Side Hustle City

Thriving in Business with Brooke Bailey's Action Plans and Wellness Tips

February 16, 2024 Adam Koehler with Brooke Bailey Season 5 Episode 9
Side Hustle City
Thriving in Business with Brooke Bailey's Action Plans and Wellness Tips
Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

Embark on a transformative journey with Brooke Bailey, a dynamic business and wellness coach who's here to guide you through the intricate dance of entrepreneurship and personal well-being. With roots in Atlanta and Kentucky, Brooke brings a unique perspective on how to juggle the demands of business with the necessities of a fulfilling life. She doesn't just talk the talk; she walks us through real strategies for managing people, mastering difficult conversations, and ensuring your business has the HR support it needs as it scales. There's no magic wand here, just the hard-earned wisdom of someone who knows what it's like to stand at the helm of a growing enterprise.

As women in business, we're often pulled in multiple directions, tasked with being everything to everyone. That's where Brooke's approach, blending yoga and wellness with sharp business acumen, becomes a lifeline. It's not about piling more onto your plate; it's about harnessing the power of habit hacking and crafting 90-day action plans that play to your strengths. These personalized blueprints are not just about surviving the business world; they're about thriving in it, with your sanity intact and your goals within reach.

We wrap up with a candid discussion on the disparities in entrepreneurial support across genders. We compare the motivational content targeted at men and women, before diving into a talk about the cultural and social constructs that shape our interactions. This episode isn't just theory; it's a rallying cry for support systems that grasp the unique challenges faced by female entrepreneurs. We underscore the importance of mentorship and community, exemplified by our vibrant Side Hustle City Facebook group, where dreams of turning side hustles into full-time careers are nurtured. So, grab a seat at our table, and let's navigate this journey together.

As you're inspired to embark on your side hustle journey after listening to this episode, you might wonder where to start or how to make your vision a reality.  With a team of experienced marketing professionals and a track record of helping clients achieve their dreams, we are ready to assist you in reaching your goals. To find out more, visit www.reversedout.com.

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Speaker 1:

Welcome to Side Hustle City and thanks for joining us. Our goal is to help you connect to real people who found success turning their side hustle into a main hustle, and we hope you can too. I'm Adam Kaler. I'm joined by Kyle Stevie, my co-host. Let's get started, all right? Welcome back everybody to the Side Hustle City podcast. Today we have a special guest coming all the way from Atlanta but has Kentucky roots Brooke Bailey. Welcome to the show.

Speaker 2:

Thanks so much, adam. I'm excited to be here and have a chat with you today.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, yeah, and so you're a business slash wellness coach. So it's kind of like being entrepreneur, but don't run yourself ragged.

Speaker 2:

Exactly, yeah, the idea is sustainable entrepreneurship, if you can envision that. I know that's a challenging perspective, kind of what we generally think of as really exhausting all of your resources and putting 110% into your business, and I try to help women business owners create a sense of meaning and balance between their personal lives and their professional lives, while maintaining their health and hopefully not burning out so that they can keep making a positive impact and keep doing what they love.

Speaker 1:

Well, when I read your website, it reminded me of my wife, who owns a spa and she does facials all day. She used to do eyebrows and nails and all that, but the margins aren't as good and she could just have clients in there all day doing facials anyway, so she didn't need to be doing all that other stuff, so they were just taking up her time and it didn't really pay the bills. So she started just doing facials all day and then she expanded her space, she got more room, she got another room, two rooms. I think she's had a lot of issues with people. I think that's probably her number one problem. It isn't running her business. It isn't using QuickBooks, paying the bills, updating her website, writing her blog. She figured that stuff out. What she had the most stress with, I would say, is people. Is that something that you find a lot with entrepreneurs?

