Side Hustle City

Keith Goode on Revolutionizing HR Tech & Entrepreneurial Growth

February 21, 2024 Adam Koehler with Keith Goode Season 5 Episode 10
Side Hustle City
Keith Goode on Revolutionizing HR Tech & Entrepreneurial Growth
Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

Unlock the potential of your human capital with insights from Keith Goode, the visionary Vice President of ZeroedIn, as he transforms the way you think about HR software. This episode of Side Hustle City, hosted by Adam Koehler, dives deep into Keith's entrepreneurial journey from startup to success, showcasing how ZeroedIn has revolutionized HR systems—merging payroll, learning management, and applicant tracking into a seamless platform that catalyzes business growth. Side hustlers dreaming of high-growth ventures and seasoned CEOs alike will discover invaluable strategies for scaling businesses through efficient workforce management.

We delve into the transformative power of HR technology in overcoming hiring hurdles, offering fresh perspectives on HR innovation and emphasizing the critical role of human capital as not just an asset but the entire portfolio of a company. Join us as we explore the entrepreneurial spirit that turns challenges into opportunities, proposing solutions that can skyrocket career trajectories and reshape the business landscape.

Our conversation also highlights the strategic journey of building a software company that fills a market void, striking the perfect balance between proprietary and customizable analytics solutions. From leveraging AI and making strategic funding decisions to capturing investor attention, we cover the essentials that have propelled Keith's company to the forefront of the HR software industry. With a focus on 'clear box' analytics, sustainable growth, and market adaptability, learn how companies like ZeroedIn attract the right investor attention and stand out in the competitive HR tech domain. Discover the keys to starting and scaling high-growth businesses, the importance of strategic innovation, and the transformative journey of entrepreneurship with Keith Goode on Side Hustle City.

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Speaker 2:

Welcome to Side Hustle City and thanks for joining us. Our goal is to help you connect to real people who found success turning their side hustle into a main hustle, and we hope you can too. I'm Adam Kaler. I'm joined by Kyle Stevie, my co-host. Let's get started, all right? Welcome back, everybody to the Side Hustle City podcast. Once again, we have an awesome guest for you, this time in the HR space, keith. Good how you doing, keith.

Speaker 3:

I'm great Thanks for having me today. I really appreciate it.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, thanks for coming in all the way from like the north of Baltimore area. There Kind of explain where you're at.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, so kind of that. Baltimore, washington andapolis area is where I work and do a lot of work with the federal government as well as private organizations. So mid-Atlantic, sometimes I say the Bay Area, the other Bay Area.

Speaker 2:

That's a good one. The Tuscany Bay Area, yep, and you're with a company called Zeroed In and it sounds like it's a software for HR kind of thing, and I think a lot of our Side Hustle people as they grow their business. This is one of the things I ran into. Growing my businesses is eventually you're going to have to deal with people. I mean, if you're going to scale, you need more people and you eventually get to the point where it's like it can't just be you anymore. Software can only take you so far as a solopreneur. Eventually you need more bodies, but then you need software to manage those other bodies and data on top of that, and the best thing is to find a platform that can give you the proper data and also uses new technologies, instead of something that's kind of tied into the past, some legacy piece of software that will. You know, it's so big and so tied into so many things. It's hard for them to change the technology and a lot of times, companies like yours can pivot and can be a little bit more flexible with what it's doing and you utilize some of these newer things that are coming out. So explain a little bit about what ZeroDin does.

Speaker 3:

Absolutely so you know. First question to you I have, adam, is he talked to 99% of business owners? What are they going to say is their most valuable assets?

Speaker 2:

Well, they think them. That's what they think. It's people.

