Side Hustle City

Crafting an Affordable Podcast Side Hustle with Radio Industry Veteran Joe Strecker

February 14, 2024 Adam Koehler & Joe Strecker Season 5 Episode 8
Side Hustle City
Crafting an Affordable Podcast Side Hustle with Radio Industry Veteran Joe Strecker
Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

Unlock the secrets to transforming your side hustle into a podcasting sensation with our latest episode featuring Joe Strecker, the broadcasting virtuoso from iHeartMedia. With a career spanning nearly three decades, Joe shares his golden nuggets on the industry's evolution, from analog tapes to the digital revolution, making content creation accessible to everyone. His tales of transition and tips on personal branding are priceless for anyone looking to carve out a niche and influence audiences in the vast podcasting landscape.

This week, we peel back the layers of setting up a podcast studio without draining your wallet. I’ll guide you through the maze of audio equipment choices and lay out the roadmap to soundproofing your space for that crisp, professional sound that can set your podcast apart. Whether you're looking to impress on TikTok or simply seeking to enhance your audio game, our discussion is brimming with actionable insights that will elevate your content creation journey.

Finally, we tap into the art of storytelling and personal branding, drawing inspiration from industry icons and analyzing the colossal impact of podcast figures like Joe Rogan and Tucker Carlson. We wrap up with a practical guide on optimizing your podcast space on a shoestring budget, all while inviting you to join our Side Hustle City Facebook group, where a community of like-minded individuals eagerly awaits to support your podcasting endeavors. Tune in, get inspired, and take your side hustle to the next level with us!

As you're inspired to embark on your side hustle journey after listening to this episode, you might wonder where to start or how to make your vision a reality.  With a team of experienced marketing professionals and a track record of helping clients achieve their dreams, we are ready to assist you in reaching your goals. To find out more, visit www.reversedout.com.

Learn more about Joe's experience and listen to his work here.

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Speaker 2:

Welcome to Side Hustle City and thanks for joining us. Our goal is to help you connect to real people who found success turning their side hustle into a main hustle, and we hope you can too. I'm Adam Kaler. I'm joined by Kyle Stevy, my co-host. Let's get started, all right. Welcome back, everybody to the Side Hustle City podcast. Today we got a special guest, joe Strecker from iHeartMedia. He's actually the executive producer for 55KRC Radio. Joe, welcome to the show.

Speaker 3:

Thanks, I don't know Great to be here.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, You're a pro at this, man. This is like this is.

Speaker 3:

You're usually on the other side of it, Well, yeah, I am, and it being on this side of the microphone is different. So, you know, I'm usually. I'm usually the guy like like yourself right now, which is I'm recording and making sure that it sounds good and then afterwards do a lot of editing and then do it. But yeah, I've been doing this for, let's see, I'm going on my 27th year, Whoa.

Speaker 2:

So yeah, that's a man. It's been since then.

Speaker 3:

Wow, yes, I'm well over 20 years, almost 30 year, and I'm kind of a unicorn because usually in this business you'd be flying around to different places. I've been on with the same station the entire time. I mean, I guess technically I've been with WLT, but when you're with the Hart family you're kind of with everybody. But my main job is with 55KRC for 27 years.

Speaker 2:

Wow, and guys, if you're listening from somewhere else, 55krc is one of our local AM radio stations. That's really popular. It's like 700, and 55KRC Streckers worked with so many, so many different people, so many on air personalities here. Some of them are here and I bet you. A lot of them have gone other places and here you are still, like a cockroach. You can't get rid of him. You can't get rid of him. You can't get rid of me. Hey, well, I don't know if anybody else wants to wake up at 1am, go into the studio, do a whole bunch of stuff and start to show it. What time do you guys start that show?