Speaker 2:

Yeah, absolutely, and especially with female entrepreneurs. A lot of times there's that challenging point of wanting to be perceived as nice or kind and kind, of not really knowing how to effectively have those difficult conversations and move the relationship forward, or in the relationship in a lot of cases. As you're saying employees or subcontractors not showing up or not completing the work and that's definitely something we talk about on our group coaching calls quite a bit Just taking that next small step forward and what is the aspect of the next part of the conversation that you need to have with this person and how do you need to do that? So for sure, that's something that comes up a lot and it's kind of nice to have a group setting in that space because you get to hear feedback from other people and what they've gone through and how they've handled different situations. And I think that is a lot of the issue. When we go into starting our own business, it's because we have a specific skill set or a specific interest generally in an area, unless maybe we're taking over a family business or whatnot. But we go in with a lot of knowledge about that particular product or service and not necessarily the complementary knowledge about managing the business or managing the people. And you're saying your wife was pretty good on managing the business aspect. It's the people, the personnel, the logistics of getting those services and that customer care the way that she wants it. I learned a lot about herself and learned a lot about what she wants in terms of the hiring process and how to screen, hopefully to prevent that from happening in the future.

Speaker 1:

Yes, she had to put all kinds of policies together and everything. What drives me crazy is so, and you probably get this too but some of these customers not for me necessarily I do web design, graphic design, technology stuff but with her customers or her employees, it's almost like they expect her to have the same structure as a big business, would like a venture-backed business, and you just don't right. You're a solopreneur and you're like, hey, I want to grow here, I'll hire another person. The next thing, you know, you've got to have all these policies and procedures and all this legal stuff in place, because these people come in and then maybe they're a bad employee or maybe they are nefarious for some reason and they're looking for some kind of loophole to get you in trouble so that they can get paid. I mean, it gets scary when you start hiring employees and you don't have that stuff in place. But when you're a small business, you don't really think about that stuff. You just were doing everything yourself and you're like you know what, maybe it's time for me to grow, maybe I bring one person on and that you really got a hire smart.

Speaker 2:

You do. You have to hire smart and be lucky. And then I think there's a threshold where you bring in some HR support to fill those services and there are a lot of outsourced groups where you can get the documentation and you can find out what the threshold is for your particular service or business in terms of what you will actually need for paperwork and covering all of that. But yeah, that's a big consideration and you want to kind of run the numbers, hopefully in advance of making that decision, because there is a point where it no longer is profitable. You bring the people in and that's consuming all of the additional profits that you were expecting to collect for yourself and that's now going to employment and overhead concerns.

Speaker 1:

When they don't know that. They think that you're because you own a business, you're this multimillionaire or something, and what they don't know is that you're not taking a paycheck, like you're brought them on, you're essentially paying them what you used to get paid and you're hoping that you can work on the business, bring in more people and grow the business from there. But in the meantime you're in this weird space and they don't think it because you're their employer they're not thinking about, they don't care that you're not making any money, right. And then they want more and they want more. And it's just like at some point you gotta let them know like oh guys, I'm just like a small business here, like there's only so much I could do for you. And to your point, and I guess what I was bringing up is, you can't just be a small business owner and understand what you're selling. You also have to understand HR. You gotta kind of be a lawyer sometimes. You've gotta kind of understand some of the ways these things go and you might just want to hire an outsource HR company to take care of some of that stuff if you don't want to have to deal with it.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, a lot of times. And again there's the economic side of it and then there's the personal time commitment side and sometimes you feel like you don't have the economic resources to hire out with that. But once you realize how time consuming it's gonna be, then a lot of times it's like there's no way not to pay for it, because you really are learning a whole new skill set, a whole new set of laws and paperwork and bureaucracy that you have to go through.

Speaker 1:

So yeah, Well, now that I've scared people away from wanting to be entrepreneurs, I know I was gonna say this is not an upward trending conversation on A no, no no no Go out there and start your own service-based business. Well, now that we've scared them, right now, what you you knowing this right, I mean this is part of what you have to deal with all day. This is something that you, that people probably come to you with these issues, and even more than what we just talked about. This is why you exist, because you're here to tell these folks hey, look, it's be an entrepreneur, but understand, things are gonna come up and you're going to need some balance in your life. You're gonna need to feel like this is a good decision so that you don't go running back to that nine to five world.