Speaker 3:

It's people, yeah, but do they manage and do they have the same information and methods to focus on their employees as they do other assets? Are they looking at, getting and tracking and using advanced technologies to get the most value out of their most important assets? And what ZeroDin does is we help those clients, usually large, medium sized to large organizations that have, you know, north of maybe 500 to 1,000 employees. We help them to identify and look at things about those employees and data about that employee that might be housed in all kinds of different systems. So HR by itself is notorious for multiple different platforms. You've got payroll systems, you've got HRIS systems, you've got learning management systems, you've got performance management systems, you've got ACS for candidate tracking systems, right? So I just named about five or six. And guess what? If you're best to breed, those systems typically don't talk to each other. Yes, you could go with a work day or other types of platforms and they say they have everything, but then you know, maybe not everything, maybe you still want to have your candidates in a different system. So, from an HR perspective, this information is siloed, it's all over the place and, by the way, all the systems are going to say, yes, we do analytics and we have analytics, but it's just going to be in that silo. What ZeroDin does is we help bridge that gap between those systems, bring that data together, aggregate it, correlate it and provide it back to leaders, to managers, to the organization as a whole, so they can make better decisions about their most valuable assets their people.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, that totally makes sense, and you know what A lot of the folks that I deal with that are side hustlers in the startup software space and even myself. We had a platform called Vanda, me and two other co-founders. We were getting it going and then one of the co-founders ended up having three kids in three years and that kind of slowed things down a little bit. But the one cool thing is is we were trying to connect, make it easier for people to go on, create a profile on our platform and essentially that would be their resume and the fields would match up directly with the fields that an employer would come in and say hey, I'm looking for a web designer. I want them to have three years of experience, I want them to do this, I want them to know HTML, I want them to CSS and the better. All these fields match up. Then the employer gets sent these profiles and they get sent 10 profiles. They don't get sent 10,000 profiles like some of these keyword matching systems, and that's one of the things we saw in HR software that really sucked was that these hiring managers would just get way too many resumes. Most of them are unqualified. You get a stack of a thousand of them and the guy that's actually good is probably in the middle and you're going to go through what the top 10 maybe, and it's just it's so inefficient. So we were trying to find an inefficient way to do that and what you guys do is actually make, say, like, my software better, because I we had to talk to the ATS and everybody uses a different ATS in applicant tracking system. Talk a little bit about that. Talk a little about these applicant tracking systems and how they work, but HR in general is a mess. So, guys, if you're out there listening to this podcast right now, there is always an opportunity to disrupt the HR space and at one point I think M&A was higher for startups in the HR space and any other business function. So there's, there's available opportunities.

Speaker 3:

Absolutely the applicant tracking systems and the candidate tracking systems. I mean tons of them out there. You know. Think for if you're not aware of it, you think you know matchcom, but for hiring people, right, and they do. There's some really great technology out there to skim across all that content and try to line the right people to the right opportunities, and that's great. And you know, again, that's a fairly saturated business model out there, but where I would say that the HR's opportunity is for the next step, right. So your organization was spending thousands of dollars for the applicant tracking system, for measuring, you know, and getting people in and finding the best candidates and linking them to the best opportunity, right, then what? You bring them on board, you give them a different employee ID. Now, all that data that you just spent thousands of dollars on trying to find the right candidate, how are you going to correlate that back to the employee next year, five years from now? Was it a valuable hire? Not only that, can you take the history of that person and use that as a statistical model to say who's the right type of hire to get them, not just to fulfill that position, but maybe to for succession planning, so that you have people align five, 10, 15 years now from now going into those types of positions. So you know there's a lot more to it. Like I said, I think there's a lot of saturation in that initial market, but I think there's tons of opportunity to aggregate, to trend and to build statistical models on top of that. That can add value.

Speaker 2:

And every time I mean technology moves so quickly. I think the key thing here is you guys identified an issue that people might not even know they have. They know they have it, but they're not aware enough to go out and find something or build something. And the crazy thing is I own a digital ad agency, so people call us up with these problems that they want us to solve all the time and it's like oh, you know what we need help with. We need help connecting all these different systems together that we have and bringing it all together onto one dashboard. And I'm like okay, great. And then, when I built it, I'm like you guys know, you could just like sell this, like you could license this and sell this. This is a product like you're not the only company that has this and why spend $100,000 or more with my company building this software? And just, it's going to help you, obviously, but why not? Why not license it? You know, and I think a lot of people that do that are people like the founder of Zeroed In. They see a problem and they you know hey, I can fix this, let me do it.

