoot crossbows and I'm from the city, like you, don't have a crossbow in the city right, like, and they're just shooting targets and having a good time and playing Nintendo, and I'm like, dude, this is a life out here.

Speaker 3:

This is great.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, what am I doing? Yeah, we got like real life video games where, like you're getting shot at you.

Speaker 2:

just look out the window. Yeah, there's drama outside right now. What do we need to do?

Speaker 1:

Exactly, so we had them problems, but it's funny, you guys are both from Kentucky and I got the most hillbilly accent of everybody here.

Speaker 2:

What are you talking about? Because you grew up in Prysil.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, we got that Appalachian like bubble that we lived in Our family's from Cincinnati.

Speaker 2:

They moved into Kentucky. Yeah, I think it was the OTR area.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, grandma grew up in.

Speaker 2:

Oh, really oh okay, they're in North College Hill.

Speaker 1:

Isn't it weird, like I don't know if all cities do this, but it's so weird how there's just like cultural divides everywhere here, geographic cultural divides, and you know, people from Ohio and we talk about in the podcast all the time never go to Kentucky and people in Kentucky never go to Ohio and I do it every day West West never goes east.

Speaker 2:

I've invested, I've invested a lot of money in real estate on that general theory that you give people what you can get, the OTR. But in Kentucky, and you always have a base of people because they just don't want to deal with the track, the parking and they don't want to deal.

Speaker 3:

When you did yeah, like that Fort Thomas area?

Speaker 1:

Yep, they do, oh, Fort Thomas is awesome for walking around and yeah, I mean I'm like, wow, this is nice, like I can. I don't know, I'd kind of feel soft if I moved there. I think I'd lose some of my edge.

Speaker 2:

You know there's a lot of fake tough guys there, yeah. Yeah, well, here you got to be like, you got to grow up down here we were always on edge.

Speaker 1:

We were always like man. Am I like? Should I like when I put my car in my house? I like still look around and like.

Speaker 2:

He had a mobile meth lab. He caught a mobile meth lab blowing up on his ring doorbell.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, right in front of our house, the guy's worth like wait a minute. Did I see that on the news? Was that on the news? No, it might have been on the news. I put it on Facebook for sure. Okay, yeah, I put it on.

Speaker 1:

Facebook. Four kids she's got and so she rolls up to the house in this minivan and we didn't pay attention. You know, and a lot of times there's somebody parked in front of our house. Well, and it's Cincinnati, so the houses are in people. If you're not from Cincinnati, you don't know. But we get these Italian eight buildings and our houses are like right in front of the sidewalks, are staircase. You got the sidewalk and then the staircase right there and this people park on the streets right. So she's pulls her her van up this shit hole of a van and right in front of our house, gets her kids out of the car, just walks over to her house and 10 minutes later I'm in the. I'm in my little room, my, my wife makes me go to so I could watch my TV shows, and she gets a big TV out in the living room and so she's sitting out there and I just the house shakes and I'm like what the hell?

Speaker 3:

happened literally right there.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, I'm like did a train derail Like cause we're not far from the trains, right? Or something happened Like, and so I go out in a living room and she's looking out the window, she's laying on the couch in front of this window and the car blew up in front of like. I'm surprised it didn't break the glass.

Speaker 3:

That's crazy.

Speaker 1:

So we look at the, we look at the ring camera. She rolled up with the back tire glowing oh my God Glowing and I think what happened is is I think she must have been brakes grinding or something, yeah, and then it caught something else and then blew the car up, it caught some oil and it spread and it caught the gas tank and the gas tank exploded. Whoa.

Speaker 2:

By the way, Adam's like the wealthiest guy in this room. Yeah, and he's. He's living in the ghetto on purpose. Dude, we upgraded the house, dude Like unless you picked it up and put it onto a tractor trailer and cut it out of the neighborhood. It doesn't matter. We just put new handrails on today. Look at that, I like it. Now it's looking sharp. I like the yellow door. And now it's section eight approved.

Speaker 1:

I like to live cheap. Like I challenge myself Like how cheap can I be? And I've never gotten over that mindset of like being poor Sounds like Elon Musk. Yeah, oh, dude, my shoe. I posted it on Instagram the other day. I big old hole in one of my shoes that I bought like five years ago. But I love these shoes and I'm like I walk outside the other day and it's raining and I felt wetness on my foot and I looked under my boot and I'm like, damn, there's a hole in my boot, right. So now I'm going to get them resold. But it's like I still got that mindset Like you don't throw stuff away, just make it work and all this other stuff. But I like compete with myself on how cheap I could possibly be. You know, I think, a lot of side hustlers and a lot of people that start their own businesses. Some people get all crazy. Like they say they raise money or they go out and get a loan or they get their first customer. You know they're like, oh, this is so much money. Like you know, I just did a project for a big company here, as one project took us a couple of weeks 25 grand, right, right. So that's it for that. And go out and bye a big TV after I do that, right, like I'm like, hey, I better stick this in here because you never know, save Next month might not be so good, right? So let me just keep this money in here, let me just keep this money stacked, stacked, stacked, right, and that's all I think. And I'm like how can I possibly live cheap, just in case bad times come? And where be prepared? And where are we at right now? Right, so quick, this economy turned around and people are listening and you get it. Like you've been to the grocery store and it's, it's kind of scary for a lot of people. And they didn't prepare. They had all this free money. What'd they do with it? Spent it. Why did we get inflation?

Speaker 3:

Because people couldn't quit spending all that free money that was in their hands.

Speaker 1:

Spend, spend, spend, spend, spend, spend, and now nobody. All that money they saved is completely gone.

Speaker 2:

Right, so yeah. So, doug, how did you build up your savings? Bring it right, bring it back in from the social.

Speaker 1:

Well, I don't know if that's how you felt, I mean, because I mean you guys didn't grow up with a ton of like.

Speaker 3:

no, I had to buy my bed and I use carpet in my bedroom. My dad, our dad's Kyle and my dad we their mom and dad grew up through the depression. I mean it was a really really bad, rough time for them. They lived in an apartment up on on Roe Street for a long time. So I think both of us were raised to be very cautious of how you spend, save your money, and I still feel a little bit of that. I spend sometimes on stupid things. But you got to because you got to have fun. You got to have that balance, like I said, because if one thing's out of balance, you're going to fall apart as a person. You just are. I mean, like at Tiger Woods, he was great. All of a sudden, what happened after the divorce? Started having a lot of problems and then all of a sudden he's in a wreck. His problem. I mean you got to have the whole life in balance, otherwise it's going to fall apart Period. But how, how did I do it? I mean I, I really just started wanting to be I could. I found out in high school you can ride your bike to go make money. Wait a minute, I can go somewhere to do it, and then I'm riding my bike, I'm doing all this. I started saving money and then in college I realized, you know what, I should start getting into this real estate business. And just look at, you know, buying a fourplex, buying a house, rent it why not do that? Or buy a duplex? I really wanted to buy a duplex and then live on one side and the other, but it just didn't work out at the right time. So what I did is I got this job I mean, I was still in college, got married, but I had all my goals and I remember there was this fourplex for sale I'd only have one sale at this company called Icon, which was like a Xerox and I took all the commission. It was like 10 grand. I mean it wasn't much, but you know, the mid 90s that was a lot and I found this fourplex and instead of spending the 10 grand, I put it all down on this, this fourplex, and it was a nice one in Florence, not like a run down one, so it was really nice. And I was scared. I mean I was scared to death. But I knew this is what I got to do to get started. So I did it and then bought another one over time, and then another one, and then I got a relationship with some builders and started buying brand new homes and renting brand new homes. So I'm on up heaven, I don't know four or five brand new homes and then I'd buy some used homes. So, at one point in time, I don't know I had like 20, 25 units between the sixplexes and the fourplexes. One of mine was right there where the new hospital is coming down the cut. Oh, yeah, yeah yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah. And that worked out great because you know, if you just get enough real estate in the right areas and you manage them right, things happen that you don't expect. You're not even planning on it, because what happened? Yeah, they'd expand at 12th Street, right, and then they, the city, bought it back and they bought it for way more than I bought it for. So good things happened there and that was the beginning. That's how the beginning of real estate side happened, you know. And then just to kind of continue, if you want me to Well, and this is what I tell the kids too.