Speaker 3:

Six, five o'clock, five o'clock, right, we started at five and I get the station about 130. This is every weekday, so yeah, so for three and a half hours, or however many hours that is, I'm working and I put in a full day before a lot of people wake up. So yeah, by the time I'm done at nine, I'm ready for lunch.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, oh, my God, yeah, you're ready for bed. That's wild man. So really tough life being in radio, especially when you got the earliest show, probably, but you've been doing this since the 90s. So if anybody knows about radio, what it takes to be on radio, what it takes to get a podcast up and running, and that's actually what we're going to talk about today I wanted to bring you on because I mean, you're an expert at this, I mean this is I mean, this is I mean. Plus, you've been on one show this whole time, so you've seen the ups and downs. Advertising dollars, what make you know the technology topics the technology is the big thing. The technology.

Speaker 3:

Yes, and when I first started we still had grease, pencils and tape to cut tape with. Yeah, digital is has made everything really easy, and especially recording yourself and doing podcasting and stuff. It's made it so that you can do a talk show out of your house. Actually, you could do a talk show out of your closet.

Speaker 2:

Yeah Well, I think that's why the technology has lowered the barrier to entry for a lot of people, and now you've got folks, especially where you have to brand yourself now, like we live in a digital world now where everybody has some sort of brand, everybody's trying to be an influencer. If you're not trying to be a tick tock influencer, you're probably somebody like me who is a business owner who is trying to brand themselves as whatever. You know me personally, I would kind of be an agency owner, but at the same time, I'm into startups, I'm a little bit into politics and you've got all these different personas. I guess I could, I could claim, and one way I think to build up your persona and to build up more content online is through a podcast.

Speaker 3:

Right and I agree 100% with that. I tell people all the time if you want to increase your brand or increase your influence, then podcasting is one of the big ways to do it.

Speaker 2:

How does that affect people you've seen? Like in the past did they give you feedback like wow man, thanks for having me on the show. You know you really got me out there. Like, what does that do for people?

Speaker 3:

Well, it, first of all, it feeds. It feeds your, your ego first of all, which is which is kind of the part that you know you really want to start doing it. First of all, you're becoming an influencer. You got to feed your ego and it gives you a chance, though, to realize what you actually are doing and sound like behind the mic you have, you're the expert, you have the information, and so, to create a podcast, you're getting your information, your expertise, out there on a platform where, where no one could could usually hear it before you know. If, if you go through the, if you go to my page and you go through my portfolio, I have all the shows that I produce a lot of these people, they're experts in their field and they were trying to figure out hey, how am I going to get this information out there? And that's where podcasting comes in. And podcasting is people think it's, it's it's you have to do a 30 minute show or 45 minute pro show and you, you're doing a talk show. You can do a five to 10 minute podcast. I tell a lot, of, a lot of clients who are, who are in businesses, like a realtor or a lawyer or something, hit one topic, go five to 10 minutes, and you're the expert People are are are consuming information in all kinds of different ways and when, when you do a, you know a short five, 10, you're. You're hitting one topic and you're leaving people right wanting more. And you know, you, you're the like I said, you're the expert. People are coming to you for their expertise.

Speaker 2:

And would it be better to do like a weekly hour show or would it be better every day to do a little five to 10 minute thing, maybe put something up on social media like an Instagram reel, a TikTok reel, one of those things, and do those every single day versus a weekly hour long show.

Speaker 3:

I guess it depends on how much time you want to put into it. Um, doing a 45, 30 to 45 minute show, uh, I tell people that it takes. You take that, you multiply it by two and that's how long you're editing. Time is, you know, 30 to 45 minutes. You know you're going to be in the, you're going to be in your editing software for a good you know hour and a half, two hours if you're, if you're cleaning everything up, and that's kind of where I come in.

Speaker 2:

Well, and also, you don't have to clean up as much if you've got good stuff, if you've got the right kind of setup, you've got the right kind of equipment, and there's so much stuff out there. When I was doing research, you know, I found this whole roadcaster setup and that's what I use here. But some people you know they're doing, you know, podcasts from maybe Disneyland or they're doing it from wherever you know, offsite, not necessarily at their studio, at their home or their office or whatever. What would you suggest to people? Somebody comes to you and says, joe, you know I want to be an influencer. Yeah, what? What would you tell them?