Speaker 3:

That's right, that's right. So myself and our CEO, chris Moore, we start working together back in the early 90s and we've developed a learning management system one of those silos in HR and we found quickly that HR systems are data rich but information poor. They're great about what they do, but across you know the employee, across all those different silos, it was weak. So after that company was acquired and acquired and acquired that's when we started Zeroed In and the idea again is to take all that information and make it available, get the value. We don't Zeroed In, we don't do the transaction processing, we're not signing people up for learning, we're not, you know, the applicant tracking system. We're not paying people, but we take those transactions and we aggregate those and we build statistical models over that and then present it back to the people. That can make better decisions without information. That's where the opportunity is.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, because I've got a client that actually Dynamic Works Institute and what they do is they help people kind of get back into work. Right, some of their clients are people that have, you know, been locked up for a while and they need to figure out what's been going on the last three or four years in the work world. So they have a lot of training modules and training courses that help these people get back on their feet. And there's other people, older adults, who want to get back into the workforce, etc. Etc. Right, you can name a lot of different client groups that they work with. So a company like that, that's not what you guys are doing. But you would work with a company like DWI and you would get them up to speed. You'd say, hey, look at all this data you guys have here. But then look at all this data that your customer because their customer are other companies, right, and even businesses that want to train their staff on new things in their whatever in HR say, for example, hey, we want to train you on a new piece of software we want to use, go to DWI, take the course, boom. So there's companies, not just within a company. If you own a company. If you have a software company, your clients and you could be sharing valuable data together.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, absolutely, and you know, from a technology perspective, the opportunities to move data around has been fantastic. You know, obviously there's open APIs out there which help facilitate, mostly on the transactional level. We use them sometimes for more aggregated data, but when you're working with organizations that have thousands of employees, those APIs are mostly for hey, update this record, tell me what this person's status is, or whatever. When you need send me 10,000 records for one day of all the people that have changed something about their employee record, then we typically look at the more traditional file formats as a great method to transfer that information. But again, opportunity with that, having you know that ETL, extract, transform and load experience, there's always going to be need for that type of skill set as well.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, and then also visualizing the data. There's a lot of people that when they see that data come in they see those spreadsheets their eyes glaze over. They don't know what to do. They're looking at it for three hours trying to figure out what it all means. You know, there is something to be said about being able to build a business that can not just deliver this data but also visualize it in a way that employees can actually pick up on what's happening and do that quickly so they're not wasting time. I mean, software is about efficiency, right.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, yeah, and that's a challenge out there. I mean, we're, you know, especially in the HR space. You know, we typically in the past have been working with people that are very hands-on or very great communicators, but when it comes to reading technical graphs, and digging into data, maybe not their forte. So again, we have to look at that as an opportunity to say how can we present this information better? And where there's unique opportunity, there is with AI, artificial intelligence and not you know. You hear that all the time. Everybody's going to say, oh, we have AI here. Let's get into a little bit more on how it can be used to help solve a problem. And I think that's where you know where you get. The marketing fluff goes away and we start talking about how it can be used. And from a zero to in perspective, there's two aspects it's about summarizing and explaining. So let's suppose we've got a dashboard for an executive that has 12 different measures, 20 different graphs on it tables the gamut. Well, we could throw that data to an AI generator and or LLM large language model and it can go and look at that data and just summarize what are these data? You know, hey, there's, they can look at. It could come back with trending. It could come back. We've noticed, you know. We could take the data and have it in multiple periods from, say, the year, or year to date, or month to month, and it can look across that data and then explain it because the LLMs they don't. They're not great at at numeric calculations, they're really great at just understanding language. So you throw the data, that already has the calculations done. It can look across the dimensions of that data and then help explain and summarize what that data means, and that's a great thing. So now the, the executive has a summary, some of that dashboard, a summarization of that dashboard. The other area that I think LLM and AI can help out with is then taking it a step further and drilling in and drilling on, say, a subset of department, a job type, and then the AI, or the AI, the LLM, can say you know, there's been differences between this job and this job. You may want to focus on this and then providing that, that dashboard for the executive to then actually drill in and get those results. That's adding more value to something that's already been around.