Speaker 1:

So real estate, when I go talk to them at the school, as I said, buy four family, just get a four family. Get it for one bedrooms, because those are probably the easiest, I would say, to manage, because usually get like an older woman or something who's by herself. They're going to be in there, they're not going to have a lot of people over because the place doesn't have a lot of space and you can live in one of those units. You got three people in the other units and it's going to. It's going to pay for itself, plus you're going to cash flow. So the problem with buying real estate like your own home is that that's a liability, that's a 100% liability. You're paying right now I just looked at a stat 3,500 a month for the average person to own a home right now, 2,500 a month to rent. So it's actually more affordable to just rent than it is to buy anything and build equity. So go out and buy four family, just own it. You just own it, move into one and you're actually making money.

Speaker 3:

But be smart about it too. I mean, for anybody listening, I mean I was 26 years old when I bought that. It's new. I mean, imagine what you feel like when you're 26,. You're just starting everything, you don't know what to do, and so you start leaning on a lot of people. So you got to surround yourself by people you can trust, yes, otherwise you can get yourself in some big trouble. But incorporating, because if something happens in that apartment and someone wants to come after everything that you have, then they're going to have to do your wife's stuff, your kids stuff, everything. So just incorporate, protect yourself. So I had some really good friends that are lawyers, just like my cousin over here, and they taught me these things. So incorporating you have multiple corporations. Just, I was just be smart about it and that's what you did and are you doing an LLC.

Speaker 1:

How are you building that out?

Speaker 3:

How would?

Speaker 1:

you recommend the structure.

Speaker 3:

For the apartments. It started out as LLCs, but then what we found in apartments is there's laundry equipment in the basement, right, and you can either just let people bring their own or maybe you might want to put some down there and put the little coin changers in there. And that's what we did in the one here in Covington and it was a six plex and I made we as my wife and I, we made more money with the laundry equipment and profit in the basement than we did like on the profit month to month, not including appreciation and stuff. But that made a lot of money just in the that one washer and dryer in the basement I couldn't like. Every three days I had to go pick out money and I was like whoa and the light bulb went off. So I started interviewing all these different owners because there's really, if a lot of mats for sale, it's rare, but when they are, typically sometimes they're not in the area as you want them. So I started interviewing the guys and the ones I want and it took about a year and a half. I'd take them to lunch probably every three months, just became friends with them and wound up buying three of them over I don't know four or five years, and I'll tell you that was one of the best things that I got.

Speaker 1:

I want a laundry mat, Like I keep saying it, like it's got the lowest failure rate out of any business, like the number one Dude he's got the best.

Speaker 2:

he's got the best set up right now for a laundry mat in history. So he's got one close to their camp, but you still have NKU. No, no, not the NKU. Oh yeah, the one in Warsaw, kentucky. That one's great, but you've got to actually operate that one, the one he's got in Warsaw, and you can explain this if you want to. I just you asked me at Christmas, you did. When you think about the steals like that's the greatest thing I've ever heard in my entire life, you know you like when you get strategic financing or you think about I want to buy this house but I don't have the 20% to put down. The owner owns it outright. Probably maybe he'll act like the bank and I just got to put 10% per 10% down and he'll we'll set the rate between us and all this other stuff. Yeah, he's doing that with the laundry mat business right now.

Speaker 3:

Oh nice. So it's really nice, that one down there. I guess we got about five years left on that particular one. We're the bank now, so we're going to, we're selling it, but we still own it. But he's paying for, he's paying us but he has all the liability, he has the lease, he has all that now. So it turned into a really good business becoming a bank. So we gave him the money and then he gives us a deposit and then you get a lot lawyers to draw up a nice contract and now we're just in the process of selling.

Speaker 2:

But it's over eight years and if he doesn't pay, then you get it back and he gets out, and then you start all over again.

Speaker 1:

So it's like a, a lease to own, kind of in a house.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, With some really good terms in there and for him, but also for us, you. You miss your payment and it is what it is right, so you get it back. So that turned out to be pretty good and I really liked that business. So kind of you know, you can kind of see how it morphed from. You know the basic stuff in high school that you do save your money, get into the apartment business. That gets the the wheels turning all the while you start doing this laundry stuff in the basement. That's gets the wheels turning a little bit more. Then you start looking at it. But if you've noticed a theme here, everything I do because we got in the vending too, so an ATM machine that's another one.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, that's really good. None of them have employees.

Speaker 3:

So and if they are employees they're 1099. So because there's contractors are going to come in and clean and if you want to, really for me, I didn't want a business where I had to manage a ton of people and that they had to be on payroll, because payroll does introduce a lot of tax things. And I did have them on payroll for a while but it was way easier to do the contract route and go 1099s. So that has worked out. So just wonderful being able to do that. So, moving from there, we did the ATMs. So then we had about 12 ATMs out there, Did that for a number of years. It's profitable. But I sold that business because it's kind of hard to manage and that was starting to eat into my regular job. Remember, I'm working 60 hours a week at EMC at the time and now Dell Technologies is bottom. So I work for Dell. You can't take away. I mean literally I might spend an hour a month on the laundromat. Maybe, yeah, Maybe my wife does a lot of the collecting. And then I have people that I trust, like my dad or really good friends or the people. Those are the ones that might touch money. And then you know you have to have people to hire for cleaning and stuff, and those are high school or college or older people that are just retired. So that worked out really well to be able to have a little bit of family, people you can trust to handle the money. But that morphed into when you did the ATMs. I had to do it. I mean, I had to be there and like fill a machine up every other day and they're all over the place Pain in the ass, yeah, and then someone will hit it with a sledge hammer and try to break into it and then you're stuck there and then you got to go buy another one. So I just got out of that business and then started into the REITs, the private REITs. And I don't know if you know Larry Connor, no, the Connor group, it's up in Dayton Ohio. That was one of the best things. So, Larry Connor, there's got to be Pat Rini, Pat, if you're listening. Hello, Great guys. Pat was. It was such a good time in my life to meet him because it's a private REIT which operates under totally different rules than a public REIT, right? So they don't need to spend the money right now. They can wait and do the things.