Speaker 2:

Yes, and I think that some it is. Especially when you initially start a business, you are very much consumed by it and it does a lot of times take over your personal life and leave little room for relationships and health, and you just have to be very conscientious and self-aware of where you can carve in that space for yourself, physically and mentally. And so a lot of times we do talk about little tricks of the trade, and you mentioned boundaries and effectively being able to communicate those boundaries and recognizing that it's not a one-time conversation with an employee. It's not a one-time conversation with a partner or spouse. It's not a one-time conversation with yourself or with your children. It's got to be an ongoing, repetitive conversation that keeps becoming refined over time for where you are and what you need in that particular relationship.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, and what made you wanna go in this direction? I mean, this is your entrepreneurial path that you've taken, but what did you see out there, what did you hear from people that made you want to be kind of a entrepreneurial life coach?

Speaker 2:

Well, I see my background is in business and international business. I worked in a family business and I burnt myself out and I realized that there had to be a different way to have your own business, to be entrepreneurial and not kill yourself, basically, from just being exhausted and miserable. I felt very much not myself when I was in that kind of place of burnout, doing things, you know, just feeling like it wasn't me. And so when I got out of that situation, part of what I the tools and strategies I had used to try to reduce my stress level came through exercise and, in particular, yoga. At the time I didn't know much about yoga other than that I was stretching. I started to go to yoga classes and as I was going through this process of exercise that included synchronizing your breath with your movement, I just started to see things a little bit differently and I got curious about why. I was curious why I was seeing things differently from that form of exercise versus jumping on a treadmill or a stationary bike, and that led me to study yoga. I became a certified yoga teacher while I was still in this family business and then, when I left the family business, I thought because I had had a lot of experience traveling and living overseas a bit of the perspective on more of an eastern approach to wellness, and so I got really curious and continue to study yoga and it's sister science, which is called I, your Beta, and I became a wellness coach. So it really went down the path of kind of me managing my stress from burnout and then just being really curious about this philosophy and approach to health and wellness, and then eventually I brought the two sides of my background together, kind of merging east and west, if you will my business background and my wellness background, and I realized that in particular, women entrepreneurs are faced with certain challenges that I felt like I could support and in general people go to a business coach or they go to a trainer to have physical training sessions, maybe they go to a nutritionist, but often they don't go to a coach who looks at them in a holistic way and helps them with both their personal productivity and their wellness routine. So I really have an eye for detail. I'm kind of a specialist when it comes to hacking your habits and really building in habits, implementing them, creating habits that stick or sort of deprogramming and letting go of habits that aren't helping you anymore and that is kind of my special secret sauce and I realized that the best place to apply that was with women business owners, because often they don't have an HR department, they don't have anyone helping them figure out how to have these difficult conversations. They don't have anyone helping them figure out how to set boundaries or how to implement a wellness routine that works around and within their schedule. So we just we take the whole person, we look at what it is that they want to achieve in the next 90 days and we really clarify that and then we set out on the next phase of my program, which is simplification, and that's where a lot of people forget. You know that you don't necessarily want to add a lot of things. You might want to simplify and you have long winded answer to your initial question. But I got into it because it fascinates me, I feel like I am good at it and I had that personal experience of burnout and just acknowledging that women have a different style in a lot of cases and sometimes we were trying to fit into more of a male style mold and we can use what is naturally what we've already been acculturated toward when we can use those skills in a positive way, we can get further faster. So that's kind of what drew me to bringing my business and my wellness background together and coaching the specific niche.

Speaker 1:

I saw a funny meme the other day. It was a video and it said the type of motivational content women consume versus the type of motivational content men consume. It was just a little real. It was like five seconds and the women's one was a girl, like stretching, and it was like you're a queen, you're a princess, relax, honey, everything will be fine, right. And then the next thing is it shows a guy and he's lifting weights and it's like you're a punk, you're a cry baby, do you have a Bugatti? Yet you don't have a Bugatti, you're poor, like. That was like the difference, right, but it's so. There is a niche for you. There is a niche for what you're trying to do and what women respond to, because that might not be it right and that's what we had before, that's what everybody had.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, that was. That was the playing field before and now I think we're seeing that there are multiple playing fields now and I think my experience traveling traveling and living in other cultures just taught me that people do things different ways. Yes there's not one right way, but it is important to kind of build self awareness around what you're doing and why you're doing it. You know why you're motivated by your trainer kind of making fun of you per se. It's like just having the realization of that is actually part of the way that men tend to communicate in Western cultures. They have a hierarchical system and that's part of why you guys tease each other is because you're kind of teasing like who's who's the one who's got the edge in this particular area. Women on on the flip side tend to collaborate and they they tend to try to create a level playing field when they communicate. And I, when I was in graduate school, I took a class and we watched this video. It was. It was about cultural differences and communication styles and it stuck with me so much because it was showing young boys and young girls. And the boys were when they were at play. They were like did you see how far my dad hit the ball? You know they were. They were using their parents and their role models to create the hierarchy amongst themselves and then they would also, you know, challenge each other for their own hierarchy within their little group. And when they spoke, they didn't have to look each other in the eye. They could be off, you know, climbing a tree and saying, yeah, my dad hit the ball out of the park right. And the girls were all exchanging toys and things like that and they were trying to make each other feel very egalitarian eye contact and, and you think, like just from this young age, we're already communicating differently. We're already seeking different types of rewards or verbal affirmation from our, our friend group. It's very young.