Speaker 2:

That's right. That's right. And I think what we're saying here and for a lot of people that you know have a startup in mind or maybe they're they're, you know, at a nine to five job and they're just going in every day. They're not big fans of it. They want to do something, because one of the hardest things and I mean you, you I'm sure you understand this, keith one of the hardest things is, as an entrepreneur, having that mindset, having that desire to be an entrepreneur. Working a nine to five job is painful, and going in and taking orders from someone else when you really want to be the boss right, it's so tough. But the way to get out of that is to do something like what you guys did identify something, keep, pay attention, don't just go into a company. And if you hate the company, that's probably an even bigger identifier the fact that they need to do something better. So if you, if you're in a, say, you're in HR, you take a look at this, take this into the boss, say, look, this is something that you know can make our company better, make our lives better, and maybe that makes your job better. Until you can figure out what the heck you want to do, maybe. Maybe you identify some other problems and there isn't a zeroed in that you can recommend. So then you end up going out and you make something. You fix it right, right right.

Speaker 3:

You know what? And even in large organizations, the entrepreneurial spirit can be so powerful. I, you know, I've worked in large companies and zeroed in. We're a small company and that's wonderful, I love it. It has its own challenges at times, but you know, I've worked in large organizations as well, and even in large organizations, if you can come up with a model, if you can say, hey, I think there's value here, I think there's something behind it, I don't know a single manager that would say, yeah, I don't want to look at that. You know, I think every smart manager would say, yeah, like, let's explain, let's look at what the value is. And so entrepreneurs can exist everywhere, and I would say, sometimes even in an organization that could be just as important, just as valuable for career growth.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, use your time there to do something entrepreneurial. Use your entrepreneurial mind. If you, if this was your business, what would you do? Like would you? Would you just come into work every day, sit down and just do a thing, or would you constantly be trying to improve your processes, get more data, analyze that data and make the company more streamlined?

Speaker 3:

That's what you would do right, exactly exactly, yep, and I'd listen to podcasts like this to help motivate me to do that.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, I mean it's kind of your responsibility as an employee, especially, you know, in America. I mean the auto industry. Let's look at what how Japan, you know, ate our lunch during the 80s. I mean it was because they had a kind of bottom up managerial kind of strategy or a troubleshooting kind of strategy. Somebody on the line see stuff every day that the person above them does not see. So they made it to where you could go up the ladder and say stuff where in America it wasn't like that. You know, the CEO thinks he knows everything, but he's not on the line every day building cars, putting things together, creating more efficient operations. And that's what the Japanese did and that's why they were able to charge less for vehicles. And you know, in the 80s they just built better, more efficient, cheaper vehicles that lasted longer than we did here in the United States. So you're in that same situation at a company. But pay attention to the way the company is managed, pay attention to the way things are done. If they're not open to changing the way they do things, being more efficient, that probably isn't the type of place you want to be. But figure out what they're doing wrong where there's opportunity and go start a company doing that. I mean, that's essentially what you guys did.

Speaker 3:

Absolutely. That's exactly what we did. We saw that weakness in the marketplace and we tried to capitalize on it. And you know I've been in the with HR data for many years, going back into the early 90s, and you know I can remember in the 2000s and you know a lot of jobs being taken over to India. We still see that now, even technology jobs right, and always said, well, okay, you know it's a market decision and it is. But where it's not a market decision is America's ability and our workforce ability to be creative. You look at the workforces around the world and China being a fantastic, great workforce. They can throw bodies at it, but can they bring the level of creativity? No, that's, I think, what we have to focus from a value perspective, moving forward on.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, the US is definitely. People here are taught to be more creative. They're encouraged to be creative. They're encouraged to think outside the box. We definitely have the entrepreneurial mindset here. Actually, it wasn't too long ago I watched a show on the education system here and how versus China. And how China yes, they are beating us in the sciences and math and things like that, but they're essentially Robots. They're trained to be robots and we're not like that here. We're trained to question the system. We're trained to and this goes back to what we were just talking about Question why you're doing things the way you are in your HR department if that's your job or whatever department you're in Question why things are done the way they are, why your job is so hard to do, because it probably shouldn't be that hard to do. There's probably a solution out there with all the softwares and everything else out there. There's got to be something out there. And I mean you guys, as you know, these entrepreneurs going from you know and I in going from an unknown software company to somebody who now works with government Works, with bigger companies, you know, that's a big transition being able to go from, from an unknown, into at least your first customer that can get you credibility. Talk about, talk about that. Path was zeroed in how that work.