Speaker 3:

That would say Are you good? Are you good in front of a microphone? That's the first. Main thing is sound. If you sound like you, like I said, you sound like you know what you're talking about, then people are going to listen to you. That's the first thing. Second thing is is equipment. If you get, you know, if you go on the Internet, there's tons of stuff but you're going to have to pay for the good stuff. If, if you want a twenty dollar microphone, then you're just you're going to sound like a twenty dollar microphone. So my advice is, you know, invest in the good equipment, the good name, brand equipment. And thirdly, find a good spot. That's good soundproof, that's good, you know. Good soundproofing, quiet room, with no distractions. The big thing is, if you have, say, you're in a room with ducks, ducks either turn off your air conditioning on your recording or close the duct while you're recording. A lot, of, a lot of times I've recorded people and you hear that they're conditioning in the background, yeah. So so, yeah, know what you're talking about. Equipment, soundproofing. If you can clear all that then you can have a decent, decent sounding show.

Speaker 2:

Well, even some of these co-working spaces, like we have our and you can probably see it here we have our co-working space. Here I had a window, or I have a room with no windows in it and I'm like, well, nobody's ever going to rent this. People want windows in their office, right? So what can we do with this little 10 by 10 room? Well, turn into a podcast space. And then, yeah, I like I literally just started the podcast just because I was built out of podcast room here and I'm like, well, somebody's got to use it. Let me, let me, let me get going and let me start a podcast doing something about side hustles, right, so yeah, but this is a legitimate side hustle. I mean, a lot of people listen to this. A lot of people give me feedback. I get to have friends of mine like you on here who who can come on, talk about things you know, give people some different perspectives. I mean you've got a almost 30 year career in radio. People. People are getting advice from people that don't know what they're talking about, half the time online. Absolutely, it's crazy, right, and it's like, just go to someone who actually has experience and knows what they're talking about. And if you're here in Cincinnati, like I mean, you even go out to people's houses and you literally will will look for a space, help them decide what kind of padding stuff they need to get on the wall, what kind of setup they need. I mean it's crazy, like you're, you're doing that as a side hustle.

Speaker 3:

Right, right, yeah, I, I've been. I've consulted on on many a room to to build a new room for for podcasting, even even a radio studio I've consulted on. So so, yeah, I've been doing this for for a long time and you know, if you want, if you want a good room, then you know you got to put the money into it. That's, that's the bottom line that I would tell people. If you want it good, you got to spend the money.

Speaker 2:

Well, first of all, I don't know anybody else that goes out and spends a time to install a room for someone, like actually design and build out a podcast studio for somebody. But if somebody's interested in something like that, what, what would you say? The price range would be Like low end kind of, just get you going up to. Hey, I want this thing to be nice.

Speaker 3:

You're going to spend? You're going to spend about 100 bucks on a good microphone, like the microphone that I. In your setup Looks like it's a road Mm. Hmm, yeah, yeah, 100 bucks for a good microphone. As far as the mixer goes, you know we're road fans and they run about four to five, six hundred dollars each. See, your soundproofing depends on how big your room is. You're going to spend a couple hundred bucks on soundproofing. Get decent headphones. I mean, the ones I have are 50 bucks. So all in all, you're going to spend a couple, three grand or for a decent setup.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, yeah, but you want to do it right. I mean there's so much equipment out there that claims to be like podcast, studio equipment, like all in one thing. I mean you could spend days doing research on this stuff and then get like buyer's remorse when it comes or just get stuck in, I don't know. I don't know what that phase is called, where you just there's too many options and you just don't end up doing anything.

Speaker 3:

Right, right, and you know, and then you're even if you buy inferior equipment, then you're stuck with that inferior equipment, and that's that's not good either, that's not at all. And then you're, and then you're calling me saying I can't get this, this microphone, to work with my laptop or with my computer or whatever. And I'm like well, you bought a crappy microphone.

Speaker 2:

It's not going to work. What do you want me to do about that? Yeah, I mean, this is what it is.