Speaker 1:

Starts very young, starts very young. So you know, understanding and recognizing that those are realities of our civilization and we already have honestly like and I work with. There's a women's business group here called Aviatra and my cousin graduated from it. She sold two businesses and one of my tenants. Down in the basement here there's a commercial kitchen she rents. She's killing it. She was just named the Kentucky Businesswoman of the Year. She's a case. She owns a catering company, kills it. Has her own product line of jellies and jams. Also graduated from Aviatra. But these groups out here are constantly looking for women entrepreneurs. I mean it is a challenge for them. We want to promote everybody to start their own business. We want more women business owners. But if we are not catering essentially to their needs and helping them and offering them the support system that they need, even the ones you find could start dropping out of the business world and that's not what we want.

Speaker 2:

Yes, and I think that is why it is actually valuable for women in leadership, whether they are within the context of the corporate world or as individual entrepreneurs, that they seek out other women who are going through a similar experience. Because I do think and you know, like you said, yes, there's a lot of discussion around gender and I don't think we should. The point of this conversation is not to silo men and women into specific behaviors. However, there just are tendencies and if you find within your own self-awareness that you're, that you know you're feeling resistance out there in terms of what you're doing in your business or how you're being supported in your business or at home, seek out other people who are in a similar situation or who have gone through something similar before you. And a lot of times it's really juggling that mix of family life, professional life, personal self-care, and that is kind of something that it is changing, but I do still think it's women handle it differently than men in general.

Speaker 1:

And women tend to look for folks like you who can help them when they are starting to struggle. Men are more like I'll fight through it, right, right. And we, honestly, we probably need to go look for some help. But then again, if it's a guy that you're going to go get help from, you're going to be like, well, I don't want him judging me and thinking I'm weak because I had to come to him. It's like, no, this is what he does for a living man Like he. This is the point of it. But women, they don't think like that. The women are thinking like I need help, I need help.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, and I think a lot of times it's it's almost again like you said. We're we're trying to encourage women to have their own businesses and yet we're not necessarily at that point where that is is happening as rapidly maybe as men starting businesses, and men it's like they already had that system, was already kind of set up for them to step into that and keep communicating with each other. So even though, like a man doesn't necessarily feel the need to resolve his difficulties at work by going into some men's coaching group that you know that may not appeal at all, the guy is probably still going to talk to his buddies, whether the buddies are involved, you know, and so he's still getting some support in that way from his male colleagues who are, you know, or friends who have been in some type of similar situation. They're going to discuss it. That's true? Yeah, probably going to act upon it differently, but that sort of somewhat more built in than where, like the women's side, it would be more built in. You know the PTA that they're likely more women who are on the PTA discussing kids problems, but they might not be discussing entrepreneurial problems. So we're still kind of. We're still kind of flushing that out and that's why sometimes women need to like seek that group out because it may not just already be prebuilt for them in in the space that they're living.