Speaker 3:

Well, that's a great, great point and I'm glad you brought that up. It really comes down to those initial opportunities and and being able to successfully capitalize on them and fulfill those, and Once you have that success, it can breed other success along the way. Yes, there's going to be failures in there as well, but it's you know. We identified and worked with people, made them successful. They move to other roles, bring you back into it. So there's a lot of echoes on too, which is fantastic Relationships, keeping those relationships strong and, again, making sure that what you're delivering is adding that value.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, and I'm looking through some of your stuff now too. I mean these dashboards that you guys have. I mean that's added value right there. That's that's giving you the opportunity. That's like it's helping your startup to get less phone calls about like, hey, what do I do here, what do I do there? Because you've already built it in.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, and what's great about those that you you know they're fantastic great dashboards are looking, but what's interesting about that is we've built a Platform that is configurable not customizable, but configurable. What that means is that all those dashboards, the data behind it we met it we described in metadata, which is data about data, and then aggregate that information, store that into our Data cubes, and it could be anything. It could be HR related. That's where our business background is. We've had companies come to us and say you know they do power generation. They say we really like what you're doing with your dashboards. Could you do it for Recording how much power generation we're like? Absolutely, because it's just metadata, data about data, and once we define that, we can then push it into the cubes and then have it displayed on dashboards that are also configurable. People can identify what types of graphs to display, how to slice it, how to dice it and or security behind it. So you and I could be looking at the same dashboard, but you have Managerial responsibility from one organization, I have the other, and the system is going to know that and only display the information that you're entitled to view. So that's that's an important concept. Obviously, a lot of this could be done in tools like power BI and Tableau. But then you're talking about organizations that their business might be HR, their business might be something else. They have to get expertise to come in and develop that, then to maintain it, and if that person leaves, who's gonna maintain it? Who's gonna update it, you know? And so having a platform that can do that gives a stronger Viability and framework platform for for the client.

Speaker 2:

But again, some companies are gonna they're gonna try to do that. They're gonna hire a software development company, they're gonna hire a you know a freelance Tableau expert or whatever, and they're gonna say all come in, we've got this unique problem that we need to solve. And guess what? It's probably not that unique to you. It's. It's probably something that a lot of companies are dealing with, and you got a bunch of people out there spending hundreds of thousands of dollars To create this solution. By the time they get done with it, it may even be outdated. I mean it's. You know, it could take years for some of these companies to get this stuff done because they put things on the back burner. But you know why not go out there, get something out of the box that already has all the tools and everything available to it. And what I like about this? You know I'm a user experience designer, so I always think about all the things we could put in there, and all the times clients are like dump all this in there, put all this. You got to talk them off a cliff sometimes because they want everything to be on one screen. They want everything to be. But you've break, broken this up pretty well, like the way you guys built this out, you've got like a workforce overview, you've got your turnover Screen, you've got a compensation screen, talent acquisition screen, talent learning performs, and, like the talent acquisition, so like for what we were doing with our startup, you got your open requisitions, candidates, hiring stages, hiring sources, fill rates, all kind of on that one screen that everybody can could take a look at and make decisions based on that stuff.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, and then on the same screen, we could pull in information about, you know, data from those people from three years ago that is now in their HRIS system. So it can. It can bring in data from multiple different sources. Even though you're looking as a talent acquisition Position, there's no reason as that could stop us to compare number of candidates to number of hires and number of employees In a given job today. And that data is coming one from coming from the ATS, the others coming from their HRIS system. No problem, wow, a common platform when?

Speaker 2:

how many a? How many ATS is? Do you guys work? Because we are doing our startup? We had, I don't know it was like four or five of the popular ones or whatever that people used. I mean, how many of you encountered do? Do we even know how many are out there? Keep up it up.