Speaker 3:

You get me a budget back in the box, send it back and spend. You know, don't put. Don't put your microphone budget on $20. Put your microphone budget on a couple hundred dollars.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, yeah. And now what is? Do you help them with video to, because it seems like a lot of people want to do like tick, tock stuff and everything or do you just recommend people use their phone for the video and then somehow like tap into like their road equipment and everything so they're not using their phone microphone?

Speaker 3:

You. Yes, you definitely have to connect it to your phone or whatever microphone you're using, because phone microphones do not have the best quality and it sounds like you're on a phone microphone and you know you can get a decent. And now here I'm saying that I'll spend $20, but there is a really cool little tool, little microphone that's about. It's about 30 bucks, but what it is is it connects to your phone and it gives you studio quality audio into your video. Oh, wow, and yeah, it's really cool. I'll send you the link so you can share it. Oh, I'll put that out there. Yeah, it's really really it's really, really nice and a lot of people are using it A lot. I've seen a lot of sideline reporters use it. You know I do work for more high school and their sideline reporter uses this little microphone and it's tapped right into her phone and it's studio quality and she does her interviews and then emails them to me for editing right from her phone.

Speaker 2:

And now does that? Do you have to open up like? What do you open up to record Generally? Is there, is there like an app or something you recommend, or is it just like the regular voice recorder on?

Speaker 3:

the regular voice record that you can have on like an iPhone that you use to like if you're voicing notes, that it works with that, or or if you can find some decent digital software for your phone on an app or something. But I use your voice text, yeah, or your voice memo program with it.

Speaker 2:

Well explain the different types of microphones. So like mine here is you know, if I stand a foot behind this thing, you don't hear anything. It's just you got to be up on it in order to gain thing, which is also helps, kind of, if you got a duckwork problem right, Like what you were explaining. If there's like some duckwork and you're going to hear something, come on, you may not want like a was it like an omni mic that kind of picks up everything. You may want more of a directional mic. Is that how that works?

Speaker 3:

Yeah, you definitely want a directional mic if you're going to do podcasting in the studio. If you have an omni omni directional mic, it's going to pick up everything. Also, I would recommend a decent mic screen. But yeah, you definitely definitely directional. Directional mics, Omni directional. Some of the new mics now have an option where you can actually flip a switch and change it from omni directional to directional.

Speaker 2:

Oh, I didn't know that.

Speaker 3:

And what's the?

Speaker 2:

screen thing for, like I know, it's like what is it like?

Speaker 3:

a pop in it's for a pop and peas or or you know no, pop and peas, pop and deez. It kind of gives you a little compression on your voice as well. So that way you don't sound like you're talking directly to a mic and that way you don't have to use your compression function on your software that you're using.

Speaker 2:

I see, Okay, what is so? Do you also help them with video, Like when you go in and install like a studio and they say, hey look, I want to do audio, but I also want to do video. I want to live stream, I want to because there's so much stuff you could do, even though you know ours is mostly audio. Like this is you know, really what we do is audio, podcast, I mean. But we could do video if we had the right kind of software. I mean I do most of these on zoom, but zoom just 640 by 480, I think, is the max that you can record on zoom. So I mean I would really need something like a stream yard or something like that to do these on Like. Do you help people with all of that as well?

Speaker 3:

Yeah, I can help set that up Now. As far as, as far as editing and doing a video editing, if I would do that I would need 36 hours in the day.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, so like you're showing them how to use it.

Speaker 3:

Right, yeah, yeah, yeah, exactly.

Speaker 2:

Okay, cause I even got. I mean, I've got one of these little. What I found out is I went out and I bought one of these little Insta 360, like web cams, right, but they're 4k, so they're really, really good cameras and they're on a gimbal and everything and I can use hand gestures and move the camera around. But the problem is, is there USB-C? And my switcher, my video switcher? I got an 810 mini pro. Black magic you. It's all HDMI, so you need a converter that will convert USB-C into HDMI, and then the audio doesn't match up with the video.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, and then every, every time you, you, you have a wire connected or have a different connection, you lose a generation. So right now, you're losing a generation on your, on your camera, to what you have now. Cause, you're cause, you're connecting one cord to another, to another, so you're ready down to two generations. That's another. That's another thing you need to work. Think about, when you're putting together a studio, the least amount of cords the better. I mean, you can have all these connectors, you can have all these these cords and connectors and you can do it all around this. But every time you connect something, you're going to lose a generation and it's going to sound like you know you, it's not going to sound the way you want it to.