Speaker 1:

When it's interesting too, because you do offer classes that help as well. Are these kind of one-on-one things? Are these? Are these things that are available to groups Like these women's entrepreneur groups I mentioned, where you can come in and you can say, hey, you know where you guys are building these entrepreneurs, you're a place for these entrepreneurs to come and everybody get together. But I feel like the framework that you've set up in like this class, you have the five step framework, boundary setting, ways to get your time back every week. Those are kind of things that I feel like it'd be great to have you go into some of the groups where these women entrepreneurs are already there and help them even more than what probably some of the people at these groups are aware of, like none of them are you. They're focused on the bottom line. They're focused on how to get your product to scale. They're focused on how to hire entrepreneurs. They're not necessarily focused on some of this stuff, and I think this would be a valuable addition to some of the stuff that I see them normally teach.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, I think it's kind of like soft skills versus hard skills, and when we think about networking for our businesses, we're often thinking about those hard skills. Or, you know, finance, marketing, things like that. And I do offer workshops on the soft skills and I do have a workshop reset your boundaries, reclaim your time. I'm actually going to be delivering that to a group out of Columbus Kappa, kappa, gamma, fraternity or sorority, and next Wednesday so I do do that for different women's groups even if they're not just entrepreneurial groups, but different types of get-togethers, and I can do it virtually or in person. And I also do have another workshop called how to Create Habits that Stick, which teaches you about the habit loop and how to really design an environment around changing particular habits, and we kind of break down a habit that you want to change and what that would look like.

Speaker 1:

I love it and we have a mutual friend, monica Tuck, and Monica met you in a networking group and Monica you know, obviously she runs a business very similar to mine, a very friendly person, very knowledgeable in the marketing world. Give me and it may not be Monica, but give me some of the things that maybe like a testimonial or a case study of some of the stuff you've had to deal with and how you've worked through some of that stuff with one of the entrepreneurs that you've worked with in the past.

Speaker 2:

The first thing that comes to mind is I had a woman who is an architect and also working out of her home and she has two kids. Very good architect, had good business, got good referrals, so you know, in terms of the money coming in, that wasn't really a problem. Where she found herself having difficulties was in balancing it all. So in other words, she would kind of push all of her work off until late at night and she'd be drafting and stuff in the middle of the night after the kids had gone to bed, because a lot of her time got eaten up during the day by doing tasks within her home getting her kids off to school and, you know, picking them up from school. And she wanted that was part of why she worked from home. She wanted to be there for her kids and to be able to do that. And we basically restructured her schedule and her priorities so that she was no longer staying up and drafting at night. She was getting work done during the day. She brought in some outside support within the house to do some housekeeping, which seems like a no-brainer, as you, you know, discuss the situation, but when you're in the situation it can be. There's a lot of different reasons why people might resist bringing in some outside help to help them with those type of tasks. And then also there were some conversations that she needed to have with her family and with her clients, and she needed to set some boundaries around her work times. She didn't need to just take appointments at any time that someone asked if she could be there. There were obviously exceptions Life isn't perfect and sometimes you need to meet with clients on their schedule but in general you can have boundaries and you can have a framework for when you want to work. And all of this really just allowed her to feel like she had taken control of the brains again. She had a schedule that supported her, allowed her to get some physical activity, allowed her to be present and at home with her kids when they came home from school. They took on some additional responsibilities within the home that they weren't necessarily doing before, and they made it more of a game, so the kids actually enjoyed it. It became more fun, and a lot of times women are just assuming that they have to do it all because they've been doing it all, and when they start having those conversations with their kids and their partners, it can change, and so it's just being open to that and being willing to consistently communicate, and the same thing with your clients. Your clients are not necessarily going to drop you because you say you can't make that particular time that they first suggested, and that's that accommodating nature that a lot of times women don't want to say no. They want to serve any of the best possible experience to the client, and that's very admirable initially, but that's not long term, it's not sustainable long term, and so you just get some clarity around that and then you start setting up some really simple systems for yourself that you can continuously implement and refine, and it just helps you feel like you've got control again, because a lot of times it doesn't feel like you have control.