Speaker 3:

But you know, the good thing from our perspective is, the data is, yes, it's one system versus another, but the the domain of that information is is similar. You know, you're looking at, obviously, candidates and their information Experience. You're looking at past history. You're looking at, oh oh, everything from don't forget, you know, drug testing. That comes in there too. So the domain of the knowledge, domain of the data, is very similar. It's just gonna be possibly broken into multiple different tables from the different sources. But I think being able to understand the domain helps you then figure out OK, how does this ATS versus this one handle that data? And once you understand and understand the domain, you can pull it together, and so you yeah, all totally makes sense.

Speaker 2:

And you guys were like, hey look, there's a bunch of companies out here that would have to build this thing. They're all going to probably build it in a different way. They're probably not all going to think as deeply about it as you, because you're building this specifically as a product to help people. It has to work. You've got to think about all the different nooks and crannies and the way it's going to be used, and they could go out and spend so much money building something like this when there's stuff that's already here and this is what I'm trying to tell people to listen to this podcast is there are opportunities in your company right now to build something like this or at least introduce a solution like this and then use it. Learn from it, because it's not just the HR stuff that's out there. That's. That's probably a mess by a bunch of stuff, and if you're not a user experience expert, you know if you haven't done. You know websites and software, for you know 20 years. By using this stuff, think about how it's used, think about how it's built, think about how it's been designed. This, if you want to go out and you want to start your own software product or just make it better for your company somehow. Or maybe you're leading a project. Maybe they do want to start up something like this call a software development company and build something. You, you know what you need, you know what is available, because you've used something that actually works in the past.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, yeah, this might resonate with you and I'd love to get your take on it. So we kind of see in the marketplace kind of three, three avenues. You've got the black boxes right, the you know, give us the data in this format and we'll give you this. And you have no idea how they're calculating it. You have no idea where it's coming from. Well, you know where it's coming from. You're giving me the data, but you're not sure if it's you know the calculations that are going into it Got its values. You know there might be a certain price points to that. Then, on the other end of the spectrum, you've got the no box right when you're going to hire an ETL person. You're going to hire a developer, say on Tableau or be a platform development. You're going to hire a data analyst and you're going to hire a business. So for people at, you know 100,000, so that's 400,000 a year, right. So why not something in the middle which would? I would say we are kind of that clear box, right. Well, it's a platform, but it brings in the data but allows you to then configure your measurements based off of how you need them to be calculated and then your organizational structure. So it's that middle ground between those two extremes.

Speaker 2:

That's right. Well, data is so important nowadays for every organization being able to tap into data, being able to access it in a way that makes sense, that people are going to be able to see and say, hey, I get it, I'm going to, I'm going to take action based on this data that I'm seeing. And now you've got AI. How do we incorporate and you talked about it how do we incorporate AI into this? Every piece of software nowadays seems like it needs some kind of AI thing involved in it. Now you guys I mean you're obviously staying up on on technology and incorporating that into your platform. How did you guys get this off the ground? Was this something that you had to go out and raise money for? Was it something that was self-funded, like, how did that work to get this going? Because this is a lot. You guys have a lot in here, yeah, right.

Speaker 3:

Again, it started with understanding that need and we're Bootstrap. We're Bootstrap development. We came in and grew at the speed of new client we could get, and that was up until about three years ago where we finally took on some private equity funding. So for probably 12, 13, 14 years we were self-funded, privately held, and we grew at the speed of get one client, make them happy, stay with them, keep them going, get another client. And you know we grew up in the dot com era. You know we had a software company back then, a learning management system, and we saw the dot com, we saw the people you know caching out on that VC funded and you know we also, you know, lost it at the when that bubble burst, it burst. So we're very conservative in our growth, growing at the speed that we can add value and it works up until a point. In today's world you kind of need to have that big capital behind you if you want to go big and yeah. So that's kind of our story.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, that's it. And guys like, if you're listening to what he's saying here, this is the perfect type of company to invest in. If you're an investor, you want to find a company that has grown on its own through customers, right through actually having paid customers, not selling vaporware, you know you've got a product that you're able to build, bootstrap and build on your own. So, as an investor, I'm not investing in the development of the product and the early sales. I'm getting in when you've already done all that stuff. And then you know, you guys, I mean, this thing's been around a while now too. So as a you know private equity, I'm not looking for the 100x growth. I'm looking, you know, maybe to triple my money, quadruple my money a little bit. So I feel safe going in investing in a management team that is proving that they could build a business, a sustainable business, and there is a need out for it. And then, on top of that, you're adapting to technology.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, you're 100% right, are you sure? We haven't worked together the last five years.