Speaker 1:

Find the REIT project.

Speaker 3:

Find the REIT, Buy at the REIT time, but get in and pull your investors in and buy these enormous complexes in Atlanta and Houston and Columbus. But like this wouldn't have happened if you don't just keep surrounding yourself by good people.

Speaker 1:

And you hear things I just actually heard. So there's a guy he's. I went to his fund conference down in Miami and he's all about creating funds, not single syndications. So this is a little bit it sounds like what you're talking about.

Speaker 3:

Single syndicators are getting yeah, a lot of them are getting crushed right now. So the Connor group is. I mean, they have multiple funds, but the way they operate and I like it because it's kind of how I did the laundromats you have people that run businesses in a way that they feel like they got to be there. They're emotionally attached to it, so they feel like they have to be there. They got to be a part of it. Instead of automating it, use technology to automate it. Bring in the technology, so you got cameras, auto locks, and then I don't need to be there. Neither is my wife, so you can take yourself out of it and run it better and increase profits. That's how Connor group does their business. And this isn't a commercial forum, because it's just not. But I started investing with them a lot and then a lot of my, the people around me, started investing in them and that has been one of the most profitable things that you know. You get your, you get your K ones and you get all the stuff back, so you're a real owner, but you don't have the operational day to day stuff and it was it was great. And I know, kyle, you were looking at doing that for a while on some stuff too, I think, yeah, I was. And then I got married yeah, cause I remember you talking about that. I'm like God, this sounds just like the Connor group. So yeah, if you type in Connor group, larry Connor he's one racing.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, I was. I know I was talking about, um, yeah, yeah, sorry, that was. It was the night that I just barged into your, your camp. I remember that that was a lot of alcohol into that. So let me remember we were talking about 10 XDS. I do remember that, and, uh, it was. It's different. I'll explain it later, but my book is uh, uh. Uh is how the Connor group, since they're a private REIT, um, I don't know how they go about with getting in and out of the trust as, as you need to say, you've got. Uh, last I talked to you is like a 75 K buy-in or something.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, I think it's like 150 now, but you can do it with partners so you can have like four people go in if you want to write. But if you needed, to pull 15,000 out.

Speaker 2:

You're too right. So what? What is happening now and then this is what my book is about is that um and this is goes across all private asset classes, artwork um she takes it and then monetizes it and pieces. They're the, they're the glue between. So, let's say, Templam is a broker dealer and they're a market maker, so you would tokenize your ownership. So it's not like it's not crypto currency, it's just a digital, digital representation of your equity in a property, got it, or your debt position, whatever it is. So you say, okay, this is gone. Those, this property is now valued. I've realized a 15% gain in my original investment. I want to take that 15% and I want to put it into something else. Right now, you can't do that with a syndication or anything, because it destroys the whole structure of the entity. Whatever. Whoever the special purpose or equal is, this will permit them to tokenize at the beginning and give you your equity shares and allow you to trade across these private, these private secondary markets. So, like templum and you go to Merrill Lynch or you go to somebody else, what 10 XTS is there? The glue be below behind that so that there's, you don't have to worry about your share a that was tokenized using over here templum. You don't have to worry about it being duplicated on these different places, right? It's all sits, it's all sits right here and every time it gets traded, if you take it off of templum and you get, you take it to your money manager and they do it off of their broker dealer mark, whatever market they created their alternative trading system, all those trades need to be recorded to be compliant with the SEC. That's what. That's where the glue is.

Speaker 3:

Sounds like you know a little bit about this. Yeah, I know, maybe a book or something, yeah maybe you should write a book.

Speaker 1:

I did, nobody bought it. Well, in this kind of group here, what led you to this, like how you were saying that you've talked to people and you just kind of were in real estate circles, right, and they said, hey man, why don't you look at doing this?

Speaker 3:

Yeah, you know I think it all comes down to, you got to know where you're going and what you, what you want in life. So you know what day you want to retire. How would you want to be? Because I mean, ask the question, you know how old and for you you can retire today, probably right, but a lot of most people don't know how are you going to get there? And in my mind, just asking those questions and writing them down had me talk them with other people about it that were just my friends or my customers at work, and then they would bring up things. So just the sheer fact that you know where you kind of want to go in life and what you're doing makes you talk with people about it and then they would bring up things and people brought up kind of group. Just turns out that one guy's like oh my gosh man, you should go talk to this one. I mean, I know you're in apartments and I know you like that dirt. That's what they do, but they do it on this bigger scale. So that was from EMC back in the day, and then I talked to my work friends about it because I didn't know if it was a good thing or not. I had to learn, so leaning on good people, and then you know, it wound up being a really good investment. I think I got in like four funds and I'm still in them. So you know that turned out really good, what kind of?

Speaker 1:

so you get in these and they just pay an interest rate. Is that? Is that kind of what it's different.

Speaker 3:

Like you know, let's see if you got in, like in 2002, you know, building up to 2008,. Oh my Lord, those were enormous, enormous returns. If you got in in 2007, might not be so good, but they still, by the time 2013 rolled around after the 2008 market crash, you're back in, you're back in a good spot and then you just stick with them and they're 10 year investments but it worked out really well While you're doing your apartments, while you're doing the other things that you're doing. But if you want the family life, you can't have things that are going to take a lot of your time. You got to have people that are going to manage it for you and that means you're not going to make as much day one. So kind of bringing it back to what we were saying Family's first. I'm traveling with work a lot, so I can't manage these things, and you got to have people around you that you know you can lean on and then just keep having the next plan I want to park a lot. I really want to buy a parking lot, but how do you get a parking lot? So I've been thinking about that lately.

Speaker 2:

The perfect place to buy one, too, was in an opportunity zone. Because you can. You don't you have a property qualify for. You know opportunities, opportunities, yeah. So for those that don't know, donald Trump whatever you think of them created this. I forget what the act was, but in 2017, it basically said that local, local legislators were able to carve out areas of their city that they wanted to get redeveloped. You could go into these properties or businesses that were domiciled in these areas and, as long as they were put into this legal structure of an opportunity zone fund, you could take your money and you could invest it Right, but they had to be capital gains. So you sell your Apple stock. You buy a building Now you can't just sit on it like a deadbeat. You have to put the. You got to have to put the same amount of money into it that they never really specified how much a substantial amount was, or whatever they, however they, termed it, but the idea was that, having talked to enough attorneys, is that it's basically, if you buy for $200,000, they expect $200,000 of improvement. If you do that, the capital gains tax that you would have paid for, let's say, a million dollars in Apple stock is now, is now not doing for another five years and when it is due, it's due at like 85%. It was 85% originally, Now it's I think it's 75%.

Speaker 3:

So you get the time value of the money and not as much at the end that you got to pay. It's such a good deal, correct.

Speaker 2:

And then when you sell the property that you, that you used your funds for, that's tax free, no capital gains when you finally sell it. So the parking lot, the parking lots for big, because all you got to do is put put new asphalt down and you've done a substantial. And you've got this you bought a parking lot in this area that's just seen its real estate values go through the roof. People are going to be looking for parking. If it's a, if it's going to be an area that's up and coming right, potentially they're going to want to build a parking garage on there, especially by a venue.

Speaker 1:

Oh wait, I got a parking lot. Now I rent these spots out to on neighborcom, so neighborcom is another side hustle that I do, that's perfect.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, and I, literally a guy, parked two cars right out here today and and uh, it is separated from this building and you need to put it into an opportunity to have fun.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, $65 a month, um per car. I mean I got like six cars or something. It's not a big deal but shit, $65 a month, six cars, I think I'm up to I don't know how much. Over the years I've made like thousands, like a couple thousand bucks.

Speaker 3:

I like that, that is, I was just thinking of this driving down the road. I don't even know what made me think of this. I would love it. Maybe the apps out there? I just haven't searched this yet, but it just pops. These things pop in my head all the time. I want, I would love to just rent somebody's car for two weeks. It's a Corvette or it's a Porsche. She's talking to the guy. Two weeks, two weeks. What is it called? Turb, turb and it's.

Speaker 2:

It's Airbnb for cars, that's what he does, he does it with his.

Speaker 1:

Genesis, I don't even have to pay my car payment anymore. Like I got so many people renting it for 200 bucks a day and I think last year I made like 11 grand off of it, and then this year that is like seven grand. I want to do that Well, and it's not just Turro that's doing it. So now Uber is getting into it. So Uber, you know you can rent. You know you just call them up and somebody comes to pick you up. Well, now you can rent your car to someone like a daily car rental or a few hours or whatever, and Uber is going to start doing that. So now, if you want to rent your car out, now you've got Turro and pretty soon it's in Boston. Right now they're testing it out in Boston, but pretty soon you're going to have Uber also, that you can rent your car. And so now you're going to have two platforms, and one of them's huge, everybody uses it already. And I'm sure, Lyft won't be far behind.

Speaker 3:

There is money in that for the people who want like the sports car for a week or two.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, you're going to Florida. We did it in Florida for SUV, but the guy had two separate divisions. He had his like SUV, family size cars, yeah and then he had Tesla's Tesla division.

Speaker 3:

I'm just going to just look at it. I like that Some.

Speaker 2:

Ukrainian guy.

Speaker 1:

That is really cool. Past six months 987 bucks I made rent in this parking lot out. See, that is perfect, that's 12 months. I made $2,000 last year.

Speaker 3:

So those are the things that I just been thinking of on the side, because this is like obviously a side hustle.

Speaker 2:

So we got another one for you, since you're so comfortable with vending machines.

Speaker 3:

Oh, no, I've been into those a while.

Speaker 2:

There's a guy that there's a. They've been on here twice and they take ice machines like, yeah, Scotsman ice machines, but they're these big ass. Then they run through this UV felt.

Speaker 1:

I was just thinking about that again.

Speaker 2:

And running the water through it before I got it Right, but it also. You see, you can fill up water bottles because it's double purified water, yeah, but they also have these top of the line ice machines and you can fill up a whole cooler. You can say I want eight pounds of ice. Instead of you either get what? Seven or 22 pounds? Yeah, smaller big bag yeah, you do the in between and it's made right there in that machine so you don't have to worry about going in the back of a truck and whatever fumes are getting into that ice, no matter how much they say that it isn't sure as shit is. Yeah.

Speaker 1:

And you like? What if we partner with Kroger?

Speaker 2:

That's the hard part.

Speaker 1:

We decide we're going to go out here and we get somebody who knows sales goes into Kroger and says look, you need you need electric, you need water and you need a squirt.

Speaker 2:

You need to say little.

Speaker 3:

Basically, you're just walking up to the train putting your thing and then boom, you get whatever poundage you want. Swipe the cart, yeah yeah. And these Gen Zers, as they're growing up, they want convenience, easy.

Speaker 1:

You put it in their apartment complex.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, you put it in their apartment complex. That's what that guy in Florida did.

Speaker 1:

He just he puts it in his, his apartments down in Florida. And what are people doing in Florida? They're going to the beach, they're bringing a cooler, they got a whole bunch of beer, they're going to ice up, they're going to go to the you know the hotel they're staying at and they're going to fill it up with ice and off they go. Well, what he does is he just replaces their old, crappy ice machines with one of these things, yeah, and then he, he pays them rent to put it there 200 bucks a month or something like that. I think it's great, yeah, and it's several episodes ago, but you could do that Like everything is some of them were everything can be done that way.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, some of them like what the average was. Something was grossing not netting, but grossing somewhere around 35 K a year.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, for one machine.

Speaker 2:

And it's 50 grand.

Speaker 3:

Sounds like there was this one business. A research hit and found out that they were doing it in Florida and you could. When we had three kids we have three daughters I have me and Tanya and I and when they were little you would go to the pole. We'd be there all the time. What's the worst thing that you got to do? I mean, every time you go to a pole you got to rub them down with a ton of sunscreen, right, right, when you get there, and then it's like it's expensive too, the spray on stuff, yeah. So I was like man, wouldn't be great if they like had a wand over here and you could just like, almost like a car wash, just put your car and go paint the house real fast. Yeah, just get it done real quick and then you're out. That was I. Just I could have done it and I didn't do it because it was going to take too much time. So time was the non-renewable asset, right. So I didn't do it, but it was going to be a money maker.

Speaker 1:

Well, kyle wasn't on this and we haven't launched this yet, but there's this guy, this website called levelfieldsai, and he was just on my podcast and I'm going to sign up for this. So it's like $19 a month and this dude was super cool, like you could tell. He was just like a regular guy, but I mean, he's like a data analyst. He worked at the Pentagon. He created these systems at the Pentagon to identify risks and all this other crazy stuff, right. So he created this thing and it like scans the internet for new, not just the internet, it scans a bunch of stuff for news on stocks so that you can act on the stock news before anybody else does.

Speaker 3:

So it's almost like a Reddit, but faster but faster, yeah, and it's like you.

Speaker 1:

That's how you make money. There's that edge right there. That's your edge right Is the news and you look at, you watch shows like billions and all that other stuff. That's how they got an edge. That's how these hedge funds get an edge. Well, this is hedge funds. Stuff Like this is what hedge funds use and he just democratized it. It's with all the stuff that's happening right now. Oh, you want a.

Speaker 2:

You want a nice car, you rent it on tour. That one's actually affordable.

Speaker 1:

Oh dude, it is affordable too, and it's like, why wouldn't?

Speaker 2:

you. It's like 20 bucks a month, dude, like $160 bucks for level two.

Speaker 1:

But like, seriously, this is why not Like and these are the things like, the good things about having this podcast and guys at home if you listen to the podcast for a while everything we had.

Speaker 2:

So many freaking awesome guys come in.

Speaker 1:

And they're.

Speaker 2:

Everybody's been super like open about explaining and you know you ask questions where their heads are and how they got there, well and that and, but they're actually answering questions honestly. So like we'll, we'll ask questions, or like I don't get it, yeah, they'll explain it to you at a like a sophomore level.

Speaker 3:

Do you remember the the uh Tilray stock? Oh God.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, Tilray. Do you remember when Reddit just hit it?

Speaker 3:

go like phew shot way up. That's like I was on with him. You're on with this. There's another guy.

Speaker 1:

This is a different guy, but he's cool too. But he's doing the credit spreads with the options.

Speaker 2:

I didn't understand that at all. Yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah, you don't have to.

Speaker 1:

That's why you take his classes right and, and you know, explain it more. But I had another guy on that does focus groups and you know your corporate guy. You get it Like when you're coming out with a new product you need to do focus groups. So you put your profile on his platform and he's searching it and people are coming on looking to hire you for focus groups. And literally 15 minutes to make 50 bucks just doing a survey. Just doing it, yeah, and they call you up and you do these little surveys for 15 minutes and I'm like, wait a minute, that's great. He's like, yeah, I got guys on my platform that are making 10, 12 grand a year just doing surveys because you're a subject matter expert.

Speaker 3:

All right, I need all three of those. It's going into a system and then it's using that. Uh yep, I need you to shoot all three of us.

Speaker 1:

Oh, yeah, yeah, and he's on. Uh, his, his episode was, I think, two or three episodes ago, but by the time people listen to this it's probably like six episodes ago. Um, but yeah, I mean it's, it's. You know, these things are like so many things you could do that don't really take up a lot of your time. Like you said, you want to be able to take care of your family. You know you don't want to be digging around, but a, a shriek shake was his name and it was the November 27th episode. Um, but yeah, I mean, and the guy's super cool. The funny thing is is so we're in startups, right, like play around with startups. He said I was like dude, you should come here. Man PNG, like they're constantly doing consumer testing and all the investors here understand the world you're in. He's like oh, I can't. I can't raise money in Cincinnati, and I'm like why? He's like because if you're in San Francisco already and you go to Cincinnati to raise money, they think there's something wrong with your startup, because why wouldn't you just raise money here? Right Is what his point was. It's like we've got all the money in the world here in San Francisco, practically. Why would you go somewhere else and raise money?

Speaker 2:

Yeah, they've got so much that they've lost billions of dollars over the last half of the year and they're still looking for opportunities to invest.

Speaker 1:

They got to.

Speaker 3:

They got unlimited money to set a situation out there.

Speaker 1:

Well, and you got Silicon Valley bank situation and all that our stuff and it's, it's wild, but we did dude every once in a while and I'd say everybody that comes on our show is doing something that we could take part in if we wanted to spend the time to do it.

Speaker 3:

Tell me what you think about this one, and they're already doing it. It's already out there. But if you really put our focus, we don't have a ton of it around here. A company that does IVs at your house? Yeah, and you know. You just, it's on an app. You just go and say, hey, you know what it's, I'm hungover man, the Gen Zers, right, they went to a party just bringing the IV. You got nurses on your team. They give you the IV. You feel really good the next day or that even that day, because Gen Zers don't want to wait, they want immediate gratification right. Right now.

Speaker 2:

Everything has to be right now. Right now, a guy from my Jiu-Jitsu gym is a firefighter and that's his part-time job.

Speaker 3:

I think that is a great model. And the advertising Get it online, get it really popular around here. I think that could be a good one.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, yeah. Well, I think you know you've got a lot of things that are available. Now you you realize I can get on my bike and go do something. We had a the British guy that was just on the show. He was doing side hustles when he was a kid All right, he was the number one.

Speaker 2:

he was the world's number one mentor for CEOs. Oh really, yeah, Some British guy. He never went to college, so at the end of it he was talking to us and I was like, ah, I get it. I get it because he was a no bullshit, Like one of those tough physical things like yeah, personal trainers that just like treats you like shit, but in a loving way You're like you are fat.

Speaker 3:

You'll get on this treadmill. You know who you should get on this and I think so highly of this guy. He's such a great guy. All right, john Sanchez. Do you guys know him? Navy Seal, no Local, oh no, that's my boy.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, he's probably one of my clients. I did his logo, his what's called team institute, Team performance institute?

Speaker 2:

Yeah, will he be intimidated? Yeah, john's awesome. Will he be intimidated by this?

Speaker 3:

Oh, yeah, those guns I was just texting him on my way in here and he would do great. He would be awesome on this because he's just such a genuinely good person and he's successful and he's got that. He just reminded me when you were like talking about the tough guy he's a Navy Seal, but he's just a really cool dude.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, he is, he's really cool, and I remember when he was just starting that whole thing out and I mean he had nothing and now he's doing.

Speaker 2:

I mean he goes to jail.

Speaker 3:

CIOs and motivating yeah.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, just going to all these things, I don't know what he's getting paid now, but I was like 10 grand to have him come out and talk. But he was SEAL team three. Yeah, seal team three, and they're SEAL team six. You remember SEAL team six? Well, he was SEAL team three at that time and he was telling me about all this stuff, and to look at him, you wouldn't think he's this bad ass, dude, but he would literally break your arm in two seconds.

Speaker 2:

I wonder how pissed off he is about the how much publicity those guys were getting from SEAL Cause. I talked to a guy that was Green Beret, yeah, and he did not like the fact that the special force guys were making so much money off of that killing of Ben Laden and all that other show.

Speaker 3:

I wouldn't know I but I do like how he's taken everything he's learned and then turned it into corporate. You know, training corporate teams like me to be motivated when you got to do this for 60 hours a week.

Speaker 2:

Jocko Willock type stuff. Extreme ownership yeah, he totally is yeah.

Speaker 1:

But you got to have that background in order to even be able to be that consultant.

Speaker 3:

You have to. You know what I mean, but you can always flip something.

Speaker 1:

I mean, you spent time doing something, somebody wants to do something. I mean, you know, I'm running for this county commission thing right now. I just had a conversation earlier with a guy. He owns a coffee shop lounge kind of place over on 4th street. Uh, hearth room. I'm shouting out hearth room, a really cool guy and he, he got behind us on this rail thing. You know the whole sale, the rail deal with Cincinnati. We were against that. Anyway, I'm sitting there with him today and you know we're talking about side hustles and things. I'm like man, we really need an entrepreneurship school in Cincinnati. Like we need something that teaches these kids hey, you can go and build software and start a company.

Speaker 2:

NKU has a program for it, then he's one of the high schools I know but it needs to be a partnership to where they're reaching out to the lower, at least the Northern Kentucky high schools. Well, if I'm in Hamlin County I wouldn't be able to do anything.

Speaker 3:

The software part gets. I think. What were you meaning? Where were you going with that?

Speaker 1:

Oh, so so not just the software company, like what we did. But what if you want to buy a baby boomers uh plumbing company?

Speaker 2:

plumbing company, electrical company all that.

Speaker 1:

Well, why isn't there as part of this, entrepreneurship school, uh, a, some kind of technical training or uh, that they could go through and then we could get on like a biz buy, sell. The teachers, right, could get on like a biz buy, sell. Identify a business. Contact this person who's trying to sell. Maybe they don't want to sell it right now. Two years, two years from now, get one of these high school kids to do an apprenticeship for a couple of years. Work with the SBA to get a 7A loan to buy this guy's business off of them because his kids don't want it right. And in most of these kids nowadays you know they all went to school for some, you know white collar type thing, uh. Or to start a nonprofit or something that feels good. We don't plumbers, we don't have electricians. Like, why aren't we doing the schools boring for these kids? It is. And or do a side, some kind of side as well. But the deal here is these are cash flowing businesses. You're not starting from scratch.

Speaker 3:

And I think, a lot of people. I think the biggest detriment is they don't know how to figure out what is worth what. How should they buy it? Is it worth buying? They don't know how to do that analysis, and I think that is a really important piece of it too, just the business side of it, like, is it going to make money, yeah, and can you trust what the people are sending you? Because half the time that's right.

Speaker 2:

Well, I'm not trying to sell you, right. I don't have somebody, I don't have student debt loan, but I've got this business loan is just hanging around my neck. That's just killing me. Because I do, I cannot make the revenue to meet the payments.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, and there has to be a support system there and but I think instead of these kids you know having to go off to four years of college or whatever. I mean, if you're 18 and you can go off and be in the military and you can fight in a foreign war, you can run a business Absolutely and you know if there's a support system. If there's somebody who's smart right and a lawyer attorney, somebody who's used to looking at deals and M&A guy, you have him get on biz by cell, take a look at these things. Or what if the city of Cincinnati or the county created our own platform and said hey look, we got this school, we got potential buyers, we're working with the SBA, maybe the county or the city or somebody's throwing some money in to help the kids out with the down payment or something, and then people start coming to us when they want to sell their business. That's gruesome tonight you can do it in Kentucky. Why not run for something?

Speaker 3:

I love that idea, though I mean, do you think about it? You just. It's almost like you got all these people that want to buy or sell their business. It's like going on and doing. What's the singing show on TV where they get the best singers. Oh, american night, or something you get to see all these great singers and then people are looking at it and saying, hey, that one's the best one. Well, these, all these people want in the cell and you're getting to look at all the business sides of it and then help other people buy it. You already kind of see and help people on it.

Speaker 2:

There's another good yeah, but that website just a little bit to the left of our conversation, osh, is really big. Our friend Osh Patel is he's. He's created a huge commercial real estate investor group and he's this buy sale was. I'd never even heard the website before. I've heard of that one. Yeah, but he basically he said this is where you need to be looking for real estate deals as well, because you look at these business. A lot of these guys were selling the business and the building. So you buy the, you buy the building with the idea that you're going to find the tenant for the business to take over, at least for to run the business. He said they'll, they'll be much more willing to work with you if they know that you can bring a business person, cause a lot of these guys this is like their baby. They want to make sure it's going to the right place. He said but you can get the real estate that way too. It's an entry way to get in a building that you can't get Coverage.

Speaker 1:

I mean my, my LLC. Here is Coverage, but it's really the building right and we run out the downstairs kitchen, we run out this first floor. All these rooms are rented out. People don't even show up Like they just literally rent a room so that they have a closed door in a file cabinet. We got to have a file cabinet right. So two real estate companies that are renting from me. They've been here twice in four years. Yeah, you can run a trucking company out of here.

Speaker 2:

I know that's, that's a big fucking problem. I want to do no, I want to do a virtual, very frustrated Well, I want to do virtual offices here.

Speaker 1:

So I want to do a bunch of those like Osh virtual virtual offices so that people pay you $50 a month. They have their mail sent here. You give them a sweet number, right, so I can have unlimited suite numbers here if I really wanted to. And the businesses here, right, the technically the businesses here. They just get their mail sent here. We organize it, we put in an envelope, we send it off to wherever else they want it sent to, it's their headquarters or whatever. Yeah, this is their headquarters. But people need a physical location. It can't be a PO box right For a lot of things and they don't want it to be their home address Right, they don't want to be their home so you could sell and she was selling those for 49 a month For about like 85 companies. Yeah, but, but, but she served every day.

Speaker 2:

In.

Speaker 1:

Atlanta, his cousin, Asha's cousin. Yeah, she has 150 businesses doing that at $49 a month. Jesus Christ, yeah.

Speaker 3:

That's awesome.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, she's making five with $7,500 a month. That's amazing, just doing nothing. So what Real estate? It's real estate.

Speaker 2:

So what now she's doing? She's just like button these people use. Use her co-working space. We have a second floor right now, that's not least, and I you could break it up into 100 units. How do they find where they listening, like how they finding these tenants?

Speaker 1:

They just put it on a website, like there's tons of like listing sites that you could put on, like broker sites and things like that, and just, or you just advertise it. You say hey, looking for a virtual office, here we go, $50 a month. Have your mail sent. Radio spots.

Speaker 2:

Just for radio spots, the biggest radio media markets. Yeah, do any of that.

Speaker 3:

Get this idea. So I Google ads. I know someone who created this company and I was. I didn't even know he did it until I was talking to someone else who told me he did. And it's you know, when you go to the doctor or you know you go in, you're good in the hospital, let's say, and you're going to visit someone, but the wait is two hours longer than what the time that you were supposed to show up. So it's supposed to be there at noon, but your doctor is not ready to one or two, and they know they're already behind that day. Well, this guy created an app that links into their CRM system, their ER, their Epic systems, and then it can tell you whatever hospital system they're in hey, this, they're two hours behind on appointments today, or one hour. So you can actually just click it and say you're going to be there at that time because they knew they were coming in late. So that saved people hours and hours and hours a day Something you never would think of, right, but it's just they were in the industry for millions and millions and millions. Yeah, that app.

Speaker 1:

You just got to be around that stuff. Like I tell these kids like just keep an eye out for opportunities. People. Just you walk past opportunities every day. You're at your office, you're there every single day, you're, you're angry, you're at the wake up and go to this place. There's some inefficiency in that office with your company that you work for.

Speaker 2:

Look at Ken. I mean it's paying attention, ken at TQL. He was just so sick of being lied to by by freight brokers. He screwed this when he I'm because he was in produce sales. Is he the owner of TQL? Yeah, ok, so he was in, he was in produce sales. He couldn't find anyone reliable so he got sick of it. He's like fuck this, I'm just going to do it myself. And he bought. He got blackballed from the produce wholesale business because they didn't like him leaving because he had all the connections, Probably. I mean, right, well, yeah, and he wasn't going to compete with them in terms of sales, but they were just like you're leaving, you don't leave this company. I'm not going to say what company. You don't leave this company, right, you're this is, this? Is we give you as much training as much like we give you our goodwill Right To increase, to improve your career? You stay here? He's like screw it. And he left and just found you know, there's a niche that it required extremely hard, extreme hard work from all his employees. Right, extreme buy in. He got it. Then it is a guy larger and larger. It required more of a corporate feel to it. He brought in incredibly intelligent people to do that, particularly Carrie Byrne, who's made, who's been then not the main driver, the second main driver behind how awesome the company's become. And yeah, I mean there was a, there was a void in the market and he captured it.

Speaker 3:

It's a perfect timing to was right time.

Speaker 1:

Well, and he yeah, timing is a lot of it. Like people don't get it, but timing is a lot of timing and preparation, timing and preparation and a lot of time. It's like when you don't think it should be. Like when we started our our software business in real estate, it was in 2008, 2009. Yeah, who the hell's doing anything in real estate in 2008, 2009? Everybody's like I'm staying away from real estate, I don't want to go there. Yeah, but you, we built during that time when nobody else wanted to do anything, and then, when the market recovers, here you are with your solution, ready to sell to the market, to remember Fifth Third.

Speaker 3:

Fifth Third Stock was a dollar.

Speaker 1:

Oh, my buddy bought it. It was a buck fifty.

Speaker 3:

When he bought it I was scared to death. I bought some. I wish I would have bought more, yeah.

Speaker 1:

Wow, what a what a one of our co-founders, matt Vorst. He bought. He was buying a bunch of it. I remember sitting there oh, I'm so pissed. This was 2009,. Probably, yeah, I'm sitting there with him in his apartment and he's like I'm going to scoop up some of his Fifth Third Stock at a buck fifty. I'm like, oh, that's cool dude. Like, yeah, I probably, yeah, I probably could have bought some of it too. And then he was like, dude, you heard of this Bitcoin thing. And I'm like, no, it was 50 cents or something crazy like that. Right, and it just launched. And he's like this is kind of interesting. I was like I wonder if we should. And then I'm like, looking back, I'm like I wonder if he did buy some of that for me, because he was.

Speaker 2:

He was saying that is like how the fuck do you hold on to it? Like what, like they're talking like 15 years from now.

Speaker 1:

Yeah.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, like, how do you, how do you hold on to?

Speaker 3:

something that's so high and you don't know when it's going to come down.

Speaker 2:

And I'm not even talking about mentally holding it for the like a price. I'm saying like physically keeping custody of that and not losing it so that you're spending four billion dollars scouring England.

Speaker 1:

It would have been like a zip.

Speaker 2:

You know the guy the guy who's been, who's hired so many people to go through all these landfills in Great Britain, because he's sure as hard drives there with four billion dollars.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, crazy, crazy.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, that is crazy.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, but imagine that if I would have just threw like yeah, Matt, grab me some.

Speaker 2:

You know, I got a hundred bucks on it, you know and you got 200 Bitcoin.

Speaker 1:

That sounds good to me. Yeah, Dot Loop would have looked like a chump change, Like I want to just sold my Bitcoin. You know 40 grand or whatever. I would have sold it out at the time. I probably would have sold it at 10 bucks, though A lot of us.

Speaker 2:

I saw Puerto Rico is yeah it's you told me. Yeah, old San Juan is where a lot of people that were got into cryptocurrency and it's crazy, there's two, there's two fractions. There's the people that got into Bitcoin and Ethereum and all those other cryptocurrencies and they're like fuck the man, fuck the laws, where we don't care and they can't we're not paying taxes here, they can't touch us. And then you have this other group that's down there who also likes to tax incentives, but they're there to build like legitimate businesses, yeah, using blockchain technology, and it's like the jets and sharks, and I will tell you this right now, you feel much more comfortable talking to the people that are looking to build a real business as opposed to something Dude. it was like some of those guys were like zombies. Yeah, the Bitcoin kids that were down there just multimillionaires and all they do is just live the party life. Yeah, they're talking to. Someone was like you guys. Like there is no car, there is no burnout. Well, it's kind of like there is no God. Karma's not real because there's no way somebody like you should be worth $30 million.

Speaker 1:

But it's there, yeah, and you've got to be in that community, I think, in order to to really understand what's going on and to get ahead of it. You know, or to know, that it's going to come up, go up, right. You got to be involved with those like some shiesty people in order to figure out, like is this going to go up, is it going to go down, is it going to do whatever? There is some in every country, every place we went to, like all those conferences we went to, somebody was there to like get your phone number so they could try to sim your phone and steal your crypto. Sick of it, Dude it's just a bunch of scammers Like dude. Why aren't these people like actually trying to build something or do something legitimate yeah? Oh, it's a great the amount of time it takes to do that, to be scammy and weird and you're not going to get a huge payoff a lot of times.

Speaker 2:

And it's set back the adoption of it does, and right Even right now. Senator Warren, she's trying to get it passed. So what is it now that you basically are going to have to say every, you're going to have to know each node because of the, the, the, the, the, the, the, the. They're saying it violates the, the, not antitrust, but something in privacy and banking, or secrecy and banking or whatever act. And she, she's got this whole bill basically wrapped around the idea that the cryptocurrency allows you to money launder Cheese. It's like dude, it is.

Speaker 1:

She doesn't care. It's so much easier.

Speaker 2:

She's a bank person Every, every transaction of Bitcoin, because it's all off of a public key Right. Then it is to trace a serial number of a dollar bill. She's a bank Once that dollar bill goes in circulation. Good luck finding it. Yeah, at least you have a chance they can trace. They trace back all these these hostage situations all the time to the IP address.

Speaker 3:

You know, my, my, my regular job is we sell solutions to try to keep the bad actors that are. You know it might be a nation state like North Korea, or something that attacks on a company and tries to steal their data or completely delete their data. So it's all these phishing attacks. They're everywhere every day, knocking companies out, and it's only going to get worse because the technology is getting smarter and smarter. They're always ahead of the technology in this new generative AI, which is the newest stuff right when it gets smarter on its own. That gets in the wrong hands. It's just, it's a bad thing. So you need good companies. Be it smarter enough and stay ahead of it.

Speaker 2:

I'm sure it's already in the wrong hands. Oh for sure.

Speaker 1:

Oh, it is dude, they got only fans. Fake AI girls, only fans. These guys are making thousands of dollars a month off of these fake girls.

Speaker 2:

It's that all that fake robots and all the robots, the sex bots and all that are coming. It's going to be the greatest eugenics thing of all time for these, for these people to have a hard on for eugenics. Well they're guys. Population growth. I thought this was fake. I thought this was bullshit.

Speaker 3:

So real.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, I thought people would make it where, just like I know there's Gates is kind of as evil and there's a lot of dirty shit about his dad being in eugenics and other stuff. But I didn't believe eugenics had actually reached like the population. I know people people in my circle that feel like there are too many people in this world for there being enough food and that we need to thin the herd like they're fucking Thanos and they're gonna snap their finger. 50% of people are gonna be dead. It's absolutely mind boggling to me.

Speaker 1:

Well, the billionaires they get, so they get. They don't have anything left and they're like, oh, we've already done this thing. I built billion dollar companies on this guy.

Speaker 2:

But if you keep, it now.

Speaker 1:

Now, I'm so smart and I'm gonna, I'm gonna we. As a matter of fact, I was talking about this, the smartest in the world. Yeah, I'm so smart and you don't even worry, we're gonna run this, we're gonna, we're gonna make sure everything's good and I mean they profit from it. Right, we got this happening in city politics, you keep it.

Speaker 2:

If you keep it at the billionaire level, that's fine, because billionaires are fucking weird. Like you watch Michael Jackson and Tom Brady like 100 millionaires, those guys are weirdos. It is a different world. It's when you have your, your search or yeah, your circle, where you're just, you're just a normal person and they're they've already reached those people like that's a problem and you take. So what this AI stuff is going to permit is going to permit a lot of this people dying out, yeah, with, without the bloodletting, because they're not going to want to get married, they're not going to have, they're not already not getting married. Yeah, they'll be plugged in like ready player one and they're going to have this sex bot that they're banging.

Speaker 3:

It's future of warfare is is technology. It's not feet on the street, I don't think bombs knocking out your electric so you don't have electric for a month.

Speaker 2:

I don't think they have to be that trash. I don't think it has to be that drastic. I think what they have to do is what they're doing now and just warm themselves into everybody's daily life. Yep, that's, and get them on the tit of like tick tock, yeah, whatever's, make whatever's making the dope of me and their brain go crazy and so that they crave it. Tick tock, yeah, tick tock. Anything like an endless, the endless loop where you're just like or like you know, the. As soon as meta versus becomes feasible, it's over. Yeah, it's over. There's. There are kids that could that suck. That sports live in that world? Yeah, now, of a sudden, they're. Now of a sudden, they're LeBron James. And what's reality at that point?

Speaker 1:

Who gives a fuck, who gives a?

Speaker 2:

fuck if it doesn't exist here, because he's made himself a multimillionaire billionaire on this and you know, mentally he's living in that world all day long. He's perfectly fine, he's happy. It's wild man.

Speaker 1:

It is so, Doug, what's next for you man? So you're looking for a parking lot. What else you want to do?

Speaker 3:

You know what I want to, that's it's. There's so many different things I'm looking at, but I've been really thinking of Airbnb. Or you know, down in Florida area, maybe trying to get into some Airbnb oh, there's your boy right there, yeah, or what is the other one that I was just looking into? Furnished finder and just looking at trying to get into some homes in different areas and just rent them out.

Speaker 1:

We got to watch it with the single family home. So my about my building? It's in a condo complex, right, they're all Airbnb-able units, but the building itself has a hotel certificate. So that keeps the government from saying, hey, you can't Airbnb this anymore. The city of Dallas outlawed Airbnb's, or something crazy like that. Covington has like, yeah, there's cities out there just outlaw single family because there's not enough houses. Now, right, yeah, that's this problem. So people are looking to the government for a solution.

Speaker 3:

It's definitely turning around, yeah. I mean in a bad way for the people that have Airbnb's.

Speaker 1:

But you go down to Miami. Miami's real estate is still up 7% this year and everybody else is flat or down. Yeah, miami's still going up because you've got literally anyone in South America with money wants to buy Miami In Miami. Everyone in Canada wants to buy Miami, people in Midwest, that's a Houston area, and San Antonio area the ghetto on Vine Street. Everybody's going to Miami dude. But these places have hotel deals and if you buy pre-construction you're buying 20, 30% below market. You're also enjoying the upside every year. So five to 9% gains generally in Miami every year while you're sitting there waiting for it to get built. Then when it pops up, you're up 50%, 40, 50% on this place and then you can rent it out.

Speaker 3:

Normal.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, I mean I could get $250 to $1,000 a day for my place. Yeah, they got people there to manage it for 25%, I'm only concerned with that is. I put a tarot in a parking lot that people can rent.

Speaker 3:

I think this tarot thing is something I want to really explore, because I mean you could start preparing for it right now by yourself, four or five cars, and he has an episode have the whole thing.

Speaker 1:

You know it's a good one. Maserati Ghibli Like you get a Ghibli and they're new, they're 100 and something thousand used they're like 30 something thousand just a couple of years later and so you buy. One of those people thinks it's like a fancy fancy car it's like a mid, like a low to mid.

Speaker 3:

Maserati Right Right Entry level. Used nice car and people will probably pay a mint for it. People don't know the difference between a Ghibli and a Ghibli and they just want to come in, they want to take their girlfriend out or they want to go on a cool date for a night and they're willing to pay it's dollars for it.

Speaker 2:

And it's easy to you just take it to the parking lot, the parking garage, a CVG. You text what spot it's in. Yeah, I did they get the key? They have the code to the key box and they take it back there. The trick is business, people, business people.

Speaker 1:

So if you can get it to the airport, you're going to get more money per day. Yeah, If you just ran out here to some of these people like they're going to treat it like shit and they're going to break it. You want to rent it to business people and you want something nice. Like this is my experience Like there's people that are got like a bunch of crap cars on there and they rent it for 20 bucks a day, 30 bucks a day, 15 year old car. Why do I want to deal with that? Like, why do I want to deal with five people at $20 a day when I can rent it for one person for $200? I agree, so in my car payment might be higher, but guess what? I got a nicer car. That's right. It's going to pay itself off in three, four years. You know I start hitting that as warranty things. I could just give it back. I made $5,000 on it, 10,000. Matter of fact, I made a lot more than that because I haven't had a car payment Right. So I made that plus on top of that I get if I got $5,000 in equity in this car right. So I turn that in, I buy a new one, you know, and then I put that one on to her.

Speaker 3:

So just thinking of going forward, that's pretty much. I mean, it's time, time, it's a non-renewable asset. I probably am going to do one more Laundromat, maybe look for a parking lot, maybe get into some more rentals and just keep stuff that works, yeah, and then just put all my time into my, my real job, right, my normal job, yeah, cause that's for the real money is too so gotta have a both.

Speaker 1:

I love it. You should have a consulting practice. Yeah, start a side hustle consulting Real estate Sounds good. And then people could reach out to you and and you need a website and all that.

Speaker 2:

Larry could actually help you. Set that, uncle Larry could help you, yeah, cause he did consulting and IT forever. That's right.

Speaker 3:

There you go, there you go so life is good, we're having fun and just go get dinner. Yeah, I'll go do dinner. Sounds good, tonya coming no.

Speaker 2:

Joe hasn't replied, do you?

Speaker 1:

want to go.

Speaker 2:

Do you want to go to the hope? We'll have a dinner? Yeah, I'll go, why not? Sounds good. All right guys. Well, I guess we're off to dinner.

Speaker 1:

Well, thanks for listening everybody and, yeah, catch all of our episodes on side hustlemoney. Thanks for joining us on this week's episode of side hustle city. Well, you've heard from our guests. Now let's hear from you. Join our community on Facebook, side hustle city. It's a group where people share ideas, share their inspirational stories and motivate each other to be successful and turn their side hustle into their main hustle. We'll see you there and we'll see you next week on the show. Thank you.

Turning Side Hustles Into Main Hustles
Cultural Divides and Living Thriftily
Real Estate and Laundry Mat Business
(Cont.) Real Estate and Laundry Mat Business
Investing in Funds vs. Single Syndication
Side Hustles and Money-Making Opportunities
Startups, Funding, and Side Hustles
Entrepreneurship School and Business Opportunities
Cryptocurrency, AI, and the Future
Miami Real Estate and Side Hustle