Speaker 1:

It definitely doesn't. Yeah, somebody Dan Martell, I think, is his name he wrote a book about business and structuring your business and all these other things and he said your inbox is nothing more than a public to do list of other people's goals on your time, that's an excellent descriptor Agreed. And it is. And you know what I had to get an admin and he's a big fan of like there is a business growth ladder I can't remember exactly what he calls it, but at the bottom the first thing they say you should do is get an admin, somebody just to check your emails, answer phone calls, set your schedule for you. Before you go doing marketing, before you go doing hiring you know COOs and everything to manage that stuff. Before you get anybody hire your first salesperson, get that together first, get that person in place to just take all of that nonsense off your, off your plate, the things that you. What is your time worth If you can pay someone in the Philippines, you know, $6 an hour or whatever in the world it is to do this stuff, and generally it's like monthly, like they'll charge you like a thousand bucks a month or something just to do all this stuff for you. Or if you know somebody, they can do this, like my sister-in-law. She works our front desk here at the co-working space and she does that all day for me just keeps an eye on my email, texts me if something urgent is happening and then schedules things for me If it's something that I can put off to another time. She scheduled you right, like the whole conversation with you was her so, and it looked like it was me. But it takes so much time off my plate and then I can go meet with clients. I can do these kind of things that are going to bring us in more revenue, instead of me sitting in email half the day. And people I think they don't realize and I've had this problem with graphic designer, web designer, people that I worked with in the past they think, oh, my company charges $300 an hour for my services, why don't I start my own business, charge $300 an hour and let's see, I have eight hours in the day, so I'm going to make this much money. No, you're not. First of all, half of their revenues probably goes to some private equity company or whoever, and that's why they're charging $300 an hour, and they have a bunch of people underneath that support all this stuff. But you're going to be in QuickBooks half the day. You're going to be not just in QuickBooks. You're going to have to chase clients down for money. You're going to have to remember who you owe.

Speaker 2:

It's a lot of admin when you run a business, an excellent teacher about yourself. So when you get to start your business. If you don't have self-awareness, you're going to need to get some. And I think that's what you're saying is kind of just knowing that having an additional person there to manage the scheduling type tasks, the administrative tasks, that can free your mind, it can free your time and it can create the space for you to do the high value work and that is really important. So, yes, that's definitely something that. Yeah, that's another piece of the puzzle that I help women with. I typically work with women who have service-based businesses and they have fewer than 10 employees or subcontractors and a lot of times they're in that phase of growth where they have gotten to the edge on them doing the work, so they're maximizing their hours, kind of like you were saying with your wife, like you maxed out on how many facials she could do so she decided she should bring someone else in. But there's that push and pull in being able to find the right person, train the right person and move into being more of a manager than the person who's providing working in versus working on your business. So I help women a lot with unraveling that and getting some space and realizing that they don't have to have it perfect to get that next person on board and how do we create some really simple systems to document what they're already doing using? We have tons of technology now, but video is an excellent teacher and resource that it lives on, like you do, at once, and then you can leverage it and the VA can leverage it, and a lot of times you don't even have to create the video. You get the new assistant to create a video of what they think it should be and then you send it back to you and you do a little audio memo. So it's just thinking outside the box a little bit and recognizing that we all need support, like we really this idea, our culture is very much about independence and you know gung-ho, like you're going to claim the mountain for yourself. But we don't climb Everest alone. You know. You have a team, a group, so you do want to look out and see where you can find support and it doesn't always have to be paid support.

Speaker 1:

So oh yeah, oh yeah. And now do you often find that a lot of women, instead of being more growth focused, they have these like lifestyle businesses, and do you? Okay? And then with that, do you see yourself helping them to create more growth businesses out of these lifestyle businesses, or see the potential that they have and then work with them beyond this initial phase and be an ongoing coach for them?

Speaker 2:

Yeah, I think we have like a little bit of a negative connotation with the lifestyle business term because I feel like it feels like it discredits the work that they're doing in some way, because, at least the way that I've kind of heard about it a lot of times, it's you know, if you're looking for funding for a business, they're not going to fund a lifestyle business. They're looking for somebody who wants to create a big, huge company. And again, that's where the male-female dynamic often differs and men are out there to grow the biggest, the baddest, you know, like as quickly as possible. Women are over there going oh well, wait, I have to pick my kid up from school. How do I do this business? And still pick my kid up from school. That doesn't mean that their ambition is any less. It's just that they are trying to create more of a balanced piece with all the different pieces of their puzzle. And I think that we haven't necessarily been taught either to kind of like we don't know the channels. And when we do know the channels and we start getting out there looking for venture capital and things, it's like the doors are shut, not so much anymore. I do think in the last five years, like it's really opened up a lot. But yeah, to answer your question, sure I can most certainly help women go from a lifestyle business that maybe they're not taking as seriously or not seeing the potential of as much as they could. But what's really important is to understand what they want Because, again, like you were just saying, like people don't necessarily realize what's involved with growing to that next stage and maybe they don't want to grow to that next stage because this is working for them and to me there's nothing bad about that. I think that's like you know, that energy of creating something of value, putting it out there but still being able to do the things that you value, is super great. Like I don't feel like that's something that we should. We don't have to turn every lifestyle business into a big, booming company, but if you want to, if you want to figure out what the potential is and you want to kind of get out of your own way, then yes, I think that having some type of coaching support in particular is very helpful for.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, I agree. I agree what sounds like you can help in a lot of different ways and sounds like your business is doing well and you're in a really good position to help other people. Your demeanor is very calming and you seem like a very helpful person, where mine is very out of control and short, quick answers, and that's that's how I roll. But again, yeah, I'm one of these guys, so this is my problem.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, we all have. We all have our specialties, right, I went on a podcast with this great guy and his podcast he names every person who comes on his show. They're entrepreneurs and he gives them a nickname, and mine was the balanced boss. So oh, yes, Okay yeah getting that, that demeanor, I do think I help people. I kind of help people get a little more grounded or stable. That's just in my nature.

Speaker 1:

That's awesome. That's awesome, that's a great skill to have and it's this is like almost the perfect business for you, then to be able to help other people and do it in a way that feels very helpful and is calming, because they're probably going through a super stressful time and they, they really need stuff like this. So tell everybody how they can reach out to you, tell them how they can find you, your website, any opportunities to you know where you're going to be doing any kind of like a seminar or any of that kind of stuff.

Speaker 2:

Sure, so all of my website, my social media, everything is my name using my first initial S, like smile. So sbrookbaileycom is my website. And then I'm on Instagram, facebook and LinkedIn. At sbrookbailey, I have a weekly Instagram live on Wednesdays at 2pm Eastern, where I interview other business owners who support women business owners in some way with their expertise, and we have talked about everything from hypnosis yesterday to marketing, so it's a big perspective. If you want to get a feel for what I do, I do have a free masterclass reset your boundaries, reclaim your time, and you can sign up for that on my website. The URL is sbrookbaileycom. Forward slash masterclass dash registration. And yeah, just feel free to to connect with me through the website or through social media. You can direct message me if you'd like, and I'm happy to to hop on a call to answer any questions if you're curious about coaching in this capacity.

Speaker 1:

Amazing. I love it. Well, thanks so much for doing what you do. I think it's going to help a lot of people. It's going to keep a lot of entrepreneurs in the game is what I'm hoping, especially the female entrepreneurs. We need more of them, and the ones we do have we got to make sure that they they become inspirations for other people, that they can then go out and start businesses. And also, I mean, just be an inspiration for your family, If not outside, be inspiration for your kids. Show them that you can do these things and that you are a good mom, a good partner to your husband, a good you know, the whole time you're doing it.

Speaker 2:

Absolutely Well. Thanks for having me on and thanks for all of the the discussions that you have around entrepreneurship, because the more we talk about it, the more we figure out ways to resolve some of this stuff that that holds us back or blocks us. So it's nice.

Speaker 1:

That's right. Well, thanks so much, bro, all right, thank you. Thanks for joining us on this week's episode of Side Hustle City. Well, you've heard from our guests, now let's hear from you. Join our community on Facebook, side Hustle City. It's a group where people share ideas, share their inspirational stories and motivate each other to be successful and turn their side hustle into their main hustle. We'll see you there and we'll see you next week on the show. Thank you.

Navigating Challenges as an Entrepreneur
(Cont.) Navigating Challenges as an Entrepreneur
Holistic Coaching for Women Entrepreneurs
Gender Differences in Support for Women Entrepreneurs
(Cont.) Gender Differences in Support for Women Entrepreneurs
Work-Life Balance for Women in Business
Discussion on Entrepreneurship and Side Hustles