Speaker 2:

When it drives me crazy, joe, because these computers, like these Apple computers, they, they keep trying to get rid of all their ports. It's like every single year, it's like there's only one port now. Like, oh, here you go, you just get, you know, one or two of these USB-C ports. Oh, last year it was a lightning port, now it's a US. Like they keep changing the connections, they keep changing the ports and it's just like things just keep getting upgraded and upgraded. So it probably makes sense to work with somebody who knows what to do and how to put this stuff together so you don't get yourself in trouble like I did.

Speaker 3:

Absolutely 100%.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, so what's your, what's your company, what's your website?

Speaker 3:

Joe Strecker Productions is is what it's called. I have a, a Spreaker page. That's kind of like my online resume. I every single show that I have ever produced is on there, even though I might not produce them anymore, but I keep them on there live and available, so people can see the different variety of stuff that I produce. I also have a Facebook page it's Joe Strecker Productions. I'm trying I'm really really trying to to make TikToks, but I'm not that good at video yet, but so Well as long as the audio sounds good.

Speaker 2:

I think you're a good shape, like you know. You get the audio going, you got a decent video camera, but then it's all about getting on like CapCut or InShot or one of these other apps to actually edit the video and everything on the phone. And they do have some stuff, but then they kind of you know, kind of the corning after a while or you know, there's only so many tools that you have access to or so many effects that you can use, and some of them are just weird. Some of them are like stuff you'd never, ever, in a million years. If you have any kind of eye for design that you would ever use, you would look like a 15 year old girl trying to edit video If you use some of these things. It would just be, it would be bad.

Speaker 3:

Right yeah, and the least amount of the least amount of stuff, because if you overproduce it where you have so many filters on it, people are going to notice that they're going to be. You know, this doesn't look good. So my suggestion for video editing is try to keep as many filters off as possible?

Speaker 2:

Yeah, I would agree with that too. Well, what works, joe? Like I mean, you've been in radio for a long time. You mentioned having a good voice, you mentioned, but you're on a big platform. I mean 55K RC is a big platform, 700 is a big platform. I mean we're. You know, cincinnati is like the center of radio for years and years and years, with the voice of America and all that. What would you say, out of all the people you've come across in the last 30 years, what would you say the really successful ones are good at?

Speaker 3:

Wow, they're good at bringing the audience in there. There, I mean, brian's dad, jerry, was the master at that. Yes, he could. He could bring you into a story. And that's just through doing it, because he did it for 50 years easily and just him bringing, bringing people into and bringing the emotion into whatever you're talking about, I mean, if you're passionate about it, even if you're talking about, you know, washing your car, if you're passionate about the way you wash your car, people are going to be like, wow, that's incredible. And then you draw them in. It's, it's, it's all about drawing people in and that's how you're going to be a success. That's how you're going to get a successful podcast. Yeah.

Speaker 2:

And this is not just. It's not just with podcasting, it's with anything branding. I mean, I've been in marketing my whole life and it's like every brand has to have a story. You have a persona, you have a target group that you're trying to go after and you say what does this target group care about?

Speaker 3:

And then make it personal make it personal.

Speaker 2:

What are their expectations for for your video? What's? What do they want out of life? What do they want out of listening to this? Are you improving them in some way? So you know, I think at all, and you could probably talk to this. It probably all starts at who is your customer.

Speaker 3:

Really Right. Who's your target audience and what do you want to get out of what you're doing? I mean, if you just got there to give out information, do you want to sell something? You know that is what when you're doing a show. That's what kind of what you have to, kind of, you know, carve your show or outline your show and and into. Yeah. So I would so make make. But making it personal is really the big thing. You want to feed on people's emotions.

Speaker 2:

When? Who is this right for? So I mean you. You find your audience, you get what their emotions are. Maybe they're even you, right? I mean you're like, hey look, I'd be interested in this. I'm going to do a podcast. I would assume a lot of people start. I mean I started the side hustle podcast because I like doing side hustles and I want to tell people hey, there's ways for you to make money out here outside of your nine to five like it. There's no sense in anyone who lives in America being poor. It just doesn't make any sense. There's too much out here to be making excuses and not doing anything. It's ambition, right, and I want to, if you're ambitious at all. That's why I wanted to do my show. Hey look, if you want to do this, try this. I'll try it out and I'll tell you if it works or not. You know, on my show. So I mean I like doing stuff like that and and I think there's other people out there who would be interested in that so that's what I built my show around. But who is this right for? Like, what does this do for a person? We talked a little bit earlier about helping to build your personal brand. What would you say about that? Like, what is this? Who does this help? Who's the right type of person to start a podcast?

Speaker 3:

Someone who is ambitious, like you said, someone who who really has the knowledge and know how to get something out there that people really, really care about. You know it's all about. You know and you have to be genuine. You can't people can spot a fake. A fake or a mile away. So you know you're building your personal brand is is. You know, you want to, you want to do your best to be that person. You want to be the person that makes people you know, when they listen, when they listen to you, there's an actual feeling and you know and they care.

Speaker 2:

Yeah.

Speaker 3:

And if you know yeah, what would you?

Speaker 2:

what would you say if? If I wanted to say, hey, joe, can you give me a list of several people, or several channels, or people on the radio, maybe even nationally, like Howard Stern or somebody like that in your experience? If I wanted to to be better, right, and I wanted to do exactly what you said who do I listen to? Who do who style do I listen to, even if it's a variety of different people, because, you know, if I'm starting a podcast, I may not, I may not be the Howard Stern type, right, I may want to be like somebody else. Who would you say is a good person? Or people, different folks to listen to.

Speaker 3:

OK, now, I'm going to preface this by saying you might not agree if they're politics, but you're just listening for their, their style and the way they do it. But you know we don't have any old tapes of Jerry Thomas anywhere. Sadly All that stuff got lost in the move. But he was definitely the master, regardless of politics. If Russian limbaugh was the master at bringing you in, he could take a a three line article and go an hour and a half with it and he would. He would draw you in and let you and you'd have emotion about it. It would be a three line news article. That's like a side that you thought was a throwaway. He was. He was the master at doing that. Howard Stern is really good at at doing that as well. He could draw you in with whatever he's talking about and make you have feeling about it. So emulating yourself after those big at least those two I was trying to go opposite ends of the spectrum there. Oh, yeah. It's if you just listen to their style and listen to the way they can that they can draw you in on on really absolutely nothing. I mean talking about. You know what way to hang your paper, your toilet paper, in your bathroom.

Speaker 2:

There was a lot of people concerned about that.

Speaker 3:

There was. There was a guy he he passed away a couple years ago and he was Bob Connors and he used to be on WTVN in Columbus and he was challenged one day by somebody I don't know if it was a program director or what, or what not to to do a show on the most inane thing. So he thought of having a debate on what way to flip your toilet paper. Yes, the phones were packed for three hours.

Speaker 2:

Unbelievable.

Speaker 3:

All people commenting on and he made it sound like and what he did was he took. He took the the underneath side and people are calling and calling him crazy for three hours Talking about how to flip the roll of toilet paper. He won the bet and he was really just trolling.

Speaker 2:

He wasn't even like serious about any of this. He was just trolling to see what people do.

Speaker 3:

And I think the bet was kind of like trading spaces. I think he got a dollar, wow, yeah of course.

Speaker 2:

Well, what would? What would you say like to a guy like Rogan? I mean, rogan's got a ridiculous podcast. Obviously he had a following before he started his podcast, but he wasn't any any different than any other celebrity out there. I wouldn't say, you know, anybody really thought of Joe Rogan Like no, you say Joe Rogan. Most people were like, oh yeah, I think I know you're talking about the guy from Fairfactor, right, oh yeah, the comedian. Yeah, ok, the guy that does MMA.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, the MMA guy Right.

Speaker 2:

Like everybody thought of that, but he skits his podcast and it blows up. What is it about Joe Rogan? You think that? And he was pretty liberal for a while there and he kind of started moving right a little bit. Now he's I'd say he's more. He's still moderate. Yeah, he's in the middle right and you know, people hate him on the far edges of both sides because, you know, some people say he's too liberal, some people say he's too conservative. But that's, you're going to get that. But it's not really about that. It's about there's something about him that just draws people in. Maybe it's a topic, it's a guess, it's the, I don't know. What do you, what do you surmise from it's?

Speaker 3:

it's, it's really the way Joe Rogan presents it. He, he takes the topic, he has a stance and he develops a good five or six takes around that topic and every single one of those takes is going to draw in and give you some sort of reaction, and that's, that's. That's the one thing about Joe Rogan that has really, really made him popular. It's he can, he can do that and, and since he's in, since he's in on the podcast platform, he can get animated and he can do a couple of nice words that we can't do here on the on the regular radio. Right, and I've, I've, I've always told some, you know people, that sometimes when those flip out for effect, it starts, that's what really gets, you know, starts people, emotion gets to their emotion Hopping up. That's why people are, when you hear words like that it's, it's like a little like a marker in your head like, oh, did you just say that? And then it draws you in even more. I'm not going to say you want to do a complete like Andrew Dice, clay Custvest, but if you're doing a show and one flips out, you know, remember you're on a podcast platform, you know you're not going to get in trouble.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, yeah. Well, he was even uncancelable when people were still getting canceled. At one point they couldn't even cancel him because they just signed him to that big contract. They weren't going to get rid of him or tell him what to do. I mean right, they, they, they essentially bought his show or licensed his show or whatever they did because of the way he presents things.

Speaker 3:

He represents it. You know he's he's very good at taking a topic and making, like I said, six or seven takes, and he might not even use them all. He might use three or four and then save the other couple. For you know he he'll start off strong with this, with a strong first point, and then he'll do is these two like sub points? And then he'll knock you in the head with with our really big final point, and that's what's going to, that's what's going to draw people in, that's the people who are going to be emotional about that. And then you're going to they're going to be one more and then they're going to be like wow, I can't wait till next week or tomorrow or or whenever your next podcast drops.

Speaker 2:

Right, Right and they love it. And he's a. You know, he has a cult following and it's just tons of people. And the same with guys like Tucker. You know, I know a lot of people don't like Tucker. He's a, you know, a controversial person. But, man, he got more views on that Putin interview. Yeah, that was awesome Then the Super Bowl.

Speaker 3:

I don't know Whoever his book or his needs to definitely get a raise for it, get in Vladimir. But I know, gosh, goodness, yeah, and it was a great interview and I think they dipped in the things that you couldn't do on regular radio. They they dipped into some really, especially the part about why he was ticked off at Ukraine. He's like I had nothing to do for what was going on. He said this has been going on since 2014.

Speaker 2:

I was there. I was in Ukraine in 2017. And they were fighting these rebels were fighting in the Donbass region or whatever and they were in, you know, the center of Kiev, where my hotel was asking for money for munitions, for clothing, for food and all the stuff for the troops in the East. I mean, I was there. I was you know. I remember them fighting that war back then. I mean they, you know the Russians had made it all the way to Kiev or anything like they did, where they invaded from what was that? Belarus up there, and they were trying to come in. But I mean that war has been going on for a while now. It's you know that war, obviously the Israeli conflict, you know, with the Palestinians. That's been going on for thousands of years and people are talking about it like it's a new thing. It's wild to me, but you know you get a guy like Putin or somebody and it's you know you're going to draw a crowd.

Speaker 3:

And people speculate, saying, well, this is something that happened recently and a lot of these issues have been going on, like you said, for for hundreds of years. You know when, when Putin said, yeah, we've been. We've been ticked off at them since 2014,. When they didn't sign on those it was a treaty or they didn't follow some sort of treaty and it was like, oh my gosh, here we are, you know, eight, eight, nine years later, and we're finally realizing it.

Speaker 2:

But it was a timely interview to yeah. So it's the timing of the things that you do, like. What topic do you want to cover? Right? Well, if you have, your podcast covers a topic. You know an overall, you know industry or whatever. What do you want to call it? Real estate, right? Just say real estate. Well, now, interest rates are a big deal, right? So you do a show on interest rates. Maybe you bring in somebody from the government who understands the interest rates, or a finance person who understands the real you know, so that people can get an expert opinion on what's going on right now with interest rates and what the future looks like. So you know, a lot of times it's timing and even with these Tucker interviews and the Rogan interviews outside of that, those things end up turning into memes and then they live on outside of the interview. So you've got, you know, the interview you can go listen to. But then you've got memes all over Twitter right now with Putin and Tucker, and it's like people will pick up on that stuff and make you even more famous.

Speaker 3:

Right, absolutely. I mean that's, that's the way to do it. That's the way to do it. You got to do it and be timely, know what you're talking about, be passionate. I mean that's, that's, that's those magic sauce there.

Speaker 2:

But at the end of the day you need an expert to come in help you out, figure out the right kind of important.

Speaker 3:

You can have the best sounding podcast ever, the greatest voice, the. You know the best topics, but if you sound like you're in the middle of a bathroom if you sound like you're, you know if you got tech problems people aren't going to listen. People, people will last about a you know a good 15, 20 seconds. If you don't grab them in the 15, 20 seconds, they're moving on.

Speaker 2:

Yep, yep. People's attention spans are very short nowadays, yes, and they keep getting shorter. So but Joe, again, explain, let us know, let the audience know where they can find you and how they can, how they can contact you, and it you know, do you go outside of Cincinnati, the Cincinnati area and help people, people?

Speaker 3:

my, my, my website is it's a. It's a spreeker page. You have to go to spreeker and search for Joe Strucker productions. I have a Facebook page, joe Strucker productions as well. S T R E C K E R Duke likes to change my last name all the time for some reason. And, yeah, I, I, I consult on putting home studios together. I consult on podcasting, on the podcasting, on the podcasting, on the podcasting. I, I do the whole gamut and it all depends. I will travel to Dayton and maybe to South, you know, like maybe Lexington, but you know if it, if it's out of that area, you know I could do that, I could do. I could consult via, via Zoom or via remotely. Yeah, people can send you an email. I can send you a message. You know if you're in the city, you know you can send me a message. You know you can send me a message, zoom or via remotely.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, people can send you an email. They can say, hey look, I got this space. You could tell them what to do. Hey, go measure your space, let me know what you want to do and then what's your budget, and then you can kind of check around the internet and give them some suggestions on what they put in there.

Speaker 3:

Absolutely.

Speaker 2:

Awesome, joe. Well, man, thanks for being on the podcast and all those links and everything we're going to put down in the description. So, if you guys want to want to find Joe, and if you didn't know, strucker is almost like Strucker, so yeah, yeah, yeah, people might get confused, so we'll have to put the links down in the description. Cool, thanks, I don't appreciate it. Yeah, joe, thanks for coming on. Thanks for joining us on this week's episode of Side Hustle City. Well, you've heard from our guests. Now let's hear from you. Join our community on Facebook. Side Hustle City. It's a group where people share ideas, share their inspirational stories and motivate each other to be successful and turn their side hustle into their main hustle. We'll see you there and we'll see you next week on the show. Thank, you.

Turning Side Hustles Into Podcasting Success
Setting Up a Podcast Studio Tips
(Cont.) Setting Up a Podcast Studio Tips
(Cont.) Setting Up a Podcast Studio Tips
Podcasting and Personal Branding Perspectives
Popularity of Joe Rogan and Tucker
Space and Budget Optimization in Podcast