Speaker 2:

Don't worry. I've seen enough company pitches. I've been in enough VC rooms looking at pitches. So yeah, I mean, and it's always the company that's like the software's not there. This is what we think we can do. Here's our total addressable market. Here's who we think we can go after. You know you always see those decks but they don't have any customers. You have no customers. We don't know if there is a market for your product yet. You know we can kind of speculate if there would be, but you know you got to find 10 or 12 of those companies to invest in and hope one of them actually makes it out.

Speaker 3:

Right, right, and there's also synergies too. You could find you know two of them and maybe put them together and you've got something even larger.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, that's a private equity move right there. That's what they're doing. So, yeah, and maybe even for you guys, maybe monstercom or somebody comes along and says, hey, we don't want to have to compete with these guys. Or one of these big ATS has come through and say why don't we just incorporate this? They're already working with ours and and then we get data from other ATS's even that we can maybe incorporate.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, we've actually have worked with other software Organizations in the HR space, where we partner with them and we're their analytics solution. So, instead of them building out an analytics reporting solution, you know they may have already the greatest transactional based process and whatever it might be, whether it's learning, whether it's performance, whether it's reward and recognition and they need that, that additional Analytics and reporting on top of it. We can fit right in, we can brand to as if it was part of their solution and we we have that for a couple couple clients that we work with that's amazing.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, keith man, this is awesome. Tell people, tell people how they can reach out to you, how they can reach out to zeroed in and and who are you looking for specifically?

Speaker 3:

Right, so well. First of all, anyone that is interested in this topic, interested either in HR or analytics, we'd love to talk to you, love to carry on the conversation. I can be reached through my LinkedIn, which is Keith a good and the company. Our Website is zeroed in comm, so you can reach us there as well. And Again, anyone that might be interested in and taking this a step further, we'd love to have a conversation with them, whether it's partnership, whether it's hey, we need we need to solve some problems within our organization, around people, and we think data and analytics could help. Love to carry that conversation on.

Speaker 2:

Awesome, keith. Well, I appreciate you coming on sharing a little insight about from a successful software company and how all that worked out for you guys, and it sounds like you guys are kicking butt. You got some great, great clients. I'm looking at your website. I mean it's impressive government clients, private clients. I mean yeah, I mean this is. This is really impressive. And I love talking to people like you who've actually done it, who've actually grown something and built something, because you know you are the people that we want to bring on to inspire other people to do something similar and really change your life and then affect the lives of other people. That not just the companies that you're gonna improve, but the people that work for those companies. When they become more efficient, they make more money, they help out their employees, they take care of their employees. So I mean it. It spreads far and wide.

Speaker 3:

All right, it does. That's you nailed it. Thank you and Adam. Thanks for your time today. I definitely appreciate it. I hope your audience gets something out of it and it can Take some value away from it, because that's what it's all about.

Speaker 2:

It is what it's all about, keith. I really appreciate your time today, and good luck with everything.

Speaker 3:

Thank you, you too, adam.

Speaker 2:

Thanks for joining us on this week's episode of side hustle city. Well, you've heard from our guests, now let's hear from you. Join our community on Facebook, side hustle city. It's a group where people share ideas, share their inspirational stories and motivate each other to be successful and turn their side hustle into their main hustle. We'll see you there and we'll see you next week on the show. Thank you.

(Cont.) Keith Goode on Revolutionizing HR Tech & Entrepreneurial Growth
(Cont.) Keith Goode on Revolutionizing HR Tech & Entrepreneurial